Course Offerings

Florence Summer Institute 2024 Courses 

Course offerings are subject to change and may vary each summer.

The following Summer 2024 courses are open to all students, unless otherwise noted.  Most courses have no prerequisites, but it is important that students check the catalog for course details.  Be sure to meet with your academic advisor to discuss course options and review which courses may be the best fit to fulfill requirements for your degree.

June Session Courses

ANTH 48889/58889 FACES: Human Head Anatomy with a Forensic Art Focus

Course Name: ANTH 48889/58889 FACES:  Human Head Anatomy with a Forensic Art Focus

Description: Our course begins with studying works by Renaissance artist/anatomists to gain an appreciation for how well they understood human anatomy. We also visit La Specola Anatomical Collection (exquisite wax models copied from real corpses during the 17th century). In the classroom students study human skulls and learn the form and function of the muscles of facial expression and mastication. We pay close attention to features of the skull that ultimately give each face its unique qualities and study the areas that indicate age and sex of the individual. Each student will sculpt the facial bones of a skull, using an exact replica cast as a model. Students learn the techniques of two-dimensional forensic facial reconstruction. Using knowledge of head anatomy, and tissue depth data from the literature, each student will prepare detailed sketches (one man, one woman) based on photographs of the skulls. We also learn how to age-progress images of young adults.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None

ARTH 22007 Art History: Renaissance to Modern Art

Course Name: ARTH 22007 Art History: Renaissance to Modern Art

Description:  This course will review a diversity of artists, styles, and ideas from the fourteenth century to the modern period. Beginning in Renaissance Italy and ending in contemporary Australia, this class explores movements in painting, architecture, photography, and more across the continents. This course is also an introduction to the Art History

discipline and considers the successes and pitfalls of building an art historical canon—a canon that has historically focused on Western European art. Students will also focus on the role that women artists and artists of color have played within the field of Art History. With in-class discussions, museum visits, and opportunities to study artworks in

person, students will gain the art historical skills of close looking and critical analysis by the end of this course. This course may be used to satisfy a Kent Core Requirement. Kent Core courses as a whole are intended to broaden intellectual perspectives, foster ethical and humanitarian values, and prepare students for responsible citizenship and productive careers.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

ETEC 47495/67495 Innovative Technologies and their Impact on Italian Wine, Food, Culture, Education and Religion

Course Name: ETEC 47495/67495 Innovative Technologies and their Impact on Italian Wine, Food, Culture, Education and Religion

Description: There is an important relationship between technology, society, and culture. Society and culture often shape our desire for, development of, and use of technology. That same technology then shapes how society and culture grow and change. Recent technological advances (i.e., artificial intelligence, virtual reality) seem to be even more impactful on the speed at which we view, review, and shape our societies and cultures. The main purpose of this course is to examine Florentine and Italian society and culture, specifically focusing on food, wine, education, museums, and religion. Each week we will simultaneously: 1) explore the ways in which we get access to information and learn from innovative technologies (e.g., AR & VR); 2) explore how those tools shape Italian (and global culture); and 3) use that learning to set the stage to become producers of content for global consumption. The class will capitalize on the Italian and KSU context with field trips to learn and capture content for creation of student materials. Additionally, students will explore cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary aspects of technology consumption and production. This course is applicable for anyone interested in the relationships between technology, society, and culture.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None/Graduate Standing.

ENG 41292 TEFL Practicum

Course Name: ENG 41292 TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) Practicum

Description: Through the TEFL practicum, students will get hands-on experience teaching learners of English as a foreign language. Students will observe and assist local teachers in Florence as well as plan and teach their own classes. Students will gain experience teaching learners in a variety of contexts and age groups, from children to adults.   

Prerequisites: ENG 31007

Credit Hours: 3-6 

ENG 38895 ST: Traveling and Writing

Course Name: ENG 38895 ST: Traveling and Writing

Description: Inspired by the environment—the landscape, art, culture, history, etc.—and by writers who have come before us, you may choose to write poetry, fiction, and/or nonfiction. As we try to absorb some portion of all we see and hear, we will employ Virginia Woolf’s practice of street haunting and consider Rainier Maria Rilke’s notion of inseeing. We will share poems or short vignettes, along with brief responses to readings, during classroom meetings, but half our time will be spent exploring. You will choose readings from a range of historical and contemporary poets and writers—from English-speaking travelers and expatriates like Mary and Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mina Loy, D. H. Lawrence, James Wright, Joseph Brodsky, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Rachel Cusk to Italians in translation like Boccaccio, Dante, Gaspara Stampa, Eugenio Montale, Cesar Pavese, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Italo Calvino, and Patrizia Cavalli. Each week we will focus on a set of topics: art, myth, and religion; landscape and the environment; history and politics; social justice and health care. Related site visits will include places like the churches of Santa Trinita and Santa Croce and the Murate Art District; the Cascine Park along the River Arno and the Archaeological Area and Etruscan routes in the hillside town of Fiesole; Casa Guidi (Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning’s home across from the Pitti Palace) and the National Archaeological Museum; the Hospital of the Innocents Museum and the English Cemetery. A longer work or a collection of polished poems or vignettes will be due at the end of the session.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

ENG 34041 Fairy Tales

Course Name: ENG 34041 Fairy Tales

Description: 

In our summer Fairy Tales course we will 1) discuss the definition of fairy tales as opposed to folk tales and other fictional genre; 2) study histories of fairy tales and their influence; 3) apply concepts from top scholars in the field such as Ruth Bottigheimer and Jack Zipes.  

As a part of this process, we will read and respond to, in order of their appearance in print, Italian, French, and German fairy tales to explore which stories were told, what elements each incorporated, and what each culture emphasized. We will also explore English, Irish, and Scottish tales and how they differ from and/or add to the continental tales. From there we will study Disney and other film adaptations in the context of each tale’s history. Finally, we will look at post-modern fantasy fiction in print and film as it brings the world of the tales to life in new contexts.  

