brain health | 1553020162 | Kent State University

brain health

With great hope and expectations for the future of brain health research at Kent State University, President Beverly J. Warren introduced Michael N. Lehman, Ph.D., as the inaugural director of the university’s Brain Health Research Institute on Feb. 25.

Michael N. Lehman, Ph.D., a leader in the field of neuroendocrinology and circadian rhythms, is the newly appointed director of Kent State University’s Brain Health Research Institute.

WHAT:
Kent State University President Beverly J. Warren will introduce the inaugural director of the university’s Brain Health Research Institute on Monday, Feb. 25. The new director will discuss our plans for widespread collaboration within the Northeast Ohio health community for brain health research.

The event will take place in the lobby of the Integrated Sciences Building, located at 1175 Lefton Esplanade on the Kent Campus. The program begins at 10 a.m.

People who suffer trauma will, with few exceptions, never forget what happened to them, but a Kent State University researcher may be able to offer them the hope of living without constant fear and anxiety.

Heather Caldwell, Ph.D., a professor in Kent State University’s Department of Biological Sciences, recently received a $450,000 grant to study the role that oxytocin plays in the developing brain.

Labeled by some as “the bonding hormone,” oxytocin is well known for helping pregnant mothers with uterine contraction while in labor, milk letdown while breastfeeding and a feeling of euphoria when cuddling with their infants. But, there is still much that researchers do not know about how this hormone works in the brains of children.

The College of Arts and Sciences invites you to join us for the sixth annual Neuroscience Symposium on April 25-26, 2018 at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center. This year's topic is "The Neuroscience of the Healthy Brain," with John Cryan, PhD, as our keynote speaker on Wednesday April 25 at 7 p.m. Dr. Cryan is a professor and chair of the Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience at University College of Cork (Ireland) and a TEDMED speaker.

Additional talks will take place between 8:30-4:00 p.m. on Thursday April 26. Speakers include:

With stress levels on the rise and mental health being one of the most crucial issues in public health today, Kent State University is hosting the Brain Health Summit on Wednesday, Feb. 21, to share the importance of a healthy brain. The event is presented by Kent State’s Division for Research and Sponsored Programs and Kent State of Wellness, a university-wide effort that promotes a culture of health and wellness for students and employees at all Kent State campuses.

 

Biological anthropology researchers in Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences have again shed new light on the very old topic of human origins.

In two new journal articles appearing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers report likely explanations for the evolution of human social behavior and unparalleled intelligence. The human lineage is characterized by remarkable demographic success relative to our nearest relatives and by advanced social traits such as language, empathy, and altruism.

Brain Health Summit

Join students, staff & faculty for an interactive discussion of how each of us can improve the health of our brain and the quality of our thinking through lifestyle changes that include movement, nutrition & stress reduction!

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