Florence Summer Institute 2022 Courses 

Course offerings are subject to change and may vary each summer.

The following Summer 2022 courses are open to all students, unless otherwise noted.  Most courses have no prerequisites, but it is important that students check the catalog for course details.  Be sure to meet with your academic advisor to discuss course options and review which courses may be the best fit to fulfill requirements for your degree.

June Session Courses

ANTH 48889/58889 FACES: Human Head Anatomy with a Forensic Art Focus

Course Name: ANTH 48889/58889 FACES:  Human Head Anatomy with a Forensic Art Focus

Description: Our course begins with studying works by Renaissance artist/anatomists to gain an appreciation for how well they understood human anatomy. We also visit La Specola Anatomical Collection (exquisite wax models copied from real corpses during the 17th century). In the classroom students study human skulls and learn the form and function of the muscles of facial expression and mastication. We pay close attention to features of the skull that ultimately give each face its unique qualities and study the areas that indicate age and sex of the individual. Each student will sculpt the facial bones of a skull, using an exact replica cast as a model. Students learn the techniques of two-dimensional forensic facial reconstruction. Using knowledge of head anatomy, and tissue depth data from the literature, each student will prepare detailed sketches (one man, one woman) based on photographs of the skulls. We also learn how to age-progress images of young adults.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None

BSCI 30789 Feasts and Plagues: the Science of Italian Food, Wine and Disease

Course Name:  BSCI 30789 Feasts and Plagues: the Science of Italian Food, Wine and Disease

Course Description: This course explores the microbial mechanisms responsible for plagues such as the Black Death as well as for their positive roles in food and wine production. These costs and benefits are explored in Florence, Italy since each is ingrained in the city's history, culture, art, and biology. Course activities include food and wine tastings and field trips to historical sites and museums in Florence and Siena. This course is designed to appeal to students with a wide array of interests in human health and society. Students will analyze genomes of microbes responsible for human disease, discuss ecological and biological factors associated with disease transmission, construct cemetery life tables, discuss the impacts of disease on Italian art, architecture, and culture, master knowledge of the fermentation process, and compare and contrast the microbiomes and environments of vineyards in Tuscany vs. California.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

BSCI 40195 Beauty and the Brain: Exploring Florence Through the Senses

Course Name:  BSCI 40195 Beauty and the Brain: Exploring Florence Through the Senses

Course Description: This is an introductory sensory neuroscience course for undergraduate students from varied academic backgrounds. By exploring the sensory richness of Florence, students will delve into the biology of their sensory systems. Through a combination of fieldtrips, laboratory exercises, and lectures students will learn how sensory systems function to change diverse environmental signals into information that can be interpreted by the brain. Fieldtrips will be used to highlight specific sensory systems and laboratories/lectures will provide the conceptual framework. Together these experiences will lay the foundation for students’ understanding of vision, taste, smell, touch, and hearing in the unique environment of Florence, Italy.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

ECON 42295/52295 ST in Economics: Current Issues in the European Union

Course Name: ECON 42295/52295 ST in Economics: Current Issues in the European Union

Description: This course will examine current economic issues in the European Union, including the exit of the UK, the monetary union and Euro, unemployment, immigration, health care, social security, poverty and inequality,. The historical development and structure of the EU will also be covered and the role of cultural influences will be explored. The course will also include visits to organizations related to the issues at hand.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

ENG 38895 ST: Beginning Again in Italy: Women’s Journeys and Our Own

Course Name: ENG 38895 ST: Beginning Again in Italy: Women’s Journeys and Our Own

Course Description: As Rachel Cusk says in her memoir The Last Supper, in novels, people are “forever disappearing off to Italy at a moment’s notice, to wait out unpropitious seasons of life in warm and cultured surroundings. It [is] a cure for everything: love, disappointment, stupidity, strange, vaporous maladies of the lungs,” along with “disenchantment . . . claustrophobia . . . boredom . . . and a hunger that seem[s] to gnaw at the very ligaments of [one’s] soul.” You are probably familiar with some of the journeys depicted in the literature Cusk references, not to mention the many romances portrayed in popular culture in which American and English women find love and/or themselves while on holiday in Italy. In this class, we will examine, primarily, personal accounts of English-speaking women who have moved to Italy in order to reset their lives, focusing on ways being a woman affected both their desire to begin again and their subsequent experiences, and we will write close renderings of things we, ourselves (whatever our gender), observe and experience in Florence—material we will draw on to write, at the end of the month, personal narratives in which we begin to ask ourselves how our experiences of living in Italy have (or have not) changed us. We will visit, among other sites, Casa Guidi, the home of poets Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Robert Browning—who had moved from London to Florence, fleeing her father’s disapproval, in 1846, during the period Italy struggled to free itself from Austrian domination—and the English Cemetery, where she is buried.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 21011 or HONR 10297

