Academics | Sustainability | Kent State University

Academics

Sustainability Focused Degrees and Minor

Sustainability-focused programs are interdisciplinary academic programs that concentrate on sustainability as an integrated concept, including its social, economic, and environmental dimensions. The courses required for the successful completion of the program educate students about how different dimensions of sustainability relate to and support each other in theory and practice. The sustainability focus of such a program should be explicit in the program title or description.

 

Sustainability Focused Undergraduate Degrees

MINOR

Sustainability Related Degrees and Minors
Sustainability Related Colleges, Departments, and Areas of Study

Many faculty members across Kent State’s colleges and schools incorporate sustainability into their courses.  View the course inventory below or check out the following areas, which may be helpful starting points. Another option is to ask your advisor.

 

 

At Kent State's Technology's Energy and Sustainability Lab, researchers are working on ways to help lower our world's dependence on burning fossil fuels. Much of this research is centered on advancing fuel-cell technologies.

Tropical Field Biology and Conservation, a course taught by Costa Rican native and Kent State Associate Professor of Biology Oscar Rocha, is offered over winter break every other year. Students enrolled in the course spend two weeks in Costa Rica studying the various ecosystems of the tropical Central American nation.

Kent State University Sustainability Course Inventory

The course inventory below includes courses identified by faculty members as being “sustainability courses” or “courses that include sustainability” as defined by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education.  Note that some courses indicate “some sections” where multiple faculty teach the same course and may or may not include sustainability content.  Please contact the academic department with any questions.

Sustainability courses are courses in which the primary and explicit focus is on sustainability and/or on understanding or solving one or more major sustainability challenge.

A course that includes sustainability is primarily focused on a topic other than sustainability, but incorporates a unit or module on sustainability or a sustainability challenge, includes one or more sustainability-focused activities, or integrates sustainability issues throughout the course.

If you teach a "sustainability course" or a "course that includes sustainability"  or conduct sustainability research that should be added to this page please contact Melanie Knowles.

