Brain Health Research Institute

Two People Standing in Forest, Photo by Magda Ehlers The National Institute of Health (NIH) granted additional funding to Kent State University researcher Karin Coifman, Ph.D., bringing her total award amount to more than $3 million to support her research on mental well-being and coping after traumatic injuries.  Coifman is an associate professor in the university’s Department of Psychological...

Pic of 10 BHRI Fellows 2020 Ten undergraduate students from nine different majors had extraordinary research experiences as Brain Health Research Institute (BHRI) Undergraduate Fellows during summer 2020. These students were part of the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) program at Kent State University, and were selected at the beginning of the summer to be BHRI...

COVID-19 Two members of Kent State University’s Brain Health Research Institute have been awarded grants to begin research on COVID-19 topics. The grants were offered through Case Western Reserve University’s COVID Task Force and multiple funding partners across Case Western Reserve, including the Cleveland Brain Health Initiative, and Kent State’s...

Dr. Earl K. Miller Kent State University has conferred an honorary Doctor of Science degree on alumnus Earl K. Miller, Ph.D., a world-renowned neuroscientist. Miller, BA ’85, is a professor at MIT, and has made pioneering contributions to our understanding of how the brain accomplishes complex cognition, laying the foundation for understanding dysfunctions of the...

Brain Health Research Institute is helping transform the culture of Kent State Kent State University introduced a Bachelor of Science degree in Neuroscience in fall 2019, and since the launch, the major has had tremendous growth. Enrollment is projected to surpass majors that have been at Kent State for years. “We currently have about 45 students enrolled in the major,” said Wilson Chung, Ph.D., associate professor in...

Kent State University Associate Professor of Physics Björn Lüssem, Ph.D., (right) works with Vikash Kaphle, a graduate student (left) in a lab at the Integrated Sciences Building. The medical and science communities are always seeking new ways to study and monitor organs and common diseases to improve human health and quality of life.   While there is a seemingly endless need for versatile, low-cost, yet highly sensitive biochemical sensor devices, there are many steps to take between initial research and clinical...

Associate Professor of Biological Sciences Colleen Novak works in her lab. Scientists have long since established that the effects of stress on our bodies are largely negative. But understanding stress as a trigger for using calories and burning fat also could lead us to better mechanisms for healthier behaviors. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently funded a Kent State University researcher to continue her...

Kent State professor John Gunstad and his research assistants Hanna Schmetzer and Victoria Sanborn demonstrate using the voice pattern technology that is part of his Alzheimer Kent State University psychology professor John Gunstad, Ph.D., has received a grant of nearly $2.6 million from the National Institutes of Health to expand his Alzheimer’s disease research into a national study. Gunstad is studying how speech patterns in older adults can be used as an early detector of Alzheimer’s, the progressive...

Kent State professor John Gunstad and his research assistants Hanna Schmetzer and Victoria Sanborn demonstrate using the voice pattern technology that is part of his Alzheimer       The “C” in “college” might as well stand for “cramming.”​​​​​​​ ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Studies show students are notoriously bad at adopting and adhering consistently to high-impact study habits that help them retain knowledge long-term. Researchers and faculty at Kent...

Senior guard CJ Williamson of the Kent State University men’s basketball team drives to the basket past a University of Akron player. Fans of the Kent State University Golden Flashes looking to follow their favorite players on the court will have to look for their jersey numbers and not their names at a special men’s basketball game later this week. Players will be wearing student-designed uniforms with the space on the back that is usually designated for their names instead...