ENG 39595 Environmental Humanities: Environmental Change and Italy (Special Topics in Literary Criticism)

Course Name: ENG 39595 Environmental Humanities: Environmental Change and Italy (Special Topics in Literary Criticism)

Course Description: How can we live better? This class explores a range of related questions centered on environment, nature, and the climate crisis. The class will first offer a planetary perspective on recent environmental changes, then turn for most of the course to specific themes in Italy. The course is designed as “environmental humanities,” meaning we will explore history, literature, film, and other cultural practices, aiming to offer accounts of the past that make the environmental present legible. We will use field trips in Florence to exciting places to bring our analyses to life, including Boboli Gardens (to consider architecture and planning), the Uffizi Gallery (to consider environment and art), and Museo Galileo (to study the rise of science). We will also study Venice to investigate the challenge of rising seas and the Venetian solution of the MOSE sea gates. The class will end with a visit to one of Florence’s many excellent slow food restaurants (such as Trattoria Mario), offering an example of cultural practices of the kind needed to respond to the climate crisis. The areas of focus, thus, are Environmental History, Planning with or against Nature, Venice Against the Sea, Reading Art Environmentally, and Slow Food.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 21011 or HONR 10297.

ENG 41292 TEFL Practicum

Course Name: ENG 41292 TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) Practicum

Description: Through the TEFL practicum, students will get hands-on experience teaching learners of English as a foreign language. Students will observe and assist local teachers in Florence as well as plan and teach their own classes. Students will gain experience teaching learners in a variety of contexts and age groups, from children to adults.   

Prerequisites: ENG 31007

Credit Hours: 3-6 

FDM 35589 Italian Fashion and Culture

Course Name: FDM 35589 Italian Fashion and Culture

Description: Evolution of the fashion industry in post World War II Italy. Study of the creators, design and production processes creating one of the most successful unions of commercial product and cultural expression world-wide.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: FDM 35900

Only pre-approved Fashion students may register for this course

FDM 45589 Field Experience European Fashion Study Tour for Florence Students (ELR)

Course Name: FDM 45589 Field Experience European Fashion Study Tour for Florence Students (ELR)

Description: (Repeatable for credit)Visit to European fashion markets including design and fabric houses or showrooms, retail stores, buying offices and other areas of the fashion industry.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Fashion design or fashion merchandising major.

Only pre-approved Fashion students may register for this course

FIN 36040 Personal Financial Planning

Course Name: FIN 36040 Personal Financial Planning

Course Description: Welcome to Personal Financial Planning! This course provides a comprehensive and practical overview of financial terms, concepts, and techniques that are useful and necessary in handling day-to-day real-life situations. Students will learn how to: Use Time Value of Money skills to deal with typical business and personal situations (e.g. financing a house, auto purchase v. lease, investment decisions, retirement planning, etc.), Develop personal financial statements and sound money management practices, Learn the types of consumer credit and their advantages / disadvantages, Identify risks and appropriate use of home, auto, health, disability, and life insurance, Understand investing basics especially for stocks and bonds. Course does not fulfill a requirement for the Finance major or minor. Students cannot earn credit toward graduation for both FIN 36040 and FIN 36063.

Note: This course is offered through the Trumbull Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the regional campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Minimum 2.000 overall GPA; and junior standing

FIN 36053 Business Finance (June Session)

Course Name: FIN 36053 Business Finance 

Course Description: Welcome to Business Finance! This is an introductory finance course analyzing the basic financial decisions of corporations and the interface of the firm with capital markets. Students discuss stocks, bonds, the time value of money, risk versus return and the essentials of capital budgeting. Students will: understand the goal of a corporation and explain how agency conflicts impact this goal, apply the principles of the time value of money to various streams of cash flows, conduct security (bond/stock) valuation and explore what determines security value, measure firm risk and its impact on the cost of capital, use various methods for evaluating firm projects and identify their relative strengths in capital budgeting.