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: ENG 21011

CRIM 37095 Born Criminal? The Italian Origins of Criminology & Forensics

Course Name: CRIM 37095 Born Criminal? The Italian Origins of Criminology & Forensics

Description: This course will examine the history and legacy of criminological theory, the foundation of which was developed in Italy across the 1700s and 1800s. In this course, we will explore the work of classical philosophers such as Beccaria and Lombroso, examining how crime is defined, what makes a criminal, and how society should punish people who engage in crime. Then, students will investigate the legacy of these Italian criminological theories in criminology and forensics today. The course will explore how these theories influenced the development of the justice system and forensics across Europe and in the United States, and the implications of this work within the context of social justice. Students will be directed to critically evaluate how the justice system today serves as an institution responsible for protecting society and the “social contract”.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

FDM 35589 ITALIAN FASHION & CULTURE

Course Name: FDM 35589 Italian Fashion & Culture

Description: This class will examine the evolution of the fashion industry in Italy and the long tradition of art, craftsmanship, style and design that led to the success of the post-war era. We will study the history, creators, design and production processes with emphasis on the evolving roles of the fashion centers of Florence, Rome and Milan. The class will also examine the political, economic and industrial factors contributing to the creation of the Italian fashion system.  The lectures are supplemented by site visits and field trips to museums, artisans and factories.

*Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for an additional fee for field trips related to this course.*

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

CLAS 21405 The Roman Achievement

Course Name: CLAS 21405 The Roman Achievement

Description: This course is an introduction to the history and culture of the Roman world, from the origins of Rome through its ascent to domination of the Mediterranean world, the troubled changes from Republic to Empire, and the flourishing of the city and its provinces during the Imperial period until its crisis and consequent fall during the 4th-5th centuries AD. Political and military organizations, religious beliefs towards life and death, social identity, entertainment, private life, familial relationships, sexuality and the changes of these assets and values throughout time are examined in this course by means of the most recent archaeological and historical approaches and debates. As we search together to unravel the historical, cultural and social significance of the Roman achievement, primary sources in translation will be used to provide a fresh look of how some political events were perceived, how Roman urban life and its agents were captured by the satirical descriptions of Juvenal and Martial, and how such a catastrophic event such as the eruption of the Vesuvius affected writers such as Pliny and Seneca.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Kent Core Humanities & Global Diversity 

Open to all students.

CCI 40089: Branding and Social Media Strategies for Italian Lifestyle

Course Name: CCI 40089: Branding and Social Media Strategies for Italian Lifestyle

Description: The course will analyze the phenomenon of ‘made in Italy’ with a focus on fashion, food and design from a communication perspective. Students will have the chance to better understand the branding strategies effectively operating behind some of the most important Italian brands that make Italy and Italian productions fascinating and attracting for the foreign consumers and markets. The course will focus on PR, social media and advertising strategies that are central for contemporary brands and it will investigate the main strategic areas of ‘made in Italy’ and how they are communicated and promoted. Specific case studies will be presented and discussed in class.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students

CCI 40095 From Ideas to Stories: Storytelling in Tuscany

Course Name: CCI 40095 From Ideas to Stories: Storytelling in Tuscany

Description: Ideas are the backbone to all types of content creation: video, still image, writing, advocacy, campaigns, or advertising. Where do ideas come from? How do you turn ideas into pitches, products for clients, or personal projects? Through exploration of the unique resources in and around Florence, Italy, this course will help students develop their ability to generate ideas for media and create action plans to turn those ideas into appealing content. The course uses the city of Florence and its vast large narrative potential for stimulating students’ creativity and storytelling capability pushing them to detect and develop worth-telling stories. Students will explore and learn from experts about different topics that are relevant for the city such as arts, history, food, fashion etc. At the same time, through different projections, they will be exposed to different forms of storytelling they will be able to apply to different media such as video, photography, journalism, advertising, and communication campaigns. Students will enrich their knowledge and competences as content creators and storytellers while experiencing and appreciating a foreign culture.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

*This course has a $300 course fee.

BUS 30234 International Business

Course Name: BUS 30234 International Business

Description: This course provides an introduction to different environments, theories and practices of international business. This course is designed for all students interested in international business, regardless of their principal academic discipline. Topics covered include globalization; international companies; sustainability; the impact and importance of culture; economic, financial, social, political environments; global strategies and structures; international marketing and entry modes. In order to facilitate these goals, students are expected to prepare, present their views, and actively participate in classroom discussions. The course provides a broad survey of the theoretical and practical aspects of management practice in Europe, introducing you the major financial, economic and socio – economic, physical, socio – cultural political, labor, competitive and distributive forces that characterize business in Europe. The course will help you to develop an increased awareness of the differences between European and North American business practices, and a better grasp of the impact of differences in business practices on the conduct of business internationally. The emphasis in this course is both on understanding and applying one’s knowledge of different management practices, using national cultures as an aid to understanding the evolution of various management practices.
We begin by analyzing the international business environment that connects the phenomenon of globalization with the national and cultural differences that characterize the countries in this economy. Next we will analyze, how to first define a strategy to enter foreign markets, select then a global company structure, and define a global marketing and pricing strategies. We will delve into some strategic and functional issues that characterize the management of organizations in the global marketplace.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: ECON 22060 or ECON 22061

Open to all students with prerequisites.