NEW: Introduction to Sustainability at Kent State Florence Summer Institute 2018

Undergraduate Sustainability Courses

ARCH 30501 ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY I  Basic principles of ecological design and architecture environmental systems including lighting,sonic and thermal systems.
ARCH 40001  Sustainable Design Research component addressing precedents, traditions, current directions in conservation of natural environment. Principles and methods of ecological design in architecture and urban design.
ARCH 40002 Systems Design Lecture and research component addressing comprehensive integration of mechanical, electrical communications structural life safety systems and sustainable design concerns.
ARCH 40101 Fourth Year Design Studio I Studio investigation of complex formal and spatial constructs addressing the comprehensive concerns of architecture. Special emphasis on understanding the conservation of the natural environment.
ARCH 40102  Fourth Year Studio Studio II Studio investigation of the comprehensive concerns and understanding of building systems integration.
ARCH 40502 ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY II Ecological design of large buildings. The investigation and analysis of lighting, thermal, water, electrical and waste systems in urban settings.
ARCH 46995 Human Consideration in Sustainable Design Special topics in architecture.
ARCS 30421 The Environmental Imperative Course begins with a historical introduction to the transformative role played by environmental technologies in modern architecture. This discussion is then brought into the present through an introduction to a wide range of contemporary thinking about sustainability in architecture and urbanism.
BSCI 30274 Forestry Management of the forest resource within appropriate environmental constraints for sustained use relative to watershed protection, lumber production, recreation and wildlife.
BSCI 40375 Environmental Biology and Management  The course teaches aspects of applied environmental biology, including habitat management methods, restoration ecology, sustainable use of natural resource, and public policy.  
ECON 32084 Economics of the Environment Examines economic theory of environmental and resource economics in a fashion that is understandable by students with varied backgrounds in economics. Emphasis on microeconomic theory and its application to environmental issues. Topics covered include "market failure" and its impact on the environment; cost benefit analysis; and input-output analysis. Designed for those interested in the environment or who may be planning careers in environmental or natural sciences.
ENG 01001 Introduction to College Writing I (some sections) Introduces the instruction and experiences necessary for students to acquire college-level literacy, with an emphasis on reading and writing college level texts.
ENG 11011 College Writing I (some sections) The study and practice of academic writing, including an introduction to rhetorical principles, the writing process, critical reading, research, and technology
ENG 21001 Introduction to Ethnic Literature of the United States (some sections) Introduction to Ethnic Literature of the United States investigates environmental justice issues, sustainability, and environmental issues in respect to ethnic populations within the United States including past practices and current environmental and environmental justice issues through African American, Chicana/o, Asian American, and Appalachian literature through novels, novel excerpts, essays, poetry, and plays. Authors include Louise Erdrich, Ana Castillo, Helena Maria Viramontes, Laurence Yep, George Ella Lyon, Maxine Hong Kingston, Karen Hesse, poets and musicians.
ENG 21011 College Writing II (some sections) Continuation of college-level writing instruction with emphasis on research and inquiry, culminating in a lengthy written and/or multi-modal project.
ENG 33001 U.S. Literature to 1865 (some sections) American Literature to 1865 includes issues of environmental justice, the environment, and sustainability through novels Hope Leslie  and Rural Hours as well as Margaret Fuller's nonfiction Summer on the Lakes. The search for wealth, the establishment of the mission systems, and treatment of Native Americans and taking over Native American land as well as Native American philosophy in regard to sustainability and the environment are all a part of the work of this class, as is the environmental destruction from war and increasing industrialization shown in such works as Herman Melville's The Paradise of Bachelors and The Tartarus of Maids. 
ENG 33003 U.S. Literature from 1945 to Present (some sections) American Literature since 1945 includes sections concerned with the environment, environmental justice issues, and sustainability. Such novels as Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony, Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five, David Guterson's Snow Falling on Cedars, Ana Castillo's So Far From God, films, poetry, and essays all have themes that examine environmental justice and environmental issues. Denise Giardina's Storming Heaven and The Unquiet Earth examine mining in Appalachia and environmental issues. Films that examine the environment, environmental sustainability, and environmental justice, poetry and song provide content.
ENG 49091  Senior Seminar (some sections) Capstone class in English that includes writing about the environment, nature as a character, and human connections to environmental, sustainability, and environmental justice issues in a seminar length paper. This class focuses of the work of Native American writer Louise Erdrich and Southern writer William Faulkner and the mythical areas both create. Through interconnection to the land, through examining poverty and resources, and through issues of environmental and racial justice, these writers commit to changes that allow for sustainability and increasing environmental justice. Films assist in assessing environmental justice issues.
FDM 35012 Sustainability in Fashion Analysis and development of design process thinking through the lens of sustainability and socially responsibility in fashion. Readings, documentaries and lectures are discussed in class. Interdisciplinary teams create a product that supports sustainable fashion futures.