Note: This course is offered through the Trumbull Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the regional campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: ACCT 23020 or ACTT 11000; and ECON 22060 or HONR 21197; and ECON 22061; and minimum 2.000 overall GPA.

HDFS 42092 Love, Marriage, and Family: Florence

Course Name:  HDFS 42092 Love, Marriage, and Family: Florence 

Course Description: The course explores the concepts of love, marriage, and family of Florence and Tuscany using the city as our classroom. In this course, we’ll explore how historical family honor, rituals, culture, and social context continue to influence the modern Florentine family. Students will engage in naturalistic observation of modern Florentine couples and families and explore historic family honor and power through art and fashion. We’ll work to identify family rituals and traditions passed down from the Roman empire at Roman ruins and explore how modern policies and culture influence love, relationships, and family. In short, we want to understand what makes the modern Florentine family and understand how those families function.

Note: This course is offered through the Stark Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the Stark Campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

HDFS 42092 Millennials and Gen Z: Life in Italy

Course Name:  HDFS 42092 Millennials and Gen Z: Life in Italy

Course Description: Explore and experience what growing up in Italy is like through the lens of culture, policy and practice. Most class periods will be spent visiting and observing historical sites, schools, non-profit agencies, and everyday life while considering the influence of education, religion, and state policy on childhood and adolescent outcomes. Students will have the opportunity to actively engage with Florentines in a brief in-country volunteer experience.

Note: This course is offered through the Stark Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the Stark Campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None 

HIST 38495 Modern Italy: Religion, Gender, Empire, Race

Course Name: HIST 38495 Modern Italy: Religion, Gender, Empire, Race

Course Description: This course examines major themes in the history of Italy since the Risorgimento. In spite of the centuries of history to be found in Italy, the country itself is only 160 years old. We will explore the many transformations and challenges that modern Italy has faced, and how historians have utilized issues of race, gender, empire and religion in particular to understand those challenges. The question of national identity was massively important to the leaders of the Italian unification; were all Italians “equally” Italian in their eyes? Did the state open up opportunities for women and workers in the public sphere? Did the dream of a “greater Italy”, first devised in the liberal era, lead to Mussolini’s imperial designs on Libya and Ethiopia? How did Italy’s experience of World War One and “defeat in victory” drive Italy into a fascist alliance and World War Two? How did culture and gender shape international perceptions of Italy’s fashionable 1960s modernity? How have European integration, mass migration, generational rebellion and feminism transformed conceptions of Italian identity since then?

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

MUS 20295/MUS 40295 ST: Vocal Performance Practice and Techniques in Florence, Italy (June Session)

Course Name: MUS 20295/MUS 40295 ST: Vocal Performance Practice and Techniques in Florence, Italy

Course Description: A comprehensive study of the history of vocal performance, technique and repertoire for students interested in having a thorough knowledge of Italian vocal music and how it has evolved throughout history.

Note: This course is offered through the Stark Campus. Students who enroll in this course will pay the Regional Campus tuition rate per credit hour.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

MUS 22111 Understanding Music (June Session)

Course Name:  MUS 22111 Understanding Music (KFA)

Description:  The course will survey the history of Western music using Florence as the backdrop. It will connect music with the history of Florence allowing students to gain an understanding of music through live concerts, visits to museums and by studying the numerous links between Florence’s art, architecture and music. Students will have the opportunity to attend concerts from a variety of periods including a full-length opera. A class period will be spent at the Instrument Museum that displays Cristofori’s first piano (you will also see the David in the same museum!). The course will incorporate the free opera that all students attend into the curriculum. Other free listening opportunities include Gregorian chant at San Miniato, a full mass sung in Latin, with the participation of the Maggio musicale Fiorentino, in occasion of San Giovanni, saint protector of Florence. More options will be available as summer schedule materialize. An optional event will be attending a full length opera in the courtyard of Palazzo Pitti. It is about $24 if we go as a group. By the end of the course students will: 1) Become aware of how music has affected the lives of people throughout the centuries 2) Become aware of music in a variety of different styles 3) Understand the connections between Music Art and Architecture

Note: This course is offered through the Stark Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the Stark Campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

 

Credit Hours: 3

 

Prerequisites: None

POL 40995 Give us your Tired and your Poor: The Politics of Immigration Policy in a Comparative Context