BSCI 30789 Feasts and Plagues: the Science of Italian Food, Wine and Disease

Course Name:  BSCI 30789 Feasts and Plagues: the Science of Italian Food, Wine and Disease

Course Description: This course explores the microbial mechanisms responsible for plagues such as the Black Death as well as for their positive roles in food and wine production. These costs and benefits are explored in Florence, Italy since each is ingrained in the city's history, culture, art, and biology. Course activities include food and wine tastings and field trips to historical sites and museums in Florence and Siena. This course is designed to appeal to students with a wide array of interests in human health and society. Students will analyze genomes of microbes responsible for human disease, discuss ecological and biological factors associated with disease transmission, construct cemetery life tables, discuss the impacts of disease on Italian art, architecture, and culture, master knowledge of the fermentation process, and compare and contrast the microbiomes and environments of vineyards in Tuscany vs. California.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

ARTH 42091/62095 Art Experiences in Italy

Course Name: ARTH 42091/62095 Art Experiences in Italy

Description: You are enjoying the singular opportunity of becoming acquainted with Florence, Italy, one of the most beautiful and celebrated cities in the world, hailed as a birthplace of the modern era in Western civilization.  This course will introduce you to the major artworks and monuments in the city, with the goal of giving you a sense of the progression of styles from the Middle ages through the Renaissance to the Baroque.  You will learn to understand some of the social, political and historical contexts that led to the formation of these styles. We will analyze and discuss the great works and monuments of the Florentine Renaissance directly on the spot in front of the actual works of art, a circumstance few people get to experience, and one which I hope will leave you with a lifetime of impressions and memories to savor.  You will also be exposed to the diverse regional productions of the great cities of Rome and Venice and the Tuscan hill towns.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

ARTH 42045 Italian Art from Giotto to Bernini (June Session)

Course Name: ARTH 42045 Italian Art from Giotto to Bernini 

Description: This course will explore the development of art and architecture in Italy from the late Middle Ages to the Roman Baroque period. Through an in- depth analysis of the art and history of these periods, we shall develop an understanding of Italy’s role in the overall development of Western civilization. Particular emphasis will be given to Florentine Art. Florence exhibits to this day a particularly well-integrated conception of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Taking advantage of this, we will use the city as our classroom in order to examine the development of Florentine art and architecture in context. In addition to “on-site” lectures, classroom lectures will focus on the art produced in other major Italian cities.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

CCI 40289 Italian Cinema

Course Name: CCI 40289 Italian Cinema

Description: The course introduces the student to the world of Italian Cinema. In the first part the class will be analyzing Neorealism, a cinematic phenomenon that deeply influenced the ideological and aesthetic rules of film art. In the second part we will concentrate on the films that mark the decline of Neorealism and the talent of ‘new’ auteurs such as Fellini and Antonioni. The last part of the course will be devoted to the cinema from 1970s to the present in order to pay attention to the latest developments of the Italian industry. The course is a general analysis of post-war cinema and a parallel social history of this period using films as ‘decoded historical evidence’. Together with masterpieces such as Open City the screenings will include films of the Italian directors of  the ‘cinema d’autore’ such as Life is Beautiful and the 2004 candidate for the Oscar for Best Foreign Film, I Am Not Scared. The class will also analyze the different aspects of filmmaking both in Italian and the U.S. industry where I had the pleasure to work for many years in the editing department on films such as Dead Poets Society and The Godfather: Part III. The films in DVD format are dubbed in English or sub-titled.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

GEOG 41800 Global Environmental Issues

Course Name: GEOG 41800 Global Environmental Issues

Description: Explore some of the most difficult environmental and climate challenges the world faces from the vantage point of Florence this summer.  From mitigating the causes of climate and environmental changes, to adapting to precarious water resources, increased natural disasters, and the effects of urban development we will seek to understand the crises at the forefront of current-day Europe.  We’ll explore some of the local initiatives in Florence to deal with these challenges through field visits, guest lectures from  local experts, and role playing exercises.  Take an optional field trip one weekend to Venice to learn from a local scientist how Italy is dealing with the impacts of the rising sea in a sinking city and is working to preserve it for future generations.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

HDFS 45089 Lifespan Development Practices and Outcomes: The Italian Experience

Course Name: HDFS 45089 Lifespan Development Practices and Outcomes: The Italian Experience

Description: The goal of the course is to explore Italian culture, customs, education and governmental influences on human development. Students will do this through lectures, assignments, and naturalistic observations of Florentines. We’ll spend most of our class time visiting historical sites, nonprofit organizations and guided exploration of the city along with lectures from local experts.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: 2.5 cumulative GPA

HDFS 44089 Families in Florence, Italy: Love, Parenting and Policy

Course Name:  HDFS 44089 Families in Florence, Italy: Love, Parenting and Policy (ELR)

Course Description: The course explores the concepts of love, marriage, and family of Florence and Tuscany using the city as our classroom. In this course, we’ll explore how historical family honor, rituals, culture, and social context continue to influence the modern Florentine family. Students will engage in naturalistic observation of modern Florentine couples and families and explore historic family honor and power through art and fashion. We’ll work to identify family rituals and traditions passed down from the Roman empire at Roman ruins and explore how modern policies and culture influence love, relationships, and family. In short, we want to understand what makes the modern Florentine family and understand how those families function.

Note: This course is offered through the Stark Campus.  Students who enroll in this course will pay the Stark Campus tuition rate per credit hour. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

HEM 43231 Food, Wine and Beverage Pairing

Course Name: HM 33031 Food, Wine and Beverage Pairing

Description: This course provides students with knowledge of the sensory relationship of Food, Wine, Beer and Spirits, and the important role this process has on Hospitality Operations. Course topics will include developing an understanding of wine, beer and food pairing as a hierarchical process, Old and New World traditions, and traditional and non-traditional gastronomic pairings. Menu development and cooking play an important role in this class.  Food and Beverage are the two most importance facets of restaurant operations.  Furthermore, the growth and interest in this area has been suggested as a reaction to the “homogenizing influence of globalization” with customers seeking unique eating and drinking experiences. To respond to these trends, hospitality firms as well as hospitality training and education need to move beyond basic practical courses or training focusing solely on business issues to training that reflects the growing interest in unique experiences by the hospitality industry.