GEOG 22070 Nature and Society This course provides an introduction to interdisciplinary perspectives in nature-society scholarship, focusing on human dimensions of environmental problem domains such as natural resources, ecosystems, climate, and sustainability. It provides a balance of theory and application to illustrative case studies.
GEOG 36065 Cities and Urbanization Course examines what is a city, how it has evolved over time under changing economic conditions, what is its internal structure and how this has been influenced by transportation developments. Special attention is paid to the causes and consequences of social diversity within the city and how cities differ throughout the world.
GEOG 41066-51066-71066 Climate Change and Its Impacts Examination of the evidence and causes of climate change and how this data is assessed. Past, present and future impacts of climate change and variability are discussed, along with policy implications.
GEOG 41073 Conservation of Natural Resources Evaluation of past and current problems associated with the management of natural resources and the environments associated with their utilization.
GEOG 41074 Resource Geography Considers the relationship between culture and resource availability and distribution, including environmental, social, political and economic impacts.
GEOG-21195-41195-71195 ST URBAN SUSTAINABILITY Special topics in environmental geography.
GEOG 41195 Global Environmental Issues (special topics but will soon be its own course number) This course examines the ethical and philosophical foundations of environmental belief systems and explores the Earth’s environment and its opportunities, constraints, and risks.
GEOL 21062 Environmental Earth Science Application of Earth Science to environmental problems, including natural resource extraction, water supply, pollution, waste disposal, landslides, floods and land use planning. Local field trip. 
HONR 10197 Honors Colloquium (some sections) Required of all honors freshmen in lieu of College Writing. Stresses exploration, discussion and communication of ideas expressed in works related to theme of colloquium.
HONR 10297 Honors Colloquium (some sections) Continuation of HONR 10197.
MIS 44009 Business Case for Sustainability Lays the foundation for sustainable development and the balance issues between economic, social and environmental interests. It frames the business enterprise within the natural and social environments, and surveys a variety of intersection points and the challenges they pose. Systems thinking and long term perspective are used to understand the potential consequences of organizational choices regarding goals and strategies, given consideration of how the natural environment increasingly drives the business environment.
RPTM 36083 Environmental Education and Conservation Environmental education helps people better understand the natural world and to develop attitudes and behaviors conducive to environmental conservation. Teaches students the foundations, principles and techniques of environmental education thus enabling students to prepare and present effective environmental education programs.
SOC 42560 Sociology of Food Food is essential, but like every other aspect of our lives the meaning of food and the experience of its preparation and consumption are socially determined. In this course we’ll explore the social dimensions of food consumption and production. We will consider the following questions and answer them by developing an understanding of sociological concepts and theories: What do our meals reveal about us – about our history, culture, our gender and race and ethnicity, socio-economic status, religious beliefs, and our family life? How does food consumption differ in different societies? How do the media and corporations influence our food choices? What does food mean symbolize and in what ways are these meanings manipulated and why? How is food production carried out in different contexts and what can we learn about the social organization of work from studying food production? How does what we eat contribute to local and global environmental problems?
SPED 43311 DHH Students with Special Needs IEP and transition planning strategies and program content for deaf/hard-of-hearing students w/ADHD, BD, DD, VI, DB, LD, CMI, TBI, chronically health impaired/medically fragile, gifted.Curriculum and lesson development and adaptation for impacted areas.
SPED 43313 Literacy Assessment and Intervention for DHH Students  Theoretical overview of integrated linguistics curriculum and reading theories. Strategies to address DHH difficulties and barriers, instructional planning and materials design, and ongoing assessment strategies. Course includes a practicum placement.
TECH 27210 Introduction to Sustainability Introduces the students to the concepts of sustainability and its three pillars, namely, economic growth, environmental protection, and social equality. Students taking the course will understand the language and concepts of sustainability and will acquire the knowledge to further study sustainability.
TECH 42100 Fuel Cells and Applications Specialized advanced instruction oriented primarily to the theoretical base and application of current technology developed by experts in the specific technology.
TECH 47210 Sustainable Energy I A comprehensive overview of energy sources and energy systems, with an emphasis on renewable energy and the implementation and sustainability of various forms of energy. Examines the characteristics of conventional non-renewable energy systems, along with alternate, renewable energy sources and systems. Includes fundamental energy concepts and the conversion, delivery, distribution, and storage of energy. Explores the technological application of various sources of energy and compares their benefits and limitations. Also presents an overview of present U.S. and global energy needs and demands, and the sustainable energy technologies that may be used to meet future energy demands. 
TECH 47211 Sustainable Energy II

