Course offerings are subject to change and may vary each summer.  The following summer 2020 classes are open to all students.  Most classes have no prerequisites, but check the catalog or talk with an advisor for details.  Be sure to meet with your academic advisor to discuss which courses are best fit with the requirements for your major. 

Italian Language

ITAL 15201 Elementary Italian I

Course Name: ITAL 15201 Elementary Italian I

Description: An introduction to the Italian language in the context of Italian culture.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

ITAL 25202 Intermediate Italian II

Course Name: ITAL 25202 Intermediate Italian II

Description: Continuation of ITAL 25201 and speaking, listening, reading and writing skills using a variety of cultural materials.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Italian 25201 or permission

Open to all students prerequisite.

Aeronautics & Engineering

AERN 45791 Aviation Security/Policy

Course Name: AERN 45791 Aviation Security/Policy

Description: Examines policies, practices, procedures and regulatory provisions developed to create and enhance security in civil aviation with a special emphasis on airlines, airports, airspace and agencies responsible for civil aviation security.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: AERN 45250

AERN 45153 Aviation Safety Theory

Course Name: AERN 45153 Aviation Safety Theory

Description: This course provides an introduction to safety theories, models, and systems. This will include discussion about specific accidents and applications of those theories and models to real life situations.  

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None

AERN 45130 Physiology and Human Factors of Flight

Course Name: AERN 45130 Physiology and Human Factors of Flight

Description: This course provides a study of the interaction of the human body with flight and those human factors that affect flight operations. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None

Arts

ARTH 42095 The Golden Age of Italian Art

Course Name: ARTH 42095 The Golden Age of Italian Art

Description: This course will explore the development of art and architecture in Italy from the late Middle Ages to the Roman Baroque period. Through an in- depth analysis of the art and history of these periods, we shall develop an understanding of Italy’s role in the overall development of Western civilization. Particular emphasis will be given to Florentine Art. Florence exhibits to this day a particularly well-integrated conception of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Taking advantage of this, we will use the city as our classroom in order to examine the development of Florentine art and architecture in context. In addition to “on-site” lectures, classroom lectures will focus on the art produced in other major Italian cities.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

MUS 22111 Understanding Music or MUS 40295 Music in Florence & Italy

Course Name:  MUS 22111 Understanding Music

Description:  This section of Understanding Music will survey the history of Western music using Florence as the backdrop.  It will connect music with the history of Florence allowing students to gain an understanding of music through live concerts, visits to museums, and by studying the numerous links between Florence's art, architecture, and music.  Students have the opportunity to attend concerts from a variety of periods including a full-length opera.  Understanding Music is a Kent Core-Fine Arts course.

Note: This course is offered through the Stark Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the Stark Campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

 

Credit Hours: 3

 

Prerequisites: None

MUS 42165 History of Contemporary Popular Music or MUS 40295 Rock History

Course Name: MUS 42165 History of Contemporary Popular Music

Description: A study of popular music from the 1950s to the present. Course content will highlight significant artists, examine important style elements, and expose students to a variety of repertoire. This course will emphasize music theory and orchestration to understand and differentiate style. An overview of the history and development of recording technology is an important component of this course. 

Note: This course is offered through the Stark Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the Stark Campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: MUS 21341

Fashion

FDM 35091 Italian Fashion and Culture

Course Name: FDM 35091 Italian Fashion and Culture

Description: Evolution of the fashion industry in post World War II Italy. Study of the creators, design and production processes creating one of the most successful unions of commercial product and cultural expression world-wide.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: FDM 35900

FDM 45592 Italian Study Tour

Course Name: FDM 45592 Italian Study Tour

Description: The course aims to explore and develop a critical awareness on fashion trends in Italy. It focuses on the major centers of Italian fashion business showing and analyzing where the trends are displayed, who are the trendsetters, and how the trends are spread eventually becoming a reality. On-site visits to major Italian fashion centers are a vital component of the course. Places to be explored include: design and fashion houses, small and medium fashion firms, showrooms, fashion archives, ateliers, workshops, private and public museums and collections, art galleries, retail stores, buying offices, and other areas of the fashion industry and Italian art and culture. Visits to art exhibitions will provide a broad idea of the social changes occurring and how artists reflects or anticipate these trends that will then influence fashion. In class introductory lectures give students the tools to face on site visits with a critical approach, follow up meetings based on critical discussions, debates, oral and written reports, presentations allow to share the knowledge. Through seminars professional guest speakers will deepen specific topics of interest.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  

Arts and Sciences

BSCI 40195 Feasts and Plagues: the Science of Italian Food, Wine and Disease

Course Name:  BSCI 40195 Feasts and Plagues: the Science of Italian Food, Wine and Disease