*This course has an additional course fee of $300 per student. Students must be 21 years of age or older to enroll

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Special Approval 

HIST 37001 Florence: The Myth of a City

Course Name:  HIST 37001 Florence The Myth of a City

Description: Florence is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance and the cradle of modern Western Civilization because, among the many Italian city-states, it experienced a cultural development that had no precedent in European history. Florentine republicanism is a political paradigm through which we, still today, trace the origins of the values of democracy, freedom, rational thought, individualism, the scientific method and the capacity for critical reflection. This course covers and analyzes different historical eras of Florence from its founding, during the Roman era, up until today. Special attention is given to periods of intensive development in Florence: the re-birth of the Middle Ages, the splendor of the Renaissance, and the crucial role of the Risorgimento, when the city was the capital of the new Kingdom of Italy (1865-1871) and became a center of culture and modern civilization. This course will be offered only in Florence.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing

ITAL 15201 Elementary Italian I

Course Name: ITAL 15201 Elementary Italian I

Description: An introduction to the Italian language in the context of Italian culture.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

LTCA 44033/54033 Long Term Care Administration II with an international flair

Course Name: LTCA 44033 Long Term Care Administration II

Description: Have you considered retiring in Europe, maybe Italy? International LTC is becoming a focus as the world's older adult population grows rapidly. The course will benefit students in any major, as well as majors such as hospitality, gerontology, long term care administration, business, and students interested in senior living. Visits to senior living communities in and around Florence will introduce students to how international long-term care differs from services offered in the US.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Minimum B- in LTCA 44032; and senior standing.

MKTG 45060 International Marketing

Course Name: MKTG 45060  International Marketing

Description: The course provides a comprehensive overview of international marketing issues characterizing international companies in foreign markets. It will introduce students to the international markets and the principles underlying the development and implementation of marketing strategies across and within foreign countries. Topics include: political, cultural, and legal environmental changes as new competitive challenges for companies involved in international businesses, international marketing strategies (domestic market expansion, multi-domestic marketing, and global marketing), multicultural marketing researches, international segmentation and competitive positioning, and international marketing mix in terms of product, distribution, communication and price decisions. During lessons the students are expected to prepare, present their views, and actively participate in classroom. In order to facilitate their participation, lessons include discussions of cases and the viewing of videos on international marketing experiences. The course is designed to stimulate curiosity about international marketing practices of companies, which seek global market opportunities and to raise the student's consciousness about the importance of an international marketing perspective in the international business management.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: MKTG 25010 or BMRT 21050 or MKTG 35035

Open to all students with prerequisites.

MUS 22111 Understanding Western Music (June Session)

Course Name:  MUS 22111 Understanding Western Music (KFA)

Description:  The course will survey the history of Western music using Florence as the backdrop. It will connect music with the history of Florence allowing students to gain an understanding of music through live concerts, visits to museums and by studying the numerous links between Florence’s art, architecture and music. Students will have the opportunity to attend concerts from a variety of periods including a full-length opera. A class period will be spent at the Instrument Museum that displays Cristofori’s first piano (you will also see the David in the same museum!). The course will incorporate the free opera that all students attend into the curriculum. Other free listening opportunities include Gregorian chant at San Miniato, a full mass sung in Latin, with the participation of the Maggio musicale Fiorentino, in occasion of San Giovanni, saint protector of Florence. More options will be available as summer schedule materialize. An optional event will be attending a full length opera in the courtyard of Palazzo Pitti. It is about $24 if we go as a group. By the end of the course students will: 1) Become aware of how music has affected the lives of people throughout the centuries 2) Become aware of music in a variety of different styles 3) Understand the connections between Music Art and Architecture.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

MUS 22121 Music as a World Phenomenon in Florence

Course Name: MUS 22121 Music as a World Phenomenon in Florence

Course Description: Immerse yourself in the life culture and excitement of Florence, Italy through music. Learn about ancient music sitting in a 2000-year-old amphitheater, medieval and renaissance music in the palaces and churches where they were first performed. See a full-length opera at one of the greatest opera houses in the world. Watch a rock band, such as Metallica, at the Florence Rocks Concert. 

This course will explore music as a part of human life to reflect the experiences, desires, and histories of the world’s peoples. What does music mean to the people who produce it, practice it, and consume it?  How are these meanings constructed and experienced and what does music mean to you! 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

POL 40995 The Politics of Climate Change and Climate Action

Course Name: POL 40995 The Politics of Climate Change and Climate Action

Description: In November 2022 UN Secretary General Guterres sent a strong warning about the earth’s future to the international community: “We are on a highway to climate hell with our foot still on the accelerator.” In our course we will discuss to what extent Mr. Guterres statement is indeed reflecting the state of affairs of the current situation and how difficult climate change will make our future life. We will also try to understand why we are so off track in fighting the heating of our planet. Led by international relations theories we will discuss which level of political action - the international, national or local level - is most urgently required to address the effects of climate change. While the climate crisis is a truly global topic, we will have a special focus on Europe when we talk about national and regional climate policies, e.g. by covering Italy’s climate and energy policy and the EU’s Green Deal.

