Using Case

Case

What is case in writing? Nouns and pronouns take different forms, or cases, to indicate their function in the sentence. There are three cases in English: Subjective, Objective, and Possessive.

Subjective Case…

The subject of a verb

These words are the subject of the sentence and commit actions. 

Pronouns of subjective case are as follows: I, you, he, she, it, we, they, and who.

Subjective Case looks like…

Incorrect: Him is the best swimmer.

Correct: He is the best swimmer.

Incorrect: John, Maria, Marty, and me went to the show. 

Correct: John, Maria, Marty, and I went to the show.

Objective Case…

The direct/indirect object of a verb  or the object of a preposition

Actions are committed upon these words. 

Objective Case looks like…

Incorrect: His mom took he to the grocery store.

Correct: His mom took him to the grocery store.

Incorrect: They threw I a party.

Correct: They threw me a party.

Possessive Case…

The direct/indirect object of a verb  or the object of a preposition

Actions are committed upon these words. 

This case can be difficult when using pronouns. Some pronouns in this case stand alone and others are used with a noun. 

Stand alone pronouns are mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs, and whose. Pronouns that modify nouns are my, your, his, her, its, our, their, and whose. In order to check one’s case usage, try breaking the sentence apart and ignore any other subjects that can cause confusion in your sentence.

Possessive Case looks like…

Incorrect: Jane got sunburn on hers shoulders.

Correct: Jane got sunburn on her shoulders.

Incorrect: The book is her’s.

Correct: The book is hers.

Incorrect: That is mine book.

Correct: That is my book.

Correct: That book is mine.

Download:

Document URL:

https://www-s3-live.kent.edu/s3fs-root/s3fs-public/file/case.pdf