Unmanned Aircraft Systems Minor | College of Aeronautics and Engineering | Kent State University

Unmanned Aircraft Systems Minor

The Unmanned Aircraft Systems minor provides students with an introduction to unmanned aerial systems and their increasing role in today's society. Using a systems engineering perspective, students will study roles and applications of unmanned aerial systems and apply their knowledge to the development of sensors, control, communications and flight operations.

Students graduating with this minor will be able to analyze various aspects of unmanned aerial systems operations, including safety, certification, applications, trends, regulations and performance; analyze the system components of unmanned aerial systems; and determine the communication and control systems necessary for unmanned aerial systems platform operations.

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will be able to analyze various aspects of UAS operations to include safety, certification, applications, trends, regulations, performance, etc.
  2. Students will be able to analyze the system components of unmanned aerial systems.
  3. Students will determine the necessary communication and control systems necessary for UAS platform operations.

Pre-requisite Courses for the Minor

  • AERN 15740 Elements of Flight Theory (5) or AERN 15745 Non-Pilot Element of Flight Theory (3)
  • AERN 25250 Elements of Aviation Weather (3)
  • AERN 25350 Fundamentals of Air Traffic Control (2)
  • AERN 25351 Fundamentals of Air Traffic Control Lab (1)
  • AERN 35644 Instrument Flight Theory (3) or AERN 35650 Non-Pilot Instrument Flight Theory (3)
  • AERN 45150 Applied Flight Dynamics I (3)

NOTE: All aeronautics concentrations already include the majority of the prerequisite courses for the Unmanned Aircraft Systems minor. Please work with your advisor to ensure you register for those that are missing from your particular concentration.

Required Courses and Expected Schedule

Required Courses and Expected Schedule
Required Course Expected Schedule
AERN 25800 Introduction to Unmanned Aircraft Systems (3) Every fall
AERN 35810 Unmanned Aircraft Systems (3) Every odd fall (2017, 2019, 2021...)
AERN 35830 Unmanned Aircraft Systems Sensing and Sensor Systems (3) Every even spring (2018, 2020, 2022…)
AERN 35840 Unmanned Aircraft Systems Command, Control and Communications (3) Every even fall (2018, 2020, 2022…)
AERN 45800 Unmanned Aircraft Systems Flight Operations Theory (3) Every odd spring (2017, 2019, 2021...)

View Overview (including Admission Requirements) and Program Requirements for the Minor in Unmanned Aircraft Systems

Guidelines for UAS or drone flying on the Kent Campus

 Useful Links

CAE Awarded Cooperative Research Agreement with Army Research Laboratory

College of Aeronautics and Engineering Awarded Cooperative Research Agreement with Army Research Laboratory to Study Unmanned Aircraft Propulsion Scalability

Principal Investigator: Dr. Blake Stringer

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) awarded a $130,000 cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to Kent State University’s College of Aeronautics & Engineering to study the scalability of quadcopter rotor-motor configurations for large-scale unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). Conventional small UAS (< 55 lbs) use variable-speed electric motors with small propeller-type rotors to lift and maneuver the aircraft. The Army has an interest in large quadcopter-type configurations for heavy payload delivery in remote areas. This also falls in line with the payload delivery efforts of commercial entities such as Amazon, although on a larger and heavier scale. As the size of the aircraft increases, the viability of variable-speed electric motors as the means of propulsion decreases. Dr. Stringer along with research assistant, Ms. Kendy Edmonds, will collaborate with ARL to design and construct a UAS propulsion test bench for experimenting with various rotor-motor combinations. Their research will focus on characterizing and quantifying rotor-motor performance, based upon data extracted while simulating aircraft of different sizes.

Dean and Dr. Stringer watch UAV