Course Description: TBD 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: TBD 

BSCI 40195 Science in the Renaissance

Course Name:  BSCI 40195 Science in the Renaissance 

Description: The impact of the Renaissance extends beyond culture and art to the sciences with advances in physics, biology, medicine, geography, and engineering.  Florence provides an ideal setting to study how scientific discoveries are made and the scientific process.  From Galileo to da Vinci, the role of Florence as the heart of the Renaissance is clear and, for this class, the city provides an ideal venue for learning how scientific questions are posed and answered.  Scientific concepts will be viewed through multiple lens to gain understanding of the scientific process and our ways of knowing.  Students will experience this first hand through field trips, museum visits and walking tours.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

CLAS 21405 The Roman Achievement

Course Name:  CLAS 21405 The Roman Achievement

Description: This course is an introduction to the history and culture of the Roman world, from the origins of Rome through its ascent to domination of the Mediterranean world, the troubled changes from Republic to Empire, and the flourishing of the city and its provinces during the Imperial period until its crisis and consequent fall during the 4th-5th centuries AD. Political and military organizations, religious beliefs towards life and death, social identity, entertainment, private life, familial relationships, sexuality and the changes of these assets and values throughout time are examined in this course by means of the most recent archaeological and historical approaches and debates. As we search together to unravel the historical, cultural and social significance of the Roman achievement, primary sources in translation will be used to provide a fresh look of how some political events were perceived, how Roman urban life and its agents were captured by the satirical descriptions of Juvenal and Martial,  and how such a catastrophic event such as the eruption of the Vesuvius affected writers such as Pliny and Seneca.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Kent Core Humanities

Open to all students.

ENG 41292 TEFL Practicum

Course Name: ENG 41292 TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) Practicum

Description: The practicum exposes students to hands-on training through classroom observations, assisting, and teaching their own classes in various contexts in Florence, Italy. Students will observe and assist teachers at preschool, elementary school, middle school, high school, and/or university. At times, it is possible to customize students' practicum schedule to meet their educational goals (e.g., gaining experience teaching young children).  

Prerequisites: ENG 31007

Credit Hours: 3-6 

HIST Goodfellas, Godfathers and Sopranos: The Image of Italian American Immigrants in Film and Literature

Course Name:  HIST Goodfellas, Godfathers and Sopranos: The Image of Italian American Immigrants in Film and Literature

Description: This course explores the historical representations of linguistic, social, and cultural contexts of Italian and Italian-American immigrants from the late 19th century to the present. We will examine the historical context of literature and film as a mode of cultural representation with a focus on the following topics: assimilation; the centrality and importance of the family unit, the rise of organized crime; social codes used by the mafia (honor and silence); gender roles and stereotypes; and the modern, creative re-imagining of the “American Dream” as seen through the perspective of the shared challenges and traditions of Italian immigrants.  Texts will include Mario Puzo’s "The Fortunate Pilgrim," Helen Barolini’s "Umbertina," Pietro di Donato’s "Christ in Concrete" and "Vita" by Melania Mazzucco. These primary sources will be used to discuss the construction of historical memory and identity in Italian-Americans and its significance to modern U.S. history. A close comparison between the images of Italian-Americans in these novels to their counterparts in film will include a study of  Francis Ford Coppola’s "The Godfather," Martin Scorsese’s "Goodfellas," Sergio Leone’s "Once Upon a Time in America" and the hit TV show "The Sopranos." 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

HIST 38195 Italian Mafia

Course Name: HIST 38195 Italian Mafia

Description: This course analyzes the infamous criminal organizations of Italy from their origins to their evolution as an intrinsic part of Italian, and global, history. The relationship between Mafia and politics, its internal rules and codes, its business activities, and its deep connection to the society and the culture of Sicily and the Italian South are some of the important aspects that are examined in depth. Through current literature and media the international reach of the Italian Mafia and its effect on the collective imagination will be examined. The relationship and differences between the Italian and the American Mafia will also be an important component of the course.  In the historical introduction, the origins of the Sicilian Mafia will be explained in the context of the Italian Unification, as well as the development of the Mafia from its agrarian origins to its infiltration into the political realm of the Italian State. The rebirth and transformation of the Mafia after its suppression during World War II is an important historical turning point, one which ultimately led to the institutionalization of the fight against the Mafia, which will also be analyzed from both a political and cultural perspective. Contemporary Mafia activity and its expansion by Italian Mafia organizations, such as the Calabrian ‘Ndrangheta and the Neapolitan Camorra, will be studied after the presentation of the Mafia’s history.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

