Florence Summer Institute | CCI Explore | Kent State University

DATES

May 30 to June 30, 2018

THE CAMPUS

Palazzo Vettori is a prestigious and ancient building located in the heart of Florence, at the corner of Via Cavour and Via Alfani, next to Piazza del Duomo. According to historian Guido Carocci, the fabric of the building started at the beginning of the 15th century. Its façade proclaims the new ideas of Renaissance architecture based on the use of rustication. Starting January 2016, Palazzo Vettori is the new home to the Kent State University Florence program.

ACADEMICS

You'll select 2 courses from those offered, earning 6 or 7 credits depending on your choices. All courses are taught in English and meet Monday through Thursday. Academic credit is awarded by Kent State University so if you are Kent State student, there is no need to transfer credits.  If you are not a Kent State student, the credits can be easily transferred. Be sure to meet with your academic advisor to discuss which courses best fit your program requirements so this experience will help you progress toward your degree.

Course offerings are subject to change and may vary each summer.  The following classes are open to all students.  Most classes have no prerequisites, but check the catalog or talk with an advisor for details.  Be sure to meet with your academic advisor to discuss which courses are best fit with the requirements for your major.

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COMMUNICATION COURSES

Course Name: COMM 45091 Nationalism and Globalism in the Age of Media (NEW)
Description:  The goal of this course is to introduce and discuss images, signs, symbols, cultural media products, personal and collective identities that emerge and circulate through mundane engagement with the global and the national media forms. We will explore the media and communication studies literature and will critically problematize the significant ontological concepts such as the local, the national, the transnational, and the global, and their usage in the scholarly literature.
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites:  None
Open to all students

Course Name: JMC 40006 Law of Mass Communication (NEW)
Description:
 This course will help develop 1) an understanding of how the law affects mass media and its practitioners, 2) an ability to identify legal issues and apply your knowledge to specific situations likely confronted by working professionals, 3) an appreciation of the history and role that the First Amendment and other protections for free expression and press freedom play in a diverse American society and how those protections differ from those in other countries around the world. After completing this course, you should be able to identify the basic parameters of First Amendment protection including the key legal limitations on free speech and press freedom. You should also be able to take steps to enforce your legal rights and protect yourself from legal constraints and understand some of the debate over media law protections across the globe.
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites:  None

Course Name: CCI 40095 Italian Cinema
Description: The course introduces the student to the world of Italian Cinema. In the first part the class will be analyzing Neorealism, a cinematic phenomenon that deeply influenced the ideological and aesthetic rules of film art. In the second part we will concentrate on the films that mark the decline of Neorealism and the talent of ‘new’ auteurs such as Fellini and Antonioni. The last part of the course will be devoted to the cinema from 1970s to the present in order to pay attention to the latest developments of the Italian industry. The course is a general analysis of post-war cinema and a parallel social history of this period using films as ‘decoded historical evidence’. Together with masterpieces such as Open City the screenings will include films of the Italian directors of  the ‘cinema d’autore’ such as Life is Beautiful and the 2004 candidate for the Oscar for Best Foreign Film, I Am Not Scared. The class will also analyze the different aspects of filmmaking both in Italian and the U.S. industry where I had the pleasure to work for many years in the editing department on films such as Dead Poets Society and The Godfather: Part III. The films in DVD format are dubbed in English or sub-titled.
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Open to all students

Course Name: COMM 35852 Intercultural Communication
Description: In the contemporary world characterized by globalization of goods, people and ideas, and by growing processes of internal diversification, intercultural competences are necessary requirements for every individual both for personal and professional life. Intercultural Communication deals with the relevance of difference (not only among cultures but also within a culture) that is approached both as a threat and as a resource. In our everyday experience the continuous reference to the ‘other’ (ethical, religious, political, gendered etc) is used to build up the very sense of our identities and in so doing dividing the world among ‘us’ and ‘them’, ‘bad’ and ‘good’, ‘friends’ and ‘enemies’. Diversity compels us to reflect upon our values, and the taken-for-grantedness of the social world in which we live. This course will move from the social constructivist approach trying to combine together sociology, cultural anthropology, and media studies investigating the role that diversity plays in our every-day life and the importance to acquire an intercultural communication approach in order to be more effective in our processes of communication, to solve conflicts and to better understand the interactions among individuals, institutions and cultures. Theories, concepts and problems will be presented through lectures and audiovisual materials. Interaction is strongly required and will be stimulated. Students will be invited to take part in the classes commenting on the topics presented, offering opinions, surveying and practicing ‘problem solving.’
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Open to all students

Course Name: COMM 45091 The Genius of Florence
Description: Students spend a semester in Florence, but they spend so much time traveling that it’s not unusual for them to finish the semester with little understanding of Florence itself or what defines the city and its people. This course is designed to give students a brief introduction to the genius and uniqueness of Florence. Course meetings will take place mostly at relevant locations, such as churches, streets, and museums, rather than in the classroom, as the purpose of the course is to begin to familiarize the students with the city and to train their eyes to notice and comprehend what is around them.
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: None
Open to all students