Course Name: POL 40995 Give us your Tired and your Poor: The Politics of Immigration Policy in a Comparative Context

Course Description: Far too often, political rhetoric, fear, and hyperbole dominate the conversation when it comes to immigration policy and reform. By understanding the history of immigration and how it interconnects with economics, culture, religion, and race, students will develop a broader perspective in assessing the immigration policy debate (both domestically and globally). The course also seeks is to provide students a better conception of the interconnectedness of immigration policy to other policy domains including economic policy (both foreign and domestic), welfare policy, education policy and criminal justice policy. The course will explore how conceptions of race, religion and culture are central instruments in this process. This includes an examination of social perceptions of immigrants (both historically and today) as these perceptions are key in shaping public opinion toward immigrants. Students will visit local museums where they will be able to see historic artifacts that illustrate the role religion, race and culture play in shaping values and definitions of who is included and excluded in society. Finally, we will study immigration policy approaches used by Italy, the EU and the USA in a comparative context to gain a better understanding of how context shapes policy.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

SOC 42095 ST Racial Reckoning: US and Italy in the era of Floyd

Course Name: SOC 42095 ST Racial Reckoning: US and Italy in the era of Floyd

Course Description: Spurred by the recent killings of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor in the U.S. and those of Idy Diene and Soumalia Sacko in Italy, activists and scholars have intensified their focus on the devaluation of Black lives and how this presents in both nations. This comparative course examines the development, spread, and manifestation of anti-Black racism in Italy and the U.S. The course will focus on three areas of inquiry: the origins, ideologies, and resistance to anti-Black racism. First, we explore the origins of anti-Black racism in the U.S. (with a focus on the Transatlantic Slave Trade, chattel slavery and de jure segregation) and Italy (with a focus on its colonial relationships with Somalia, Libya, Eritrea, and Ethiopia). We then examine the ideologies that emerged and sustained anti-Black sentiment and practices in the U.S. (pseudo-science, criminalization) and Italy (xenophobia, anti-immigrant policy). Finally, we focus on resistance efforts that focus on anti-racist activity in the U.S. and Italy. We sample from the social sciences, humanities, arts, and public health to understand both how anti-Black racism manifests and is resisted.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: 

July Session Courses 

AERN 45153 Aviation Safety Theory

Course Name: AERN 45153 Aviation Safety Theory

Description: This course provides an introduction to safety theories, models, and systems. This will include discussion about specific accidents and applications of those theories and models to real life situations.  

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None

AERN 45791 Aviation Security/Policy

Course Name: AERN 45791 Aviation Security/Policy

Description: Examines policies, practices, procedures and regulatory provisions developed to create and enhance security in civil aviation with a special emphasis on airlines, airports, airspace and agencies responsible for civil aviation security. As a writing intensive course, AERN is designe to address emerging paradigms in civil aviation security through a scholastic appraoch that emphasizes descriptive analyses in the study of aviation security policy and practice.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: AERN 45250

CRIM 34311 Youth & the Justice System

Course Name: CRIM 34311 Youth & the Justice System

Course Description: This course explores analysis of situations involving the legal rights of children and youths, which demand intervention by justice institutions or service agencies. Emphasis will be on how contemporary understandings and policies related to children’s rights, specifically the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of the Child of 1989, influence policy, institutions, and practices related to protecting children and promoting their rights. Children’s rights issues in Italy and the broader European context will be of specific interest, and UNICEF’s Innocenti Office of Research in Florence will be consulted. In addition, independent children’s rights organizations (IRCIs) and their work in Italy and Europe to protect children and promote children’s rights will be a topic of inquiry in this class.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

DI 49995 The Enlightenment: How it Changed the Way We See the World

Course Name: DI 49995 The Enlightenment: How it Changed the Way We See the World

Course Description: The Enlightenment changed how we see and understand the world from both a scientific and artistic perspective. This course will begin with an historical review on how, during the renaissance, we began to understand the fundamentals of light. Scientifically, Newton revealed white light was composed of the primary colors and Galileo utilized the newly invented telescope to study the heavens. At the same time, the use of perspective and stunningly accurate depictions of how light and shadow can be conveyed revolutionized the art world. The balance of the course will follow some of the key developments that have affected both the scientific and artistic worlds, again with an emphasis on our understanding of light. It will cover the development of photography and the subsequent impressionist movement in the art world. It will end with a final connection of the arts, science and technology. It will make a direct connection between Serat and pointillism and the liquid crystal displays that dominate our current depictions of the real world. The course will include a team project in which the students will explore “How can we create a new presentation experience that captures the multi-disciplinary nature of the Enlightenment?”. Working in groups of 3-4 students, they will use their smart phones to curate a virtual gallery, video or other shareable resource consisting of photos/videos, etc. they have taken in Florence that illustrate at least one of the primary themes covered in the course, such as those listed above.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

