Science of Learning and Education Center

Science is complex, and it’s difficult to discuss it with children under the best circumstances; it’s even more difficult when they are hungry. Two Kent State University researchers may have cooked up a way to solve both of those problems, and the National Science Foundation just awarded them a three-year, $1.3 million grant to determine if their recipe works.

While most can agree that STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) experiences outside of school can be exciting and engaging for young people, there is much that isn’t known about its impact on short-term and long-term learning. How can it best be connected to what students are learning in school? How can young people have equitable opportunities to access quality informal science education? How do you measure this kind of learning?

Kent State University’s Science of Learning and Education (SOLE) Center will host “Improving Student Achievement: A Summit on Learning and Education” at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center in Kent, Ohio, on Oct. 9-10. Researchers from across the country (and one from Australia) in the fields of cognitive and educational psychology will present their cutting-edge work on evidence-based approaches to improving student achievement.

Kent State University’s Science of Learning and Education (SOLE) Center will host “Improving Student Achievement: A Summit on Learning and Education” at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center in Kent, Ohio, on Oct. 9-10. Researchers from across the country (and one from Australia) in the fields of cognitive and educational psychology will present their cutting-edge work on evidence-based approaches to improving student achievement.