HIST 38395 Florence: The Myth of a City

Course Name:  HIST 38395 Florence The Myth of a City

Description: This course explores the dynastic control that the infamous Medici family exerted over every aspect of Florentine life. It explores their rise to power, from the revolutionary and cunning tactics of Cosimo de’ Medici, to the rich vision of Lorenzo “Il Magnifico”, to Anna Maria Luisa’s efforts to establish the Medici legacy forever in the city of Florence. Learn about the extraordinary cast of characters ushered into fame by the Medici, including Michelangelo, Galileo, Botticelli, Machiavelli and many more. Through an examination of this influential family, their methods of persuasion and power are revealed, which extended far beyond the boundaries of Florence to the papacy and into all corners of Europe. This is your chance not simply to learn about the Medici but to explore the sites where their history and that of the Florentine Renaissance unfolded: the palaces, churches, villas and their art collections, forming together a uniquely complete surviving legacy of their achievements. Illustrated class discussions and site visits to selected museums and galleries will also help you to unravel the cultural interests of the family’s most important figures and their relationship with landmark artists.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

JWST The Italian Jewish Experience

Course Name: JWST The Italian Jewish Experience

Description: This course will present the specificity of the Italian Jewish experience in the twentieth and 21st centuries through a variety of texts, documents, media, and field trips. We will explore the various aspects of the unique Jewish culture in Italy as it is today and learn how it developed through the centuries. The initial focus will be on understanding the structure of the Jewish community, including religious organization, life cycle events and the vocabulary of Jewish life. Short stories and novels by some of Italy's most eminent writers will constitute the backbone of a course that will analyze the Italian Jews' role and reactions to Fascist persecution, deportations to Nazi concentration camps, and homecoming in the aftermath of the Holocaust.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

MATH 10041 Introductory Statistics

Course Name: MATH 10041 Introductory Statistics

Description: (Equivalent to MATH 10040) An introduction to statistical thinking and statistical methods. Emphasis is on statistical literacy, conceptual understanding and active learning in the classroom. No credit earned for this course if a student already earned credit for MATH 10040.

Note: This course is offered through the Trumbull Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the Trumbull Campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites: Minimum 22 ACT math score; or minimum 530 SAT math score; or minimum 35 ALEKS Math score; or MATH 00022 with a minimum C grade; or any higher level MATH course.

PACS 11001 Into to Conflict Management

Course Name: PACS 11001 Into to Conflict Management

Description: Our lives are surrounded and defined by different forms of conflict, from the interpersonal to the international kind. Inspired by a vision of social justice and engagement, this class is designed to train students manage and transform conflicts constructively. With a little practice, we all can become assertive problem-solvers, firm but fair negotiators, effective mediators, and when necessary, initiators of nonviolent action and social change (think #BlackLivesMatter, #MeToo, Hong Kong protests). Our time in Florence would be a good opportunity to explore some local issues that ail Italy and Europe (national identity; migrant crisis; rise of authoritarian politics, etc.) and the rest of the world. This is a Kent core course and will likely involve field trips in Florence. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

PSYC Body Image in the 21st Century

Course Name: PSYC Body Image in the 21st Century 

Description: 

Credit Hours:

Prerequisites:

Business

BUS 30234 International Business

Course Name: BUS 30234 International Business

Description: This course provides an introduction to different environments, theories and practices of international business. This course is designed for all students interested in international business, regardless of their principal academic discipline. Topics covered include globalization; international companies; sustainability; the impact and importance of culture; economic, financial, social, political environments; global strategies and structures; international marketing and entry modes. In order to facilitate these goals, students are expected to prepare, present their views, and actively participate in classroom discussions. The course provides a broad survey of the theoretical and practical aspects of management practice in Europe, introducing you the major financial, economic and socio – economic, physical, socio – cultural political, labor, competitive and distributive forces that characterize business in Europe. The course will help you to develop an increased awareness of the differences between European and North American business practices, and a better grasp of the impact of differences in business practices on the conduct of business internationally. The emphasis in this course is both on understanding and applying one’s knowledge of different management practices, using national cultures as an aid to understanding the evolution of various management practices.
We begin by analyzing the international business environment that connects the phenomenon of globalization with the national and cultural differences that characterize the countries in this economy. Next we will analyze, how to first define a strategy to enter foreign markets, select then a global company structure, and define a global marketing and pricing strategies. We will delve into some strategic and functional issues that characterize the management of organizations in the global marketplace.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: ECON 22060 or ECON 22061

Open to all students with prerequisites.