ECON 22061 Principles of Macroeconomics

Course Name: ECON 22061 Principles of Macroeconomics (KSS)

Course Description: This is an introductory Macroeconomics course. Emphasis is given to the application of Macroeconomic principles to current economic issues in the Eurozone and the USA. General topics include policies for controlling inflation and unemployment, economic way of thinking, monetary system, national income theory, and the fundamentals of international macroeconomics. This course will provide an economic analysis of EU processes that includes highlighting tools and instruments of the European Central Bank’s monetary policy, and the history of the Euro. It will further shed light on the coordination of national-level fiscal policies of the European countries via the European Commission.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: ECON 22060

ENGR 35550 Law and Ethics for Engineers

Course Name: ENGR 35550 Law and Ethics for Engineers

Course Description: This course examines legal and ethical issues in engineering design. Special focus will be given to Negligence Law, Strict Product Liability Law, Design and Manufacturing defects, Patent, Copyright and Trademark law. Employment law and whistleblower protection will be discussed in the context of the engineer. Special Focus will be given through the examination of case studies including but not limited to the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, the Space Shuttle Columbia Disaster, and the Boeing 737 Max crashes.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

GEOG 40195/GEOL 40095 ST: Climate Change and Life

Course Name: GEOG 40195/GEOL 40095 ST: Climate Change and Life

Course Description: The interaction between humans and their environment has been central to Geography, and especially in an era of urbanization, demographic changes, and climate change, attention to this interaction has become ever more widespread. Both extreme weather events as well as background climate shifts can have substantive roles on human systems, including health, the economy, and the built environment. In this course, students will explore these connections on a global level, as well as with specific examples in Italy and the Florence region.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

HIST 38595 Race in the Early Modern Mediterranean

Course Name: HIST 38595 Race in the Early Modern Mediterranean 

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to how the social construction of race was formed and understood in different parts of Italy in the early modern period. By combining critical race theory with the intellectual history of the early modern Mediterranean basin, students will trace the history of ideas, literature, religious thought, and art from the fourteenth- to the sixteenth-centuries to analyze how the early modern concept of race served as a precursor for modern concepts of racial identity formation. In terms of geography, the Mediterranean basin is an area of cross-cultural movement linking Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. Additionally, an un-unified Italy composed of diverse cultural and linguistic groups serves as an ideal location to study how concepts of race were complicated, formed, and utilized in early modern Mediterranean life, politics, and culture. Therefore, understanding how diverse groups met and interacted in this space can demonstrate to students how race and identity are framed in multi-cultural environments. Since this course will focus on Italy, primary areas of study will include areas of cross-cultural exchange in: Rome, Florence, Naples, and Sicily. Aside from a primary reader, students will be exposed to a variety of course materials including: written sources both primary and secondary, and art. Since this course will be taught on Kent State’s Florence campus, our class can take advantage of on-sight experiences through the study of visual culture in order to show how racial conceptions were captured in early modern art. Students may analyze both secular and non-secular works in order to observe social constructions of race in early modern Italy; therefore, both museum and church visits would be beneficial for the class.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

LGBT 30095/PACS 35095 ST: Out in the World: LGBTQ Lives, Rights, and Cultures in Italy and Beyond

Course Name: LGBT 30095/PACS 35095 ST: Out in the World: LGBTQ Lives, Rights, and Cultures in Italy and Beyond

Course Description: Gender and sexuality are concepts shaped by the cultures and histories of nations. But with the expansion of international agreements and global understandings, tensions have arisen around the acceptance and inclusion of sexual minorities. This survey class will explore the complex story of how LGBTQ identities and rights have been shaped in different parts of the world, and it will examine how globalism has provided LGBTQ activists with collective symbols and strength. Although the view of the course is international, a lens of interest will be placed on Italy. From the expansion of the Roman Empire to the influence of the Renaissance and the impact of the Catholic Church, Italy provides ample examples of the progress and egress of sexual acceptance and a framework for realizing how politics, art, religion, culture and place can influence human rights. Furthermore, the course will explore how the relatively recent inclusion of LGBTQ rights in Italy (as part of its membership in the European Union) illustrates the expansion of international human rights laws to include sexual identity as a protected category.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

