Department of Physics | 1537474035 | Kent State University

Department of Physics

Veronica Dexheimer

Kent State Astrophysicist Wins NSF Grant to Search for Exotic Matter in Neutron Stars
Kent State University’s only theoretical astrophysicist just landed a grant that will help her to better understand dense stars while encouraging young female scientists to reach for them.

Björn Lussem

NSF Grant to Study Organic Transistors Also May Help Students to Better Understand Physics

While wearable technology is all the rage among high school and college-aged Americans, the average student may not know much about the science behind their high-tech apparel.
A grant from the National Science Foundation will help a Kent State physics professor make progress on both fronts.

While wearable technology is all the rage among high school and college-aged Americans, the average student may not know much about the science behind their high-tech apparel.

Famed science fiction writer and biochemistry professor Isaac Asimov once said, “The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the only one that heralds new discoveries, is not ‘Eureka!’ but rather, ‘Hmm ... that’s funny.’”

Members of Kent State University’s scientific community gathered to celebrate the grand opening of its new, state-of-the-art Integrated Sciences Building on Sept. 15, and they are hoping to hear many more “Hmm … that’s funny” comments coming from their labs, classrooms and hallways for decades to come.

Famed science fiction writer and biochemistry professor Isaac Asimov once said, “The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the only one that heralds new discoveries, is not ‘Eureka!’ but rather, ‘Hmm ... that’s funny.’”

As members of Kent State University’s scientific community gather to celebrate the grand opening of its new, state-of-the-art Integrated Sciences Building on Sept. 15, they’re hoping to hear many more “Hmm … that’s funny” comments coming from their labs, classrooms and hallways for decades to come.

Prashanth Shanmuganathan is one of only two winners to receive a prestigious award for the most outstanding thesis related to research conducted at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York.

Kent State University faculty and students in the Department of Physics, in the College of Arts and Sciences, recently played a key role in using a new silicon detector technology to examine nuclear collisions that recreate the Big Bang on a tiny scale in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, on Long Island. 

A group of researchers in Kent State University's College of Arts and Sciences have published a breakthrough article on new properties of liquid crystals in the May 27 issue of Physical Review Letters. The article, which describes some recent surprising results involving nematic liquid crystals induced by a high magnetic field, is currently featured on the American Physical Society website as an “Editors’ Suggestion.”

Theresa Benyo already had an exciting and fulfilling career as a project manager at NASA. With a great job, a house, a husband, two kids, and hobbies like musical theatre what more could you want? Academically speaking, she’d already earned a dual bachelor’s degree in physics and computer science from Kent State University (1988) and master’s degree in computer science from Case Western Reserve University (1995). But, for her, there was still something missing.

Photo of Maxim DzeroMaxim Dzero, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics in Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences, has been granted $302,796 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for his project titled “Spins and Knots: The Rise of Topology in F-Orbital Materials.” The focus of this project is to conduct theoretical research aimed at better understanding elect

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