Credit Hours:

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing

PROS 40095 Soft Skills of Leadership: European and American Perspectives

Course Name: PROS 40095 Soft Skills of Leadership: European and American Perspectives

Description: This course will assist students in tapping into their leadership potential by exploring the soft skills of leadership and exploring both European and American perspectives regarding essential leadership characteristics. There will be multiple opportunities for exploration in and around Florence, studying leadership as it is manifested in business, education, the food and wine industry and professional sports.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

SPAD 45024 Sport in Global Perspective

Course Name: SPAD 45024 Sport in Global Perspective

Description:  Students will critically analyze how sport, in contemporary societies, relates to general features of globalization and the connection between global and local issues (including social, cultural, economic, and geopolitical issues). The underlying assumption is that sport is part of a growing network of global interdependencies that bind human beings together. The course will try to fully integrate the students’ abroad experience in their learning process. For this purpose, a focus on the Italian context will be a relevant part of the course through visits (Museo del Calcio di Coverciano – National Football Museum in Florence; Viola Park – ACF Fiorentina training center in Florence), and guest lectures and meetings with professional sport managers from Pistoia Basket – LBA pro team, ACF Fiorentina men and women, Savino del Bene women Volleyball – Italian team, and Guelfi American football Firenze. The role of media system will be emphasized (sport events, such as soccer games, pro basketball games, NCAA varsity sports etc.) for a deep understanding of the media representation and the media coverage of sport in Italian, US and worldwide contexts as well.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Senior Standing

SPED 4/53062 Curriculum Methods Mild/Moderate

Course Name: SPED 4/53062 Curriculum Methods Mild/Moderate

Course Description: The focus of this course is on the delivery and adaptation of evidence-based practices for students with mild/moderate disabilities with an emphasis on achievement in general curriculum. Students in this course learn how to deliver a highly effective lesson to a diverse group of students with a range of academic abilities. Students will have the opportunity to practice evidence-based instructional and behavior management practices. The strategies and practices presented in this class are applicable across grade levels and content areas.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

FDM 45589 Field Experience European Fashion Study Tour for Florence Students (ELR)

Course Name: FDM 45589 Field Experience European Fashion Study Tour for Florence Students (ELR)

Description: (Repeatable for credit)Visit to European fashion markets including design and fabric houses or showrooms, retail stores, buying offices and other areas of the fashion industry.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Fashion design or fashion merchandising major.

Only pre-approved Fashion students may register for this course

July Session Courses

AERN 45135 Aviation Safety Theory

Course Name: AERN 45135 Aviation Safety Theory

Description: This course provides an introduction to safety theories, models, and systems. This will include discussion about specific accidents and applications of those theories and models to real life situations.  

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None

AERN 45250 Aviation Law

Course Name: AERN 45250 Aviation Law

Description: Involves a study of the origins of Western jurisprudence, common law and aviation law as an integral part of law in the U.S. Also introduces international aviation law bilateral agreement as well as U.S. Constitutional law and its amendments as they relate to the structure and process of aviation law. Criminal and civil law as they relate to civil aviation are also addressed. Case studies are included. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None

AERN 45791 Aviation Security/Policy

Course Name: AERN 45791 Aviation Security/Policy

Description: Examines policies, practices, procedures and regulatory provisions developed to create and enhance security in civil aviation with a special emphasis on airlines, airports, airspace and agencies responsible for civil aviation security. As a writing intensive course, AERN is designed to address emerging paradigms in civil aviation security through a scholastic approach that emphasizes descriptive analyses in the study of aviation security policy and practice.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: AERN 45250

ARTH 42045 Italian Art from Giotto to Bernini (July Session)

Course Name: ARTH 42045 Italian Art from Giotto to Bernini

Description: This course will explore the development of art and architecture in Italy from the late Middle Ages to the Roman Baroque period. Through an in- depth analysis of the art and history of these periods, we shall develop an understanding of Italy’s role in the overall development of Western civilization. Particular emphasis will be given to Florentine Art. Florence exhibits to this day a particularly well-integrated conception of painting, sculpture, and architecture. Taking advantage of this, we will use the city as our classroom in order to examine the development of Florentine art and architecture in context. In addition to “on-site” lectures, classroom lectures will focus on the art produced in other major Italian cities.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

ARTS 45089 International Experience: Studio Art

Course Name: ARTS 45089  International Experience: Studio Art

Description: Through a daily sketchbook practice in Florence students will observe and record their environment through drawing from observation at locations such as: gardens, museums, churches, the scenic landscapes, and the city views of Florence. By sketching, taking visual field notes (such as rubbings of textures), and using photography, students will create studio-based work that builds upon and distills their direct observations. Through this process students will develop a series of self-directed works-on-paper that translate those impressions into finished artworks. Depending on the student’s sensibility and interest, completed work will range from pictorial to abstract, as well completed works maybe conceptually driven. Students will create a portfolio of artworks reflective of their experience living in Florence, using techniques and strategies that range from drawing and wet-media painting to image transfer, various low tech printmaking techniques, and collage. This studio-based class will be influenced by and will complement the numerous museum and historic site visits which are part of the Florence Summer Institute experience. The daily sketchbook practice will act as a travel-log/diary documenting students’ trips in the region, for example to Siena and the other destinations. Students will be introduced to artists, illustrators and scientists that utilize the sketchbook and fieldnotes as way of seeing and understanding their environment.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

BSCI 30789 Feasts and Plagues: The Science of Italian Food, Wine and Disease (July Session)

Course Name: BSCI 30789 Feasts and Plagues: The Science of Italian Food, Wine and Disease

Description: This course explores the microbial mechanisms responsible for plagues such as the Black Death as well as for their positive roles in food and wine production. These costs and benefits are explored in Florence, Italy since each is ingrained in the city's history, culture, art, and biology. Course activities include food and wine tastings and field trips to historical sites and museums in Florence and Siena. This course is designed to appeal to students with a wide array of interests in human health and society. Students will analyze genomes of microbes responsible for human disease, discuss ecological and biological factors associated with disease transmission, construct cemetery life tables, discuss the impacts of disease on Italian art, architecture, and culture, master knowledge of the fermentation process, and compare and contrast the microbiomes and environments of vineyards in Tuscany vs. California.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