An in-depth study of the analysis, selection, and implementation of various energy and power sources, with an emphasis on the use of renewable, sustainable energy systems. Focuses on determining energy needs, and on assessing and comparing energy systems with respect to efficiency, technical feasibility, available resources, cost and sustainability characteristics. Includes economics of energy systems, methods for determining costs, and cost-benefit analysis of various energy and power systems. Also includes the social, economic and environmental impact associated with the development, implementation and use of various forms of energy.

Graduate Sustainability Courses

ARCH 67510 Sustainable Building Construction I First course of a two-course sequence. Provides an in-depth survey of design, pre- and post-construction activities pertinent to Green Building and Sustainable Design of the Built environment. Reviews fundamental concepts and principles of sustainable building design and construction with special emphasis on construction site issues. Provides a comprehensive review of impact of site on construction and building design on the site and its resources. Focus is on understanding the role building design and construction play on resources efficiency and minimizing the impact of construction activities on the environment.
ARCH 67511 Sustainable Building Construction II Second course of a two-course sequence. Provides an in-depth survey of design, pre- and post-construction activities pertinent to Green Building and Sustainable Design of the Built environment. Reviews fundamental concepts and principles of sustainable building design and construction with special emphasis on building systems. Provides a comprehensive review of impact of building component, materials, and systems on design and construction of High-performance buildings. Focus is on understanding the role building design and construction play on resources efficiency and minimizing the impact of construction activities on the environment.
ARCH56995 Human Considerations in Sustainable Design Special topics in architecture.
ARCH66995 Advanced Building Energy Systems Special topics in architecture.
BSCI 50375/70375 Environmental Biology and Management  The course teaches aspects of applied environmental biology, including habitat management methods, restoration ecology, sustainable use of natural resource, and public policy.  
ENG 67591/77591 Ecocriticism Seminar In-depth study of important topics in contemporary theory and criticism. 
GEOG 41066-51066-71066 Climate Change and Its Impacts Examination of the evidence and causes of climate change and how this data is assessed. Past, present and future impacts of climate change and variability are discussed, along with policy implications.
GEOG 41073 Conservation of Natural Resources Evaluation of past and current problems associated with the management of natural resources and the environments associated with their utilization.
GEOG 51074/71074 Resource Geography Considers the relationship between culture and resource availability and distribution, including environmental, social, political and economic impacts.
GEOG 21195/41195/71195 ST URBAN SUSTAINABILITY Special topics in environmental geography.
GEOG 51195/71195 Global Environmental Issues This course examines the ethical and philosophical foundations of environmental belief systems and explores the Earth’s environment and its opportunities, constraints, and risks.
GEOL 40095/50095 ST Urban Hydrology In this course we will investigate the science and management of water in cities and built environments. We will approach the subject from an interdisciplinary perspective, integrating hydrology, geology, biology, architecture/engineering, and the social sciences.  As an advanced hydrology class we will work on building skills in hydrologic data analysis. We will analyze real, complex data sets from Cleveland and elsewhere and we will read and discuss journal articles focused on water problems and solutions in cities.
SPED 53311 DHH Students with Special Needs IEP and transition planning strategies and program content for deaf/hard-of-hearing students w/ADHD, BD, DD, VI, DB, LD, CMI, TBI, chronically health impaired/medically fragile, gifted.Curriculum and lesson development and adaptation for impacted areas.
SPED 53313 Literacy Assessment and Intervention for DHH Students  Theoretical overview of integrated linguistics curriculum and reading theories. Strategies to address DHH difficulties and barriers, instructional planning and materials design, and ongoing assessment strategies. Course includes a practicum placement.
TECH 61095  Fuel Cell Technology and Engineering Study of special topics in technology including technological tours offered irregularly as interest and opportunities permit.
Undergraduate Courses that Include Sustainability