ECON 42295 ST in Economics: Brexit, Migrants, Trade and the EU

Course Name: ECON 42295 ST in Economics: Brexit, Migrants, Trade and the EU

Description: This course will examine current issues in the European Union, including Brexit, immigration, health care, poverty and inequality.  The historical development and structure of the EU will also be covered and the role of cultural influences will be explored.  The course will also include visits to organizations related to the issues at hand.  Prior knowledge of economics is not required.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

MKTG 45060 International Marketing

Course Name: MKTG 45060  International Marketing

Description: The course provides a comprehensive overview of international marketing issues characterizing international companies in foreign markets. It will introduce students to the international markets and the principles underlying the development and implementation of marketing strategies across and within foreign countries. Topics include: political, cultural, and legal environmental changes as new competitive challenges for companies involved in international businesses, international marketing strategies (domestic market expansion, multi-domestic marketing, and global marketing), multicultural marketing researches, international segmentation and competitive positioning, and international marketing mix in terms of product, distribution, communication and price decisions. During lessons the students are expected to prepare, present their views, and actively participate in classroom. In order to facilitate their participation, lessons include discussions of cases and the viewing of videos on international marketing experiences. The course is designed to stimulate curiosity about international marketing practices of companies, which seek global market opportunities and to raise the student's consciousness about the importance of an international marketing perspective in the international business management.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: MKTG 25010 or BMRT 21050 or MKTG 35035

Open to all students with prerequisites.

Communication and Information

CCI 40095 Italian Cinema

Course Name: CCI 40095 Italian Cinema

Description: The course introduces the student to the world of Italian Cinema. In the first part the class will be analyzing Neorealism, a cinematic phenomenon that deeply influenced the ideological and aesthetic rules of film art. In the second part we will concentrate on the films that mark the decline of Neorealism and the talent of ‘new’ auteurs such as Fellini and Antonioni. The last part of the course will be devoted to the cinema from 1970s to the present in order to pay attention to the latest developments of the Italian industry. The course is a general analysis of post-war cinema and a parallel social history of this period using films as ‘decoded historical evidence’. Together with masterpieces such as Open City the screenings will include films of the Italian directors of  the ‘cinema d’autore’ such as Life is Beautiful and the 2004 candidate for the Oscar for Best Foreign Film, I Am Not Scared. The class will also analyze the different aspects of filmmaking both in Italian and the U.S. industry where I had the pleasure to work for many years in the editing department on films such as Dead Poets Society and The Godfather: Part III. The films in DVD format are dubbed in English or sub-titled.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

COMM 35852 Intercultural Communication

Course Name: COMM 35852 Intercultural Communication

Description: In the contemporary world characterized by globalization of goods, people and ideas, and by growing processes of internal diversification, intercultural competences are necessary requirements for every individual both for personal and professional life. Intercultural Communication deals with the relevance of difference (not only among cultures but also within a culture) that is approached both as a threat and as a resource. In our everyday experience the continuous reference to the ‘other’ (ethical, religious, political, gendered etc) is used to build up the very sense of our identities and in so doing dividing the world among ‘us’ and ‘them’, ‘bad’ and ‘good’, ‘friends’ and ‘enemies’. Diversity compels us to reflect upon our values, and the taken-for-grantedness of the social world in which we live. This course will move from the social constructivist approach trying to combine together sociology, cultural anthropology, and media studies investigating the role that diversity plays in our every-day life and the importance to acquire an intercultural communication approach in order to be more effective in our processes of communication, to solve conflicts and to better understand the interactions among individuals, institutions and cultures. Theories, concepts and problems will be presented through lectures and audiovisual materials. Interaction is strongly required and will be stimulated. Students will be invited to take part in the classes commenting on the topics presented, offering opinions, surveying and practicing ‘problem solving’.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

Education, Health, and Human Services

EDST 40095 Leadership

Course Name: EDST 40095 Leadership

Description: Against the back drop of beautiful Florence, Italy, students will have an opportunity to explore traits and skills of effective leadership across a variety of fields.  This class will explore leadership as it is manifested in Florence’s art, politics, business, and educational realms, together with reflection on American culture and how it may compare and contrast with respect to the basic tenets of leadership. Healthy and effective leadership skills, for both personal and professional life, will be explored and practiced.  Students studying in any discipline will benefit from the exploration of their own leadership style and how it may relate to what is demonstrated in the many facets of Florence’s rich arts and culture.  With this opportunity to explore and reflect on their own leadership potential, students will also be provided with the occasion to improve and enhance their leadership abilities to better serve them, and others, in their chosen field of study. Activities each week will aid in the exploration of a multitude of leadership qualities and skills.  Resources of Florence and KSU FSI will be tapped to enhance student learning by way of hands-on activities.
Skills learned in this course will serve students in a whole host of professional settings. Students’ personal lives may also be enhanced by the application of learned leadership attributes