BSCI 40195 Mythical Creatures and Developmental Biology

Course Name: BSCI 40195 Mythical Creatures and Developmental Biology

Description: Since ancient times and in many different cultures, mythical creatures such as monsters (e.g. the hydra, gargoyles), human and animal hybrids (e.g. centaurs, the Sphinx), and creatures with a combination of traits (e.g. unicorns, dragons) are symbols of human values and feelings including power, loyalty, wisdom, fear, and sadness. Mythical creatures are represented in writing, art, and sculpture throughout the city of Florence, Italy. In this course we will explore and view mythical creatures through a developmental biology prism in order to assess what is possible due to architectural constraints of animal forms vs. what is fantastical, made possible only in man’s deepest imaginations. This course will include site visits to art museums and sculpture gardens to view mythical creatures, discussion of what these creatures symbolize in Italian (or French) cultural history, site visits to natural history museums to record animal architectural constraints in a historical context, and discussion of developmental biological processes that underlie these architectural constraints. This course is designed for biology majors and non-majors.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

BUS 30234 International Business (July Session)

Course Name: BUS 30234 International Business

Description: This course provides an introduction to different environments, theories and practices of international business. This course is designed for all students interested in international business, regardless of their principal academic discipline. Topics covered include globalization; international companies; sustainability; the impact and importance of culture; economic, financial, social, political environments; global strategies and structures; international marketing and entry modes. In order to facilitate these goals, students are expected to prepare, present their views, and actively participate in classroom discussions. The course provides a broad survey of the theoretical and practical aspects of management practice in Europe, introducing you the major financial, economic and socio – economic, physical, socio – cultural political, labor, competitive and distributive forces that characterize business in Europe. The course will help you to develop an increased awareness of the differences between European and North American business practices, and a better grasp of the impact of differences in business practices on the conduct of business internationally. The emphasis in this course is both on understanding and applying one’s knowledge of different management practices, using national cultures as an aid to understanding the evolution of various management practices.
We begin by analyzing the international business environment that connects the phenomenon of globalization with the national and cultural differences that characterize the countries in this economy. Next we will analyze, how to first define a strategy to enter foreign markets, select then a global company structure, and define a global marketing and pricing strategies. We will delve into some strategic and functional issues that characterize the management of organizations in the global marketplace.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: ECON 22060 or ECON 22061

Open to all students with prerequisites.

CCI 40095 Italian Cinema (July Session)

Course Name: CCI 40095 Italian Cinema

Description: The course introduces the student to the world of Italian Cinema. In the first part the class will be analyzing Neorealism, a cinematic phenomenon that deeply influenced the ideological and aesthetic rules of film art. In the second part we will concentrate on the films that mark the decline of Neorealism and the talent of ‘new’ auteurs such as Fellini and Antonioni. The last part of the course will be devoted to the cinema from 1970s to the present in order to pay attention to the latest developments of the Italian industry. The course is a general analysis of post-war cinema and a parallel social history of this period using films as ‘decoded historical evidence’. Together with masterpieces such as Open City the screenings will include films of the Italian directors of  the ‘cinema d’autore’ such as Life is Beautiful and the 2004 candidate for the Oscar for Best Foreign Film, I Am Not Scared. The class will also analyze the different aspects of filmmaking both in Italian and the U.S. industry where I had the pleasure to work for many years in the editing department on films such as Dead Poets Society and The Godfather: Part III. The films in DVD format are dubbed in English or sub-titled.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

CLAS 21405 The Roman Achievement

Course Name: CLAS 21405 The Roman Achievement

Description: This course is an introduction to the history and culture of the Roman world, from the origins of Rome through its ascent to domination of the Mediterranean world, the troubled changes from Republic to Empire, and the flourishing of the city and its provinces during the Imperial period until its crisis and consequent fall during the 4th-5th centuries AD. Political and military organizations, religious beliefs towards life and death, social identity, entertainment, private life, familial relationships, sexuality and the changes of these assets and values throughout time are examined in this course by means of the most recent archaeological and historical approaches and debates. As we search together to unravel the historical, cultural and social significance of the Roman achievement, primary sources in translation will be used to provide a fresh look of how some political events were perceived, how Roman urban life and its agents were captured by the satirical descriptions of Juvenal and Martial, and how such a catastrophic event such as the eruption of the Vesuvius affected writers such as Pliny and Seneca.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Kent Core Humanities & Global Diversity 

Open to all students.

COMM 35852 Intercultural Communication (July Session)

Course Name: COMM 35852 Intercultural Communication

Description: In the contemporary world characterized by globalization of goods, people and ideas, and by growing processes of internal diversification, intercultural competences are necessary requirements for every individual both for personal and professional life. Intercultural Communication deals with the relevance of difference (not only among cultures but also within a culture) that is approached both as a threat and as a resource. In our everyday experience the continuous reference to the ‘other’ (ethical, religious, political, gendered etc) is used to build up the very sense of our identities and in so doing dividing the world among ‘us’ and ‘them’, ‘bad’ and ‘good’, ‘friends’ and ‘enemies’. Diversity compels us to reflect upon our values, and the taken-for-grantedness of the social world in which we live. This course will move from the social constructivist approach trying to combine together sociology, cultural anthropology, and media studies investigating the role that diversity plays in our every-day life and the importance to acquire an intercultural communication approach in order to be more effective in our processes of communication, to solve conflicts and to better understand the interactions among individuals, institutions and cultures. Theories, concepts and problems will be presented through lectures and audiovisual materials. Interaction is strongly required and will be stimulated. Students will be invited to take part in the classes commenting on the topics presented, offering opinions, surveying and practicing ‘problem solving’.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

ECON 22061 Principles of Macroeconomics

Course Name: ECON 22061 Principles of Macroeconomics 

Description: Principles and policies affecting aggregate production, consumption, investment and government expenditures. Includes role of money, the banking system, inflation, unemployment and economic growth.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

GEOG 31080 Geography of Wine

Course Name:  GEOG 31080 Geography of Wine

Description: Learn about the physical environment of viticulture, including climate, soil and farm practices; the cultural tradition of wine making, consumption and trade; and regional production styles of Tuscany.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

HIST 37001 Florence The Myth of a City (July Session)