AERN 45700 Aircraft Design Preliminary design of a fixed-wing aircraft for a specific mission: weight estimates; wing planform, airfoil and propulsion; selection airframe configuration and layout design; performance analysis; and overall systems integration.
BMRT 11009 Intro to Management Technology Study of planning, organizing, directing/leadership, controlling, staffing, decision making, and communication theories and management applications of human and material resources and methods. It is recommended that any reading courses indicted by COMPASS score are taken prior to enrolling in this course.
BSCI 10002 Life on Planet Eart Explores the fascinating breadth of life on Earth including the unique ecology and survival strategies of animals, plants and microbes in their natural habitats.
BSCI 40162 Soil Biology The ecology and physiology of organisms that live in soil, including microbes, plants and animals. The physical and chemical aspects of soil are introduced to understand how organisms in soils impact nutrient cycles and ecosystem development.
BSCI 40170 Stream Biology Identification, biology and ecology of stream-inhabiting organisms. Lecture two hours, lab three hours weekly.
BSCI 40195-009  Urban Forestry Special topics in biology.
BSCI 40195-015/50195-015  Urban Wildlife Special topics in biology.
BSCI 40368 Wetland Ecology and Management  The course teaches biology of wetland  species, differences in abiotic  and biotic factors among the major types of wetlands, and current wetland policy and management techniques.
BSCI 40525 Wildlife Resources Ecological parameters are discussed relative to the preservation and management of wild animal populations. Aesthetic, economic and environmental values are discussed.
CHEM 10030 Chemistry in our World A course for non-science majors that utilizes environmental and consumer topics to introduce chemical principles and develop critical-thinking skills.
ECON 22060 Principles of Microeconomics Principles and policies affecting prices, including factor incomes, under alternative market structures. Tools developed to examine social problems, including poverty, crime, pollution and international relations.
ENG 11002 College Writing I-Stretch Continues the instruction and practice necessary to write for college, with emphasis on the reading, thinking, writing and technological skills necessary for writing college level texts.
ENG 11011 College Writing I (some sections) The study and practice of academic writing, including an introduction to rhetorical principles, the writing process, critical reading, research, and technology
ENG 21011 College Writing II (some sections) Continuation of college-level writing instruction with emphasis on research and inquiry, culminating in a lengthy written and/or multi-modal project.
ENG 30066 Writing in the Public Sphere (some sections) Writing course focusing on a multimodal service-learning project collaborating with peer and community partners in an online, hybrid or face-to-face delivery system.
ENG 41098 Guided Research in English Independent student research with faculty guidance.
ENTR 27056 Introduction to Entrepreneurship The study of the entrepreneurial process from conception to birth of a new venture. This includes attributes of successful entrepreneurs, opportunity recognition, innovation, venture screening, risk assessment, risk tolerance, identification of resources and business planning to learn how to turn opportunities into viable business.
FDM 25011 Fashion Branding An overview of branding in the fashion industry. Analysis of strategies for creating (brand awareness), maintaining (brand management) and enhancing the strength (brand asset management) of fashion brands. Class members work individual an as part of a group. 
FDM 30260 Product Development in the Fashion Industry Researching, planning, developing and presenting a fashion product line for a identified target market with regard to prices, styling and timing.
GEOG 10160 Introduction to Geography Emphasizes processes that generate diverse global human and environmental patterns. Interaction of geographical elements as expressed in spatial organization of cities, land use and cultural and political regions.
GEOG 22061 Human Geography Examination of spatial patterns of human behavior, with a focus on population & migration, economic differences, cultural elements, and health/environmental factors.
GEOL 21080 All About the Oceans Explores the many fascinating (and some still little known) features and processes of the Earth's Oceans including mid-ocean ridges, hydrothermal vents, tsunamis, tides, rogue waves, marine life, and the role of the Ocean in climate change.
GEOL 40095 Environmental Soil Science Explores the fundamental properties of soils and the integrated processes involved in rock weathering, soil formation, and the environmental transport of nutrients and contaminants.
JMC 40095 ST: Environmental Media Selected topics of special interest not covered in depth in existing courses; offered as resources permit.
MIS 24163 Principles of Management  Introductory course in management and organizational design. The leading contributions in the area are reviewed and practical implications are developed. The course covers the principles that most management professors have come to expect in an introductory course: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. In addition, the students need to be aware of critical issues managers must be aware of to succeed: diversity, globalization, ethics, technology, among them. The course serves as an introduction to many upper level business courses.
MIS 44062 Supply Chain Management Students learn the basic analytical tools needed to coordinate business operations across the value chain. Course involves hands-on coverage of supply chain management with emphasis on supplier partnering and development, customer relations management, strategic sourcing and pricing, e-business, measuring supply chain performance, mass customization, planning supply and demand coordination in the supply chain.
PH 30006 Introduction to Environmental Health and Safety Introduction: the environment at risk; environmental epidemiology, environmental toxicology, environmental policy and regulation, watershed management, safe drinking water, wastewater management, vector-born and zoonotic disease, air quality, solid and hazardous waste, food protection, radiation safety and injury prevention, occupational health and safety, total worker health, the built environment
PH 30101 Solid and Hazardous Waste Management Solid and hazardous waste programs and practices are explored. Pollution prevention, safety, sanitation practices, sustainability concepts, management, and regulations pertinent to solid and hazardous waste such as RCRA, are discussed and studied. Consumption, garbage handling, landfill design and disposal, sustainability concepts, reuse, recycling, composting and other waste strategies are presented. Hazardous waste and materials issues in the environment are introduced; such as HW disposal, TSD Facilities, underground storage tanks, “Superfund”, brown fields and related issues.
PH 32005 Emerging Issues in Social and Behavioral Science Provides students with exposure to touchstone issues in public health programming that have social and behavioral science implications. Topics reflect emergent priority areas and are expected to vary from semester to semester. Examples of current, emerging issues that may be covered include the Healthy People 2020 initiative, leading health indicators, role of CDC, state and local health departments and NGOs in promoting health behaviors, program recruitment, retention, evaluation and generalization challenges, ethical issues including informed consent and voluntary change, funding challenges for prevention programs, grant writing exposure, role of politics in public health programming, evidenced-based practices and practice-based evidence.
PH 34001 Public Health Interventions I Provides an overview of the planning and development of public health interventions including environmental, social, and behavioral public health issues from a social-ecological perspective, with attention to evidence-based, theoretical, and ethical approaches.
PH 44000 Health Disparities Understanding the factors involved in health disparities at the national and global level, and the impact of health disparities on public health.
PHY 13001 General College Physics I Principles of mechanics, heat and sound. Three-hour lecture, one-hour recitation.
PHY 13021 General College Physics Laboratory I Introductory lab to accompany PHY 13001 or PHY 13011.
PHY 21430 Frontiers in Astronomy Modern description of astrophysical observations, the results of these observations and the physical principles based on them. Not counted toward requirements for physics major. 
SOC 12050 Introduction to Sociology Scientific approach to understanding social interaction, institutions and organization.
SPAD 45024 Sport in Global Perspective Students critically analyze how sport relates to general features of globalization and the connection between global and local politics (including ethnic, religious, gender, environmental and sociospacial politics). The underlying assumption is that sport is part of a growing network of global interdependencies that bind human beings together.
SPED 62951 Early Intervention in natural environments This seminar targets early childhood special education and intervention professionals that comprise the field of early intervention from practitioners to future leaders in the field. Recommended practice guidelines of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) indicate that interventions should be embedded and distributed within and across the routines, activities and places that are part of the child’s daily experience. In keeping with DEC recommendations, this course will explore issues related to the various natural environments of the children in search of the routines, activities, and places that offer the maximum learning and practice opportunities that are family centered, developmentally and individually appropriate, culturally sensitive, and least intrusive. 
SPED 63892 Early Intervention Internship The Early Intervention Internship involves supervised observation and participation in an early intervention setting(s) for children ages birth to three with developmental delays and disabilities or supervised observation and participation in research and scholarly activities related to the development, delivery, and evaluation of early intervention services to children and their families. Students may be placed at a county board of developmental disabilities, center-, community-, or home-based early intervention program, a developmental center, childcare center, a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or other approved placement. The Early Intervention internship will provide students practical experience in an Early Intervention professional setting, one that allows students to develop and refine a variety of skills when working with infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families.
Graduate Courses that Include Sustainability

