Brain Health | Kent State University

Brain Health

This section highlights a few of the ongoing projects conducted by our faculty that will show you why we’re a national leader in brain health research. You’ll have a chance to learn about new insights into reducing the risk for Alzheimer’s disease, how our brains can “turn up our temperature” to help us lose weight, important differences in the brain waves of Tibetan monks, and some others.

The Brain Health Research Institute (BHRI) at Kent State University has been created to encourage this type of innovative research into understanding the brain. Established in 2017, the BHRI is already supported by more than 80 investigators across 8 colleges and 20 departments at KSU, as well as affiliated faculty from Akron Children’s Hospital, Northeast Ohio Medical University, and the Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute.

BHRI researchers have wide-ranging expertise in studying the brain and applying their efforts through a diverse set of disciplines, including cell and molecular biology, psychology, humanities, computer programming, language studies, public health, and exercise physiology, to name a few. This broad-based approach is unique to Kent State and permits us to examine traditional issues related to brain health, like protecting against memory loss and developing strategies to help heal the brain, as well as exploring novel topics like empathy or global citizenship.

In addition to these research goals, the BHRI is committed to training the next generation of scientists. By teaching courses, providing handson training in our research labs, and working closely with the surrounding community, we aim to help learners of all ages better understand the brain. If you are interested in learning more, find us at www.kent.edu/brain-health

Dr. Ernest Freeman &
Dr. John Gunstad, Directors

Brain Waves of Tibetan Monks Could Help Students of the West

Brain Waves of Tibetan Monks Could Help Students of the West

Since the time of the early Buddhist kings, Tibetan monks have practiced analytic meditation – where they memorize a Buddhist text and then attempt to deepen their understanding of this material by joining in debate pits led by a senior monk, known as the defender.

Kent State Researchers Help Find Pathologic Hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease In Aged Chimpanzee Brains

Kent State Researchers Help Find Pathologic Hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease In Aged Chimpanzee Brains

Dementia affects one-third of all people older than 65 years in the United States. The most common cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease, a progressive, irreversible brain disease that results in impaired cognitive functioning and other behavioral changes. 

Psychology Professor Studies Link Between Obesity and Cognitive Problems

Psychology Professor Studies Link Between Obesity and Cognitive Problems

Researchers have long known that carrying extra weight can be hard on our bodies; for instance, studies show that obesity is linked to higher rates of heart and liver disease.

Rehabilitation for Aphasia

Rehabilitation for Aphasia

When someone suffers a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or brain tumor, one of the common symptoms is aphasia, a disorder that can impair the expression and understanding of language as well as reading and writing.

Brain Health

Stopping Alzheimer's Before It Starts

For decades, biologists researching a cure for Alzheimer’s disease have remained in the dark almost as much as the those who suffer from the disease.

KSU Biologist Nets Grant To Study Calorie Burning Process

KSU Biologist Nets Grant To Study Calorie Burning Process

Physical activity is essential to fighting obesity, and scientists are constantly working to make it more effective and beneficial.

The Mysteries of the Nervous System

The Mysteries of the Nervous System

How do fingers type these words?
How do eyes read them?
How does the mouth speak, the tongue taste, the skin feel?