Course Name:  HIST 37001 Florence The Myth of a City

Description: Florence is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance and the cradle of modern Western Civilization because, among the many Italian city-states, it experienced a cultural development that had no precedent in European history. Florentine republicanism is a political paradigm through which we, still today, trace the origins of the values of democracy, freedom, rational thought, individualism, the scientific method and the capacity for critical reflection. This course covers and analyzes different historical eras of Florence from its founding, during the Roman era, up until today. Special attention is given to periods of intensive development in Florence: the re-birth of the Middle Ages, the splendor of the Renaissance, and the crucial role of the Risorgimento, when the city was the capital of the new Kingdom of Italy (1865-1871) and became a center of culture and modern civilization. This course will be offered only in Florence.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing

HIST 38595 Memory, Imagination, and Power: History Through Documentary Filmmaking

Course Name: HIST 38595 Memory, Imagination, and Power: History Through Documentary Filmmaking

Description: This course will explore, analyze, and debate European, Italian, and Florentine history through the lens of documentary films. From historical documentaries on ancient Rome to the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, to films addressing critical contemporary issues of migration, climate change, human rights, war, and more this course explores how documentary films interpret history, make history and in some cases, have even changed history. Students are invited to ask deep questions about the very nature of storytelling in the context of making history: Do documentaries tell the truth? Can we rely on them as sources of history? Who or what shapes the narrative of history for people, ideas, and even nations? What is the role of media and technology (especially artificial intelligence) today in shaping storytelling for history? How does the delivery platform (streaming services, theatrical distribution, YouTube, etc.) alter critical and audience reception and ultimately the cultural impact of every film? Each week, students will watch several documentaries in order to compare and analyze the different perspectives on story telling technique and presentation of historical “facts.” In addition, students will visit significant historical sites in Florence that are featured in the documentary films themselves in order to develop their own sense both of history and of narrative. At the end of the course, students will pitch story ideas for documentaries that engage with public history in Florence and extend the lessons of the past into the future.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  Sophomore Standing

HIST 38595 Race and Diversity in the Mediterranean World

Course Name: HIST 38595 Race and Diversity in the Mediterranean World

Description: 

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to how the social construction of race was formed and understood in the early modern period. By combining critical race theory with the intellectual history of the early modern Mediterranean basin, students will trace the history of ideas, literature. religious thought, and art from the fourteenth- to sixteenth centuries in order to analyze how the early modern concept of race served as a precursor for modern concepts of racial identity formation. 

In terms of geography, the Mediterranean basin is an area of cross-cultural movement linking Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. Therefore, understanding how diverse groups met and interacted in this space can demonstrate to students how race and identity are framed in multi-cultural environments. Since this course will focus on the Mediterranean, primary areas of study will include areas of cross-cultural exchange primarily: Spain, Portugal, Italy, Sicily, and parts of France and North America.

Aside from a primary reader, students will be exposed to a variety of course materials including written sources both primary and secondary, and art. Since this course will be taught on Kent States Florence campus, out class can take advantage of on-sight experiences through the study of visual culture in order to show how racial conceptions were captured in early modern art. Students may analyze both secular and non-secular works in order to observe social construction of race in early modern Italy: therefore, both museum and church visits would be beneficial for the class.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing

ITAL 15201 Elementary Italian I (July Session)

Course Name: ITAL 15201 Elementary Italian I

Description: An introduction to the Italian language in the context of Italian culture.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

ITAL 35597 Colloquium: Recent Italian Literature in Translation

Course Name: ITAL 35597 Colloquium: Recent Italian Literature in Translation

Description: This course will focus on the close reading and analysis of selected authors of the modern Italian literary tradition, moving from Camilo Boito's Senso (1882) to Marissa Madieri's Verde acqua (1987).  The goal is to examine attempts by Italian authors to exlpre the self through literature.  Alongside the struggle to gain self-consciousness, we will also trace the shifts in techniques used by these authors as we move from the nineteenth to the twentieth century.  To help us understand such changes, our class will explore mediums, such as art and cinema, including visits to museums in Florence.  We will also consider the diverse geographic and regionla linguistic contexts out of whcih these novels emerged, with attention to the place and role of women and gendered roles in these works.  Students will read Camilo Boiti's Senso (1883), Carlo Collodi's The Adventures of Pinocchio (1883), Italo Svevo's La coscienza di Zeno (1923), Luigi Pirandello's So It Is (If You Think So) (1917), One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand (1925), Anna Banti's Artemisia (1947), Italo Calvino's The Cloven Viscount (1951) and Cosmicomics (1965), and Marisa Madieri's Acqua Green (1987).  For most texts, selections are chose to allow for close analysis of the text, although studnets will select a complete work as the basis for the final written assignment.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

MGMT 34165 Dynamics of Leadership

Course Name: MGMT 34165 Dynamics of Leadership

Description: This course discusses management and leadership concepts and does so by blending theory and practice. The courses uses case studies, practical application approaches, personal assessment and provides opportunities for students to develop individual and group leadership skills. In addition, many organizational behavior concepts are blended throughout the course.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: MGMT 24163 or BMRT 11009.

MKTG 45060 International Marketing (July Session)

Course Name: MKTG 45060 International Marketing

Description: The course provides a comprehensive overview of international marketing issues characterizing international companies in foreign markets. It will introduce students to the international markets and the principles underlying the development and implementation of marketing strategies across and within foreign countries. Topics include: political, cultural, and legal environmental changes as new competitive challenges for companies involved in international businesses, international marketing strategies (domestic market expansion, multi-domestic marketing, and global marketing), multicultural marketing researches, international segmentation and competitive positioning, and international marketing mix in terms of product, distribution, communication and price decisions. During lessons the students are expected to prepare, present their views, and actively participate in classroom. In order to facilitate their participation, lessons include discussions of cases and the viewing of videos on international marketing experiences. The course is designed to stimulate curiosity about international marketing practices of companies, which seek global market opportunities and to raise the student's consciousness about the importance of an international marketing perspective in the international business management.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: MKTG 25010 or BMRT 21050 or MKTG 35035

Open to all students with prerequisites.

