May 4 | 1537459578 | Kent State University

May 4

“We at Kent State feel called to play the role of convener -- to broker conversations that are more civil, braver, and more productive.”

At a time when our national conversation is plagued with division with opposing sides routinely attacking each other’s allegiances, Kent State University President Beverly J. Warren looked to the university’s history, specifically the campus shootings on May 4, 1970, and called on America to learn from its past to heal its present.

The tragic events that occurred on the campus of Kent State University on May 4, 1970, where four students lost their lives and nine others were wounded by the Ohio National Guard, had a lasting impact that continues to resonate nearly a half-century later.

Nearly five decades have passed since Ohio National Guardsmen fired into a gathering of protesting students on the campus of Kent State University, killing four, wounding nine and impacting generations.

A portion of Kent State University’s Kent Campus has taken its place alongside the nation’s most significant historic locations, joining such sites as the Grand Canyon National Park, Pearl Harbor and the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

Those 17 acres represent the location of the historic events of May 4, 1970, where protesting students, observers and soldiers gathered on that fateful day when the Ohio National Guard shot and killed four students and wounded nine others.

PLEASE NOTE: The noon commemoration will take place at the Kent Student Center Ballroom due to weather. Also, the 3:30 p.m. dedication of the National Historic Landmark has been moved indoors to the Kent Student Center Kiva.

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A portion of Kent State University’s Kent Campus has taken its place alongside the nation’s most significant historic locations, joining such sites as the Grand Canyon National Park, Pearl Harbor and the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

Chautauqua Institution is pleased to announce Kent State University President Beverly J. Warren will be among the featured lecturers during the institution’s weeklong investigation of “The Forgotten: History and Memory in the 21st Century,” Aug. 11-18, 2018. President Warren’s talk will focus on the lessons, learnings and remembrances of May 4, 1970. President Warren will speak at 10:45 a.m. Aug. 15 in the Chautauqua Amphitheater on the institution grounds.

Sandy Scheuer was on her way to class on May 4, 1970, when she was shot and killed by Ohio National Guardsmen responding to protests of the Vietnam War at Kent State University. She was a junior honors student, a speech therapy major and a proud member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority.

School of Communication Studies alumna Natalie Moses recently earned the National Award of Excellence for her feature-length movie script at the annual Broadcast Education Association and National Association of Broadcasters (BEA/NAB) conference in Las Vegas. Moses was a graduate student at Kent State University who graduated in May 2017.

 

Kent State University held its 47th annual commemoration of May 4, 1970, with events taking place May 3 and 4. The annual commemoration, hosted by the May 4 Task Force, provides an opportunity for the university community to gather and remember those who were lost and injured during the tragedy and also reflect on what May 4 means today.

Updated 5/2/17 - Please note that the 47th annual commemoration on May 4 at noon has been moved to the Kent Student Center Ballroom due to the weather.

Lecia Brooks of the Southern Poverty Law Center to serve as keynote speaker

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