brain health

The Kent State University Brain Health Research Institute announces the following Pilot Grant 2019 award winners: John Gunstad (KSU Psychol), Lindsay Scott (UH), Rachel Ostrand (IBM) Using automated speech analysis to predict cognitive decline and future Alzheimer’s disease William Lechner (KSU Psychol), Amit Anand (CCF) Optimizing treatment...

Kent State President Beverly J. Warren acknowledges the new director of the university With great hope and expectations for the future of brain health research at Kent State University, President Beverly J. Warren introduced Michael N. Lehman, Ph.D., as the inaugural director of the university’s Brain Health Research Institute on Feb. 25. Dr. Lehman, a leader in the field of neuroendocrinology and circadian rhythms, comes to Kent...

Michael N. Lehman, Ph.D., a leader in the field of neuroendocrinology and circadian rhythms, is the newly appointed director of Kent State University’s Brain Health Research Institute. Michael N. Lehman, Ph.D., a leader in the field of neuroendocrinology and circadian rhythms, is the newly appointed director of Kent State University’s Brain Health Research Institute. In his new role, Dr. Lehman will bring together researchers from a wide variety of disciplines at Kent State and throughout Northeast Ohio whose work seeks to...

Michael N. Lehman, Ph.D., a leader in the field of neuroendocrinology and circadian rhythms, is the newly appointed director of Kent State University’s Brain Health Research Institute. WHAT: Kent State University President Beverly J. Warren will introduce the inaugural director of the university’s Brain Health Research Institute on Monday, Feb. 25. The new director will discuss our plans for widespread collaboration within the Northeast Ohio health community for brain health research. The event will take place in the lobby of...

John D. Johnson, Ph.D., associate professor of biological sciences at Kent State University, received a three-year, $450,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health. People who suffer trauma will, with few exceptions, never forget what happened to them, but a Kent State University researcher may be able to offer them the hope of living without constant fear and anxiety. John D. Johnson, Ph.D., associate professor of biological sciences in Kent State’s College of Arts and...

Heather Caldwell, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences at Kent State University, was awarded a $450,000 grant to study how oxytocin affects the development of the female and male brain. Heather Caldwell, Ph.D., a professor in Kent State University’s Department of Biological Sciences, recently received a $450,000 grant to study the role that oxytocin plays in the developing brain. Labeled by some as “the bonding hormone,” oxytocin is well known for helping pregnant mothers with uterine contraction while in labor, milk...

Heather Caldwell, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences at Kent State University, was awarded a $450,000 grant to study how oxytocin affects the development of the female and male brain. The way in which a parent responds to a child’s injury often impacts how upset the little one becomes. A panicked parent often means a crying, hysterical child. A calm kiss on the boo-boo and a quick return to regular business, though, and the child is likely to forget about the incident. This age-old bit of parenting wisdom is one component of a...

Neurons The College of Arts and Sciences invites you to join us for the sixth annual Neuroscience Symposium on April 25-26, 2018 at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center. This year's topic is "The Neuroscience of the Healthy Brain," with John Cryan, PhD, as our keynote speaker on Wednesday April 25 at 7 p.m. Dr. Cryan is a professor and...

Neurons With stress levels on the rise and mental health being one of the most crucial issues in public health today, Kent State University is hosting the Brain Health Summit on Wednesday, Feb. 21, to share the importance of a healthy brain. The event is presented by Kent State’s Division for Research and Sponsored Programs and Kent State of Wellness, a...

Mary Ann Raghanti, Ph.D., compared neurochemical profiles in the striatum, a brain region that modulates social behavior, among humans, chimpanzees, gorillas, and monkeys and found a unique profile in humans. Biological anthropology researchers in Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences have again shed new light on the very old topic of human origins. In two new journal articles appearing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers report likely explanations for the evolution of human social behavior...