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School of Foundations, Leadership and Administration

Schwebel Lecture Series celebrates 20th anniversary

Photo of Karim Khalifa

Kevin J. Spence, a Kent State University higher education administration doctoral student, visited Cienfuegos, Cuba, to help bridge Kent State’s College of Education, Health and Human Services’ past to the present.

In October, Spence discussed the Visiting Scholar program at Kent State’s Gerald H. Read Center for International and Intercultural Education during the second Workshop of Strategic Alliances for the Internationalization of Higher Education at the University of Cienfuegos.

In this digital age, with phones at our finger tips, you would think that access to constant communication would make us feel closer to one another. But a new study by researchers at Kent State University shows that may not be the case. In fact, cell phone use might actually lead to feeling less socially connected, depending on your gender or cell phone habits.

In this digital age, with phones at our finger tips, you would think that access to constant communication would make us feel closer to one another. But a new study by researchers at Kent State University shows that may not be the case. In fact, cell phone use might actually lead to feeling less socially connected, depending on your gender or cell phone habits.

The Hospitality Management program at Kent State University is pleased to announce its 2016 Schwebel Lecture Series speaker, Rick Doody, chairman and founder of the Bravo | Brio Restaurant Group. The lecture will take place on Thursday, April 14, from 4-5 p.m. in Ritchie Hall, Room 214. Ritchie Hall is located at 225 Terrace Drive in Kent, Ohio. A reception will follow the lecture. This event is free and open to the public, and no reservations are required.

Kent State University researcher Michele K. Donnelly, Ph.D., and University of Toronto researchers Peter Donnelly, Ph.D., and Mark Norman found that the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics failed to bring more women into the competition. Only 40 percent of competitors were women, making this the first time since 1988 that the percentage of women athletes saw a decline.