May 4 Visitors Center

The “Armed With Our Voices” exhibit provides a powerful form of cross-generational connection that engages users in the events of May 4, 1970, and the importance of peace, conflict resolution and student activism today. Kent State University’s Wick Poetry Center is set to debut its “Armed With Our Voices” exhibit this week in Austin, Texas, as part of the National Council for the Social Studies annual conference.   Curated and designed in collaboration with Kent State’s May 4 Visitors Center and the College of Arts and...

“Our Brother Jeff,” a new exhibition at Kent State University’s May 4 Visitors Center, honors the life of Jeffrey Miller, one of the four Kent State students shot and killed by the Ohio National Guard on May 4, 1970. Many people know Jeffrey Miller from the Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph that shows his body on the ground with a 14-year-old runaway screaming over him after the Ohio National Guard opened fire on a group of Kent State University students, killing four, including Miller, and wounding nine others on May 4, 1970. What people may not know is Miller...

Photographs of the four students killed on May 4, 1970, sit on the stage in the Kent Student Center Ballroom during the annual May 4 Commemoration. Nearly a century ago, residents of the Greenwood homes district of Tulsa, Oklahoma, endured one of the darkest days in our country’s history. According to news reports, a single day of race riots in May 1921 ended with as many as 300 dead and 1,000 homes destroyed.  J. Kavin Ross, an advocate for the research and review of the incident, will...

A singer performs on stage in the Kent Student Center Ballroom during the 49th annual May 4 Commemoration. Nearly a century ago, residents of the Greenwood homes district of Tulsa, Oklahoma, endured one of the darkest days in our country’s history. According to news reports, a single day of race riots in May 1921 ended with as many as 300 dead and 1,000 homes destroyed.  J. Kavin Ross, an advocate for the research and review of the incident, served...

Photographs of the four students killed on May 4, 1970, sit on the stage in the Kent Student Center Ballroom during the annual May 4 Commemoration. Nearly a century ago, residents of the Greenwood homes district of Tulsa, Oklahoma, endured one of the darkest days in our country’s history. According to news reports, a single day of race riots in May 1921 ended with as many as 300 dead and 1,000 homes destroyed.  J. Kavin Ross, an advocate for the research and review of the incident, will...

Personal items of Bill Schroeder, including his Eagle Scout Award and Boy Scout sash showing his merit badges, are on display in a new exhibition at Kent State University’s May 4 Visitors Center called “Bill: An All-American Boy.” Bill Schroeder was from Lorain, Ohio, and attended Colorado School of Mines on a ROTC scholarship before transferring to Kent State University to study psychology. He was also an Eagle Scout, musician and athlete. On May 4, 1970, the 19-year-old stopped to see what was happening on the Commons and then proceeded on his way to class when he was shot...

Personal items of Bill Schroeder, including his Eagle Scout Award and Boy Scout sash showing his merit badges, are on display in a new exhibition at Kent State University’s May 4 Visitors Center called “Bill: An All-American Boy.” Bill Schroeder was from Lorain, Ohio, and attended Colorado School of Mines on a ROTC scholarship before transferring to Kent State University to study psychology. He was also an Eagle Scout, musician and athlete. On May 4, 1970, the 19-year-old stopped to see what was happening on the Commons and then proceeded on his way to class when he was shot...

A visitor learns about the events surrounding May 4, 1970 while visiting the May 4 Visitors Center Kent State University sophomore Phil Morgan said he learned about the May 4, 1970, shootings during a history lesson in middle school that included few details, except the fact that the Ohio National Guard’s presence at a student protest ended in the deaths of four students. Mr. Morgan got a better understanding of this tragic event during his...

The names of those killed on May 4, 1970, is displayed on the B’nai B’rith Hillel Marker in the parking lot of Prentice Hall on the campus of Kent State. A portion of Kent State University’s Kent Campus has taken its place alongside the nation’s most significant historic locations, joining such sites as the Grand Canyon National Park, Pearl Harbor and the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. Those 17 acres represent the location of the historic events of May 4, 1970, where protesting...

Portraits of the four students killed on May 4, 1970, sit on chairs on stage in the Kent Student Center Ballroom during the 47th Commemoration of May 4. PLEASE NOTE: The noon commemoration will take place at the Kent Student Center Ballroom due to weather. Also, the 3:30 p.m. dedication of the National Historic Landmark has been moved indoors to the Kent Student Center Kiva. ————— A portion of Kent State University’s Kent Campus has taken its place alongside the nation’s most...