Division of Research and Sponsored Programs

Depression is the leading cause of ill health and disability worldwide. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 300 million people are currently living with depression.

New funding will support student research and curriculum expansion efforts in Kent State University’s School of Fashion Design and Merchandising.

With stress levels on the rise and mental health being one of the most crucial issues in public health today, Kent State University is hosting the Brain Health Summit on Wednesday, Feb. 21, to share the importance of a healthy brain. The event is presented by Kent State’s Division for Research and Sponsored Programs and Kent State of Wellness, a university-wide effort that promotes a culture of health and wellness for students and employees at all Kent State campuses.

 

You have likely seen one at an aquarium. It is the friendly creature with the oversized head that swims up to the glass with what looks like a smile on its face. Beluga whales are extremely social mammals that are often called sea canaries because of their high-pitched chatter, or melonheads for the enlarged and flexible area above their eyes that creates facial expressions. These distinguishing features of the beluga whale make up just some of its unique characteristics.

Biological anthropology researchers in Kent State University’s College of Arts and Sciences have again shed new light on the very old topic of human origins.

In two new journal articles appearing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers report likely explanations for the evolution of human social behavior and unparalleled intelligence. The human lineage is characterized by remarkable demographic success relative to our nearest relatives and by advanced social traits such as language, empathy, and altruism.

Recent research has uncovered that up to 5 percent of the DNA of many modern humans originated from ancient interbreeding with Neanderthal populations. This raises the broader question of whether a species’ genetic makeup includes genes brought together through occasional episodes of hybridization. Are we an amalgamation of DNA from a variety of interbreeding species? Did such hybridization happen throughout the 7 million years of human evolution? “Occasionally,” said Anthony J.

A pair of Kent State University geographers have teamed up to secure two research grants totaling more than $550,000 for separate projects to study climate change and weather patterns.

The conditions in Lake Erie continue to pose several health risks to Ohioans in coastal communities, making it difficult to maintain good water quality for citizens, state and local policymakers.

The Organization for the Study of Communication, Language and Gender (OSCLG) held its 40th annual conference, themed “40 Shades of Purple: Four Decades of Feminisms,” Oct. 5 – 8 in Omaha, Neb. 

Electroencephalogram (EEG) caps are helping Kent State University researchers unlock the secrets of the mind.

Pages