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

ETEC 47495/67405 Social Media, Gaming and Extended Realities for Globalized Learning

Course Name: ETEC 47495/67405 Social Media, Gaming and Extended Realities for Globalized Learning

Description: Technology has radically transformed how we teach and learn in the 21st century. It has changed what content we have access to, how that content is delivered, the types of teachers and learners we engage with, and the contexts in which we learn.  Where learning once meant a face-to-face classroom with an instructor giving a lecture, learning now occurs online, in augmented and virtual worlds, with tools ranging from smartphones to drones, with classmates around the world, and in both formal and information environments (e.g., museums and parks). The purpose of this class is two-fold. We will simultaneously: 1) explore the ways in which we get access to information and learn from media like smartphones, social media, gaming, esports, and extended realities; and, 2) use that learning to set the stage to become producers of content for global consumption.  The class will capitalize on the Italian context with field trips to learn and capture content for creation of student materials.  Additionally, students will explore cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary aspects of technology consumption and production.  This course is applicable for anyone interested in teaching and learning across the lifespan in contexts in and outside of traditional education.  Students will learn theory and practice; they will also explore software products and leave the course with products for dissemination. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

HDFS 41095/51095 Trauma, Crisis and Resiliency: A Global Perspective

Course Name:  HDFS 41095/51095 Trauma, Crisis and Resiliency: A Global Perspective

Course Description: This seminar serves as an introduction to trauma and crisis and how it looks different across cultures. It includes content concerning: neurobiological and psychosocial development impacted by trauma and crisis; history of trauma and crisis; the nature of trauma (sexual abuse, combat, and natural disasters); and how trauma affects individuals, families, and systems.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None; open to all students. 

Graduate students should register for HDFS 51095

HDFS 41095/51095 Career Development in College and Beyond: A Global View

Course Name: HDFS 41095 Career Development in College and Beyond: A Global View

Description: This course serves as an introduction to career development from a global perspective. Course content includes: self and occupational awareness via assessments and experiential exploration; academic and career decision-making; strategies for making study abroad career-enhancing; sources for learning about employment practices which differ by region/country; and paths to global careers. Students will reflect on their past, present, and future career lifespan and learn about the working world as a context where development takes place. Students from all majors should find this course valuable and applicable to their future career goals.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None - open to all students

Graduate students should register for HDFS 51095

HDFS 42092 Love, Marriage, and Family: Florence

Course Name:  HDFS 42092 Love, Marriage, and Family: Florence 

Course Description: The course explores the concepts of love, marriage, and family of Florence and Tuscany using the city as our classroom. In this course, we’ll explore how historical family honor, rituals, culture, and social context continue to influence the modern Florentine family. Students will engage in naturalistic observation of modern Florentine couples and families and explore historic family honor and power through art and fashion. We’ll work to identify family rituals and traditions passed down from the Roman empire at Roman ruins and explore how modern policies and culture influence love, relationships, and family. In short, we want to understand what makes the modern Florentine family and understand how those families function.

Note: This course is offered through the Stark Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the Stark Campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

HDFS 42092 Millennials and Gen Z: Life in Italy

Course Name:  HDFS 42092 Millennials and Gen Z: Life in Italy

Course Description: Explore and experience what growing up in Italy is like through the lens of culture, policy and practice. Most class periods will be spent visiting and observing historical sites, schools, non-profit agencies, and everyday life while considering the influence of education, religion, and state policy on childhood and adolescent outcomes. Students will have the opportunity to actively engage with Florentines in a brief in-country volunteer experience.

Note: This course is offered through the Stark Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the Stark Campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None 

HM 33031 Food, Wine and Beverage Pairing

Course Name: HM 33031 Food, Wine and Beverage Pairing

Description: This course provides students with knowledge of the sensory relationship of Food, Wine, Beer and Spirits, and the important role this process has on Hospitality Operations. Course topics will include developing an understanding of wine, beer and food pairing as a hierarchical process, Old and New World traditions, and traditional and non-traditional gastronomic pairings. Menu development and cooking play an important role in this class.  Food and Beverage are the two most importance facets of restaurant operations.  Furthermore, the growth and interest in this area has been suggested as a reaction to the “homogenizing influence of globalization” with customers seeking unique eating and drinking experiences. To respond to these trends, hospitality firms as well as hospitality training and education need to move beyond basic practical courses or training focusing solely on business issues to training that reflects the growing interest in unique experiences by the hospitality industry.

*This course has an additional course fee of $300 per student. Students must be 21 years of age or older to enroll

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None