Dr. Erin Haynes Shares Results of Air Manganese Study | Kent State University
Dr. Erin Haynes is visiting our campus to share her findings on her recent study of  air Manganese on child neurodevelopment in East Liverpool, Ohio.

Dr. Erin Haynes Shares Results of Air Manganese Study

Kent State University at East Liverpool welcomes Dr. Erin Haynes to campus for a presentation about her research examining the impact of air manganese on child neurodevelopment. As a guest of the Environmental Club, she is dedicating her presentation to the memory of Dr. Roxanne Burns, a longtime biology professor on the East Liverpool Campus who died in 2014. 

While Haynes was the lead researcher for the recently-published study, “the Impact of Air Manganese on Child Neurodevelopment in East Liverpool,” Burns also was one of the scientists who actively participated in the research 

“This pilot study shows that more research is needed to determine the impact of manganese on area residents, but the findings indicate a strong relationship in the level of manganese found in child research subjects and IQ scores,” according to Dr. Lydia Rose, associate professor of sociology and current faculty advisor to the club. 

“The focus in bringing Dr. Haynes to campus is to have her share the scientific findings of this study on the children of East Liverpool and to remember Dr. Burns, who was well known for promoting scientific evidence in understanding the impact of chemicals and environmental poisons on the residents of East Liverpool.”

Dr. Roxanne BurnsBurns was one of the founding members, along with Dr. Patti Swartz, of the Earth Day Environmental Justice Conference held each year at Kent State East Liverpool.

Haynes met with the Environmental Club at its meeting earlier today and gave a presentation for students, faculty, staff and community members about her research. 

Haynes is an associate professor in the Division of Epidemiology at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. She is an environmental epidemiologist with expertise in metal toxicity, particularly manganese, and community-engaged research. She grew up in rural Appalachian Ohio and is passionate about working with rural communities to address their environmental health research questions. 

For additional information about the research led by Dr. Haynes, or for an electronic copy of the study, contact Rose at LRose17@kent.edu, using “Haynes Visit” in the subject line of the email.

Working with current Environmental Club members, Rose and club advisor Megan Rodgers collaborated with Amanda Kiger of Ohio Organizing Collaborative and Voices in Action to invite Haynes to share the study’s findings with the campus and community.  

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POSTED: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 10:55am
UPDATED: Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 11:20am