AERN 55700 Aircraft Design Preliminary design of a fixed-wing aircraft for a specific mission: weight estimates; wing planform, airfoil and propulsion; selection airframe configuration and layout design; performance analysis; and overall systems integration.
BSCI 50170/70170 Stream Biology Identification, biology and ecology of stream-inhabiting organisms. Lecture two hours, laboratory three hours weekly.
BSCI 50195-009/70195-009  Urban Forestry Special topics in biology.
BSCI 50195-015  Urban Wildlife Special topics in biology.
BSCI 50368/70368 Wetland Ecology and Management  The course teaches biology of wetland  species, differences in abiotic  and biotic factors among the major types of wetlands, and current wetland policy and management techniques.
BSCI 50373 Population and Community Ecology Theory and experimental approaches to studying population and community ecology.
BSCI 50525/70525 Wildlife Resources Ecological parameters are discussed relative to the preservation and management of wild animal populations. Aesthetic, economic and environmental values are discussed.
CI 67095 Earth Systems Science Specialized offerings in response to emerging or selected program needs in curriculum design, development and implementation.
HPM 53004 Public Health Policy, Law, and Ethics Provides a comprehensive review of health policymaking, public health law and ethical principles as applied to public health decision making.
HPM 81000 Public Health Law and Regulation Enables participants to describe, apply, and explain key aspects and principles of law, regulation, and policy relating to public health issues and topics. Requires students to master the content material for the course, and apply it to particular (a) topics or issues relating public health. Students also are required to design andor conduct a research project and explain their hypotheses, methods, findings andor conclusions.
SPED 62951 Early Intervention in natural environments This seminar targets early childhood special education and intervention professionals that comprise the field of early intervention from practitioners to future leaders in the field. Recommended practice guidelines of the Division for Early Childhood (DEC) indicate that interventions should be embedded and distributed within and across the routines, activities and places that are part of the child’s daily experience. In keeping with DEC recommendations, this course will explore issues related to the various natural environments of the children in search of the routines, activities, and places that offer the maximum learning and practice opportunities that are family centered, developmentally and individually appropriate, culturally sensitive, and least intrusive. 
SPED 63892 Early Intervention Internship The Early Intervention Internship involves supervised observation and participation in an early intervention setting(s) for children ages birth to three with developmental delays and disabilities or supervised observation and participation in research and scholarly activities related to the development, delivery, and evaluation of early intervention services to children and their families. Students may be placed at a county board of developmental disabilities, center-, community-, or home-based early intervention program, a developmental center, childcare center, a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) or other approved placement. The Early Intervention internship will provide students practical experience in an Early Intervention professional setting, one that allows students to develop and refine a variety of skills when working with infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families.
SRM 55024 Sport in Global Persepective Students critically analyze how sport relates to general features of globalization and the connection between global and local politics (including ethnic, religious, gender, environmental and sociospacial politics). The underlying assumption is that sport is part of a growing network of global interdependencies that bind human beings together.
Departments