MUS 20295/MUS 40295 ST: Vocal Performance Practice and Techniques in Florence, Italy (July Session)

Course Name: MUS 20295/MUS 40295 ST: Vocal Performance Practice and Techniques in Florence, Italy

Course Description: A comprehensive study of the history of vocal performance, technique and repertoire for students interested in having a thorough knowledge of Italian vocal music and how it has evolved throughout history.

Note: This course is offered through the Stark Campus. Students who enroll in this course will pay the Regional Campus tuition rate per credit hour.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

MUS 22111 Understanding Music (July Session)

Course Name:  MUS 22111 Understanding Music (KFA)

Description:  The course will survey the history of Western music using Florence as the backdrop. It will connect music with the history of Florence allowing students to gain an understanding of music through live concerts, visits to museums and by studying the numerous links between Florence’s art, architecture and music. Students will have the opportunity to attend concerts from a variety of periods including a full-length opera. A class period will be spent at the Instrument Museum that displays Cristofori’s first piano (you will also see the David in the same museum!). The course will incorporate the free opera that all students attend into the curriculum. Other free listening opportunities include Gregorian chant at San Miniato, a full mass sung in Latin, with the participation of the Maggio musicale Fiorentino, in occasion of San Giovanni, saint protector of Florence. More options will be available as summer schedule materialize. An optional event will be attending a full length opera in the courtyard of Palazzo Pitti. It is about $24 if we go as a group. By the end of the course students will: 1) Become aware of how music has affected the lives of people throughout the centuries 2) Become aware of music in a variety of different styles 3) Understand the connections between Music Art and Architecture

Note: This course is offered through the Stark Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the Stark Campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

POL The Global 2020s: Art, Science, and Politics in the Age of Disinformation

Course Name: POL The Global 2020s: Art, Science, and Politics in the Age of Disinformation

Course Description: “The Global 2020s” have the potential to turn out to be a momentous time period for upholding the value of human dignity and reimagine the global agora. Adding to the complexity of 21st century global challenges, we are experiencing a worldwide trend of fifteen years of consecutive democratic decline. Populists and their disinformation and propaganda machines exploit the media ecosystem as they wield a comprehensive attack on the political, legal, social, and media spheres creating an epistemic crisis and, also, an existential crisis for democratic institutions and civil society. We will look at the past and the present and explore how art and various artistic expressions, along with scientists in the natural as well as in the social sciences have been acting as catalysts of change and have the potential to inspire a paradigm shift that is more congenial to the value of human dignity. We will explore how art and various artistic expressions, as well as scientific achievements and interactions of scientists have shaped political, social, and cultural structures locally and transnationally, with special emphasis on comparisons between past and present, i.e., the way in which Renaissance artists and scientists reacted to and shaped the world around them versus the work and influence of modern-day artists and scientists. Not only art, but science and technology in Italy has a long presence, from the Roman era and the Renaissance. We will consider the relationship between aesthetics and politics, conceptions of community and the public, and the practical aims of arts and sciences, both intended and actual. Students will be expected to look at art, analyze and understand scientific contributions and participate in a series of museum visits, learn from guest speakers and will also be assigned special research projects and try to find answers to questions such as the following. What could be the building blocks of a new scientific golden age and rebirth of the arts? What, if anything, could we benefit from the digital age that could contribute to transnational activism in defense of human dignity? What specific designs of communication networks might be useful for aiding the efforts of artists and scientists to achieve such goals? This course has been designed for students from across all disciplines.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: 

PSYC 41495 Emotions, Culture & Health

Course Name: PSYC 41495 Emotions, Culture & Health

Description: Emotions are central in all psychological and many physiological processes. Moreover, emotions are robustly evident in daily life in both culture and in health. In this class, we will investigate the science of emotions and health as well as the broader role that emotions play in society. In particular, we will participate in a century-old yet still pressing debate as to the underlying nature of emotion: biological vs. cultural. We will discuss evolutionary and socio-cultural models of emotion as well as observe emotions elicited and expressed in both art and society. Our primary goal: to attempt to resolve this debate based on evidence accumulated throughout the course.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None