National Science Foundation | 1542285076 | Kent State University

National Science Foundation

U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan has announced $3,723,765 in federal research grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Science Foundation to be awarded to Kent State University.

While wearable technology is all the rage among high school and college-aged Americans, the average student may not know much about the science behind their high-tech apparel.

If you compare the fields of medicine and education you would find that the former bases its practices on empirical scientific research whereas education is mainly driven by intuition. However, cognitive psychology researchers at Kent State University who investigate student achievement are trying to change this reality.

How different are human brains compared to the brains of other primates such as chimpanzees, gorillas and monkeys? It’s one of many important questions that scientists have asked for years while pursuing a better understanding of human evolution.

Jonathan Maletic, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Computer Science in the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University, has received a three-year, $290,610 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to help support basic research on how programmers write and develop large-scale software systems.

His project “An Infrastructure That Combines Eye Tracking Into Integrated Development Environments to Study Software Development and Program Comprehension,” or more simply, iTrace, will help grow the applications of eye-tracking software.

Several Kent State University professors in the College of Arts and Sciences have been selected to receive Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF). REU grants are designed to provide faculty with funding to create research positions and experiences specifically for undergraduate students. These students typically come from two- or four-year institutions that may not provide access to many research opportunities.

Kent State University students in the College of Arts and Sciences will get the opportunity to travel to Japan to do collaborative research in a world-class institute, specializing in primate biology, thanks to a recently signed memorandum of understanding with the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University. By studying primates as a model for humans, the researchers hope to address a variety of topics, including evolutionary genetic analysis, Alzheimer’s disease and aggressive behavior.      

Thanks to a $100,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, two Kent State University professors are researching climate change in Alaska. Elizabeth Herndon, Ph.D., and Lauren Kinsman-Costello, Ph.D., assistant professors from Kent State’s College of Arts and Sciences, spent a week in Fairbanks, Alaska, in June studying how climate change affects the availability of plant nutrients in arctic and sub-arctic ecosystems.

The grant teams up two of Kent State’s newest researchers.

Educators, scientists and technologists from Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Kent State University and Cleveland Metroparks have partnered to develop a new learning app that is now live and freely available on iTunes. The app, called ParkApps, features a number of different resources aimed at educating park visitors as they run, hike and bike through the parks.

Educators, scientists, and technologists from the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Kent State University and Cleveland Metroparks have partnered to develop a new learning app that is now live and freely available on iTunes. 

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