Subject Department
AERN Applied Eng/Sustainabilit/Tech
TECH Applied Eng/Sustainabilit/Tech
ARCH Architecture
ARCS Architecture
BSCI Biological Sciences
PH Biostats/Enviro Health/Epidem
CHEM Chemistry and Biochemistry
ECON Economics
ENG English
FDM Fashion Design and Merch
RPTM Foundations Leadership Admin
SPAD Foundations Leadership Admin
SRM Foundations Leadership Admin
GEOG Geography
GEOL Geology
HPM Health Policy and Management
HONR Honors
JMC Journalism and Mass Comm
SPED Lifespan Dev and Educ Sciences
MIS Management Information Systems
ENTR Marketing and Entrepreneurship
PHY Physics
BMRT Regional College
SOC Sociology
CI Teaching Learning and Curriculm
Kent State Sustainability Research Inventory

Applied Engineering, Sustainability & Tech 
  • George Bigham, Construction Management
  • Darwin Boyd
  • Yanhai Du
  • David Stringer
  • Roberto Uribe
Architecture & Environmental Design
  • Reid Coffman
  • Rui Liu
  • Adil Sharag-Eldin
Biological Sciences
  • Christopher Blackwood
  • David Costello
  • Ferenc A. de Szalay
  • Lauren Kinsman-Costello
  • Oscar Rocha
  • David Ward
Business Technology
  • Joseph Muscatello
English
  • Barbara George
  • Ryan Hediger
  • Uma Krishnan
  • Katherine Orr
  • Patti Capel Swartz
Foundations, Leadership & Administration
  • Susan Iverson
Geography
  • Jennifer Mapes
  • Kelly Turner
Geology
  • Elizabeth M. Herndon
  • Anne Jefferson
Health Policy and Management
  • John Hoornbeek
Lifespan Dev & Educ Sciences
  • Sanna  Harjusola-Webb 
  • Pamela Luft
Management & Information Systems
  • Pratim Datta
  • Cathy L. Z. DuBois
  • Alfred Guiffrida
Marketing and Entrepreneurship
  • Chris Groening
Sociology
  • Lydia Rose
Teaching, Learning, & Curr Studies
  • Bridget Mulvey
University Libraries
  • Karen MacDonald