climate change

Chelsea Smith (left) and Jordyn Stoll (right) were selected for a Department of Energy Graduate Student Research Program Two Kent State University students, in the College of Arts and Sciences, were among 62 students from 50 different U.S. universities recently selected for funding by the Department of Energy’s Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program.   Chelsea E. Smith and Jordyn T. Stoll, both pursuing a Ph.D. in Ecology from the Department...

A rift along the Larsen C ice shelf from the vantage point of NASA Scientists report that nearly 14,600 years ago marine-based regions of the Eurasian Ice Sheet melted rapidly, contributing to a major sea-level rise. Does this rapid collapse of massive ice give us clues as to the vulnerability of Earth’s remaining ice sheets? Joseph D. Ortiz, Ph.D., professor and assistant chair in the College of Arts and...

A rift along the Larsen C ice shelf from the vantage point of NASA Scientists report that nearly 14,600 years ago marine-based regions of the Eurasian Ice Sheet melted rapidly, contributing to a major sea-level rise. Does this rapid collapse of massive ice give us clues as to the vulnerability of Earth’s remaining ice sheets? Joseph D. Ortiz, Ph.D., professor and assistant chair in the College of Arts and...

Harmful algal bloom in Lake Erie, Sept. 4, 2009. NOAA/Flickr Have you ever seen the “nasty green slime” – properly known as a harmful algal bloom, or HAB in Lake Erie? Remember the July 31, 2014 “Do Not Drink/Do Not Boil” public health warning messages in Toledo? Tests revealed that the algae was producing microcystin, a sometimes deadly liver toxin and suspected carcinogen. Experts say that...

Lauren Kinsman-Costello, assistant professor of biological sciences at Kent State, stands in a field in the arctic circle, in Sweden. In early February, scientists reported the hottest temperature on record in Antarctica: 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Studies show climate change is disproportionately affecting the poles, warming them faster than anywhere else on Earth, and raising questions about what kinds of changes we can expect in arctic ecosystems as temperatures rise. 
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An image of the globe over North America, showing increased warm weather in a yellow-to-red scale Research into the air masses that drive changes in our day-to-day weather has been limited by land-based and regional studies, leaving wide gaps in our understanding of these impactful phenomena. A new paper by a Kent State University geographer has just filled in most of those gaps. In August, the...

An image of the globe over North America, showing increased warm weather in a yellow-to-red scale The greenhouse effect is one of the most widely known causes of global climate change. It is currently caused by an excess of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere due to burning of fossil fuels. Some natural processes can help slow climate change by removing CO2 from the atmosphere. For example, plants filter CO2 out of air and transfer carbon...

Daniel Grossman is an award-winning print journalist and radio and web producer with 20 years of experience. Daniel Grossman, Ph.D., an award-winning journalist and radio/web producer with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, visited Kent State University recently to share his professional experiences with students, faculty and community members. Grossman was one of three panelists who spoke at the Kent State School of Communication Studies (COMM)...

School of Communication Studies

Daniel Grossman is an award-winning print journalist and radio and web producer with 20 years of experience. Typically held each fall and spring semester, the School of Communication Studies hosts the Global Communication Issues Forum in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting to address the global effect of a topic and how it is communicated to a world-wide audience by the media. Reporters from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting...