Department of Geography

Ideastream Where you live could determine how long you live. It is a struggle for many living in the inner city where residents often fear for their safety. To better understand the impact that fear has on mental and physical health, Ideastream's Sound of Ideas talked with local experts, including Andrew Curtis, Ph.D., co-director of the GIS | Health &...

Division of Research & Sponsored Programs

Kent State Uses Geospatial Technology to Map Violence The Kent State University Geographic Information System (GIS) Health & Hazards Lab is teaming up with the city of Akron, Ohio to better understand the impact violence has on children in the city. In doing so, the group is working together to discover, develop and deploy solutions to the violence. Kent State’s GIS|Health and Hazards Lab...

Kent State Uses Geospatial Technology to Map Violence The Kent State University Geographic Information System (GIS) Health & Hazards Lab is teaming up with the city of Akron, Ohio to better understand the impact violence has on children in the city. In doing so, the group is working together to discover, develop and deploy solutions to the violence. Kent State’s GIS|Health and Hazards Lab...

The theme for this year The fourth annual Water and Land Symposium at Kent State University will be held Oct. 5-6 at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center in downtown Kent, Ohio. This year, the symposium is co-sponsored by Kent State’s College of Arts and Sciences and the Cleveland Water Alliance. The event is free and open to the public, but...

James Tyner, Ph.D., professor in Kent State’s Department of Geography, discusses his research in his office. Scholar of the Month James Tyner Professor College of Arts and Sciences 1997-present Selecting a single renowned scholar from Kent State University’s largest college is not an easy undertaking, but the work of Geography Professor James Tyner, Ph.D., over the past year made the decision a little bit easier for the College of Arts and Sciences...

James Tyner, Ph.D., professor in Kent State’s Department of Geography, discusses his research in his office. Science teacher Richard Dudley of Coventry Local Schools’ Coventry High School is the $20,000 Ohio winner of the 2015-16 Samsung Solve for Tomorrow contest. Dudley and his STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) elective students designed an innovative STEM project that they are bringing to life through a video and website. Contest...

James Tyner, Ph.D., professor in Kent State’s Department of Geography, discusses his research in his office. We have all seen them explode on social media. They are the posts that feature the outlandish, the cute and the funny messages that go viral.     But how does one message catch on and others do not? It is a question that Kent State University researchers in the College of Arts and Sciences are trying to answer, but as it relates to more...

James Tyner, Ph.D., professor in Kent State’s Department of Geography, discusses his research in his office. The third annual Water Research Symposium at Kent State University will be held Oct. 14-15 at the Kent State University Hotel and Conference Center in downtown Kent, Ohio. This year, the symposium is co-sponsored by the National Academy of Science with additional support from the Cleveland Water Alliance. The event is free and open to the public....

James Tyner, Ph.D., professor in Kent State’s Department of Geography, discusses his research in his office. Kent State University Geography Professor Andrew Curtis and his doctoral student Laura Schuch, in the College of Arts and Sciences, have developed mapping approaches that can help predict neighborhood lead exposure in children which continues to be a health concern in older neighborhoods, including several in Akron, Ohio.  For two years,...

James Tyner, Ph.D., professor in Kent State’s Department of Geography, discusses his research in his office. A decade ago this week, Andrew Curtis, Ph.D., geography professor in Kent State’s College of Arts and Sciences, promised the people of New Orleans that he would continue to return and document the recovery efforts following Hurricane Katrina. After the hurricane, Curtis used specialized cameras, equipped with GPS, to help direct rescue...