National Institutes of Health | 1550855768 | Kent State University

National Institutes of Health

People who suffer trauma will, with few exceptions, never forget what happened to them, but a Kent State University researcher may be able to offer them the hope of living without constant fear and anxiety.

Heather Caldwell, Ph.D., a professor in Kent State University’s Department of Biological Sciences, recently received a $450,000 grant to study the role that oxytocin plays in the developing brain.

Labeled by some as “the bonding hormone,” oxytocin is well known for helping pregnant mothers with uterine contraction while in labor, milk letdown while breastfeeding and a feeling of euphoria when cuddling with their infants. But, there is still much that researchers do not know about how this hormone works in the brains of children.

It could be argued that no science is more valuable to us than that which helps to ensure the survival of our species by solving the problems that challenge it.

It could be argued that no science is more valuable to us than that which helps to ensure the survival of our species by solving the problems that challenge it.

Photo of Min-Ho KimThe National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded Kent State University’s Min-Ho Kim, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences, a $1,842,350 five-year grant.