MUS 22111 Understanding Western Music (July Session)

Course Name:  MUS 22111 Understanding Western Music (KFA)

Description:  The course will survey the history of Western music using Florence as the backdrop. It will connect music with the history of Florence allowing students to gain an understanding of music through live concerts, visits to museums and by studying the numerous links between Florence’s art, architecture and music. Students will have the opportunity to attend concerts from a variety of periods including a full-length opera. A class period will be spent at the Instrument Museum that displays Cristofori’s first piano (you will also see the David in the same museum!). The course will incorporate the free opera that all students attend into the curriculum. Other free listening opportunities include Gregorian chant at San Miniato, a full mass sung in Latin, with the participation of the Maggio musicale Fiorentino, in occasion of San Giovanni, saint protector of Florence. More options will be available as summer schedule materialize. An optional event will be attending a full length opera in the courtyard of Palazzo Pitti. It is about $24 if we go as a group. By the end of the course students will: 1) Become aware of how music has affected the lives of people throughout the centuries 2) Become aware of music in a variety of different styles 3) Understand the connections between Music Art and Architecture.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

POL 40589 Human Trafficking, Political Corruption, and the Mafia

Course Name: POL 40589 Human Trafficking, Political Corruption, and the Mafia

Description: Every year, tens of thousands of African migrants attempt to cross the Mediterranean in search of a better life in Europe. Along the way, they are exploited by human trafficking rings who charge them large sums of money only to pack them into boats that, in many cases, are not seaworthy. Because of this, more than 20,000 of these migrants have drowned at sea since 2014. In 2023 alone, more than 2,500 perished attempting to make that dangerous journey.

As a result, Italy expends enormous amounts of money and resources each year conducting rescue operations in the Mediterranean. For those migrants who do make the crossing alive, most land in Italy with little more than the clothes on their backs. This has resulted in a refugee crisis of historical proportions. This course examines the nexus between the socio-economic conditions that drive refugees to migrate, and the corrupt politicians and criminal organizations that profit from the crisis. Consideration will also be given to the ways in which the crisis has contributed to the rise of populist authoritarian leaders and the erosion of democratic norms and institutions in Europe. Finally, comparisons will be made with the ongoing migrant crisis in the United States, and its impact on our own democracy.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

PH 40195/HPM 60195 Mental Health in Florence: A Public Health Approach

Course Name: PH 40195/HPM 60195 Mental Health in Florence: A Public Health Approach

Description: Public Mental Health in Florence will provide a broad overview of mental health from a public health perspective. The course will broadly cover the nature of mental health disorders, methods and assessment relevant to public mental health, descriptive epidemiology, mechanisms of risk, the behavioral healthcare system and prevention. The course will utilize the public mental health approach in learning about and developing interventions meant to improve the mental health and wellness of the population of Florence.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None/Graduate Standing

PSYC 41495 Emotions, Culture & Health

Course Name: PSYC 41495 Emotions, Culture & Health

Description: Emotions are central in all psychological and many physiological processes. Moreover, emotions are robustly evident in daily life in both culture and in health. In this class, we will investigate the science of emotions and health as well as the broader role that emotions play in society. In particular, we will participate in a century-old yet still pressing debate as to the underlying nature of emotion: biological vs. cultural. We will discuss evolutionary and socio-cultural models of emotion as well as observe emotions elicited and expressed in both art and society. Our primary goal: to attempt to resolve this debate based on evidence accumulated throughout the course.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

SPA 44089/EPSY5/70093 Cognition of Conversation, Miscommunication, and Learning

Course Name: SPA 44089/EPSY5/70093 Cognition of Conversation, Miscommunication, and Learning

Description: Communication is the seat of social interaction, and to truly understand the intricacies of communication - we will communicate. Therefore, this course will not be like a traditional lecture-based course but will include three types of immersive learning contexts: field exploration, rich in-class discussions, and online preparatory lectures about communicating. There will be three planned field exploration activities, in which we will learn about pragmatics as we people watch at famous locations in Florence, like Ponte Vecchio, discover the city as we use language to navigate maps, and practice our perspective taking skills in local shops or restaurants. In-class discussion will come from discussions of personal experience and review of assigned readings, while online preparatory assignments will include pre-recorded lecture content and knowledge checks. These activities will allow us to engage in rich dialogue about topics related to cognition, communication, miscommunication, and learning — with the hope to improve personal and cultural communication practices.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None/Graduate standing and special approval/Doctoral standing and special approval.

SPAD 25000 Sport in Society

Course Name: SPAD 25000 Sport in Society 

Description: The aim of the course is to study and to apply different theoretical perspectives to the reflection and comprehension on sport in different countries, with reference to the United States and Italy.

Students will critically analyze how sport relates to the social relations and cultural values of United States and Italian societies, using a comparative and cross-cultural approach. The course is framed by a critical evaluative perspective, examining how social class, ethnicity, race and gender relations shape sport practices.

Analysis of specific case studies both from US and Italy will stimulate an active in-class students’ participation. The course will try to fully integrate the students’ abroad experience in their learning process. For this purpose, a focus on the Italian context will be a relevant part of the course through visits (Museo del Calcio di Coverciano – National Football Museum in Florence), and guest lectures and meetings with athletes and representatives from Pistoia Basket – LBA pro team, ACF Fiorentina women, Savino del Bene women Volleyball Scandicci-Firenze team, Beep Firenze Baseball for Blind team, and Volpi Rosse wheelchair basketball Firenze team.

The role of media system will be emphasized for a deep understanding of the media representation of sport in Italy and US.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing.