Course offerings are subject to change and may vary each summer.  The following summer 2019 classes are open to all students.  Most classes have no prerequisites, but check the catalog or talk with an advisor for details.  Be sure  to meet with your academic advisor to discuss which courses are best fit with the requirements for your major. 


Aeronautics & engineering

AERN Airport Management

Course Name: AERN 35340 Airport Management

Course Description: This course provides an Introduction to the many functions that are involved in the operation and management of an airport. Includes an analysis of the development of the airport- airway system, airport legislation, airport planning and airport operations.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: AERN 15740 or 15745; and 25250 

AERN 45153 Aviation Safety Theory

Course Name: AERN 45153 Aviation Safety Theory

Description: This course provides an introduction to safety theories, models, and systems. This will include discussion about specific accidents and applications of those theories and models to real life situations.  

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None


Arts

ARTH 42095 The Golden Age of Italian Art

Course Name: ARTH 42095 The Golden Age of Italian Art

Description: This course investigates the extraordinary art of Italy from Giotto to Bernini – from early Tuscan Renaissance to the Roman Baroque, with emphasis on examining painting, sculpture, architecture, and urban design within cultural and historical contexts.  Will include guided trips to see many artworks and monuments throughout Florence to view them in their original intended locations.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None


Business & Marketing

BUS 30187 International Business Experience: Switzerland

Course Name: BUS 30187 International Business Experience: Switzerland

Description: The course provides students an opportunity to learn about international business firsthand by meeting officials/managers from select United Nations agencies, non-government organizations and commercial enterprises.   It will introduce students to how nations cooperate to develop rules and policies to guide and govern world commerce.  To do so, a number of topics are discussed including: making markets accessible, promoting fair competition, protecting intellectual property rights, ensuring worker welfare, and managing for-profit enterprises across multiple national borders.  Special attention will be given to the application of these principles in developing and emerging markets.  The course is built around a “live case” where students will be required to apply concepts learned in class to solve a business/policy problem facing a multinational enterprise/UN agency program.

Note:  Class meetings are arranged in Florence (during the June session) to discuss assigned readings and begin case work.  Field visits and presentation of case recommendations are schedule to be held in Geneva, Switzerland (mandatory) during the week following the end of the Florence Summer Institute.  Transportation to/in Geneva and student housing are prearranged.  Additional fees (estimated $1,000) are assessed when enrolling in this course. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: ECON 22060 – Principles of Microeconomics

BUS 30234 International Business

Course Name: BUS 30234 International Business

Description: This course provides an introduction to different environments, theories and practices of international business. This course is designed for all students interested in international business, regardless of their principal academic discipline. Topics covered include globalization; international companies; sustainability; the impact and importance of culture; economic, financial, social, political environments; global strategies and structures; international marketing and entry modes. In order to facilitate these goals, students are expected to prepare, present their views, and actively participate in classroom discussions. The course provides a broad survey of the theoretical and practical aspects of management practice in Europe, introducing you the major financial, economic and socio – economic, physical, socio – cultural political, labor, competitive and distributive forces that characterize business in Europe. The course will help you to develop an increased awareness of the differences between European and North American business practices, and a better grasp of the impact of differences in business practices on the conduct of business internationally. The emphasis in this course is both on understanding and applying one’s knowledge of different management practices, using national cultures as an aid to understanding the evolution of various management practices.
We begin by analyzing the international business environment that connects the phenomenon of globalization with the national and cultural differences that characterize the countries in this economy. Next we will analyze, how to first define a strategy to enter foreign markets, select then a global company structure, and define a global marketing and pricing strategies. We will delve into some strategic and functional issues that characterize the management of organizations in the global marketplace.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Micro and Macro Economics

Open to all students with prerequisites.

MKTG 45060 International Marketing

Course Name: MKTG 45060  International Marketing

Description: The course provides a comprehensive overview of international marketing issues characterizing international companies in foreign markets. It will introduce students to the international markets and the principles underlying the development and implementation of marketing strategies across and within foreign countries. Topics include: political, cultural, and legal environmental changes as new competitive challenges for companies involved in international businesses, international marketing strategies (domestic market expansion, multi-domestic marketing, and global marketing), multicultural marketing researches, international segmentation and competitive positioning, and international marketing mix in terms of product, distribution, communication and price decisions. During lessons the students are expected to prepare, present their views, and actively participate in classroom. In order to facilitate their participation, lessons include discussions of cases and the viewing of videos on international marketing experiences. The course is designed to stimulate curiosity about international marketing practices of companies, which seek global market opportunities and to raise the student's consciousness about the importance of an international marketing perspective in the international business management.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: Principles of Marketing or Fundamentals of Marketing Technology or Consumer Behavior

Open to all students with prerequisites.


Communications

COMM 35852 Intercultural Communication

Course Name: COMM 35852 Intercultural Communication

Description: In the contemporary world characterized by globalization of goods, people and ideas, and by growing processes of internal diversification, intercultural competences are necessary requirements for every individual both for personal and professional life. Intercultural Communication deals with the relevance of difference (not only among cultures but also within a culture) that is approached both as a threat and as a resource. In our everyday experience the continuous reference to the ‘other’ (ethical, religious, political, gendered etc) is used to build up the very sense of our identities and in so doing dividing the world among ‘us’ and ‘them’, ‘bad’ and ‘good’, ‘friends’ and ‘enemies’. Diversity compels us to reflect upon our values, and the taken-for-grantedness of the social world in which we live. This course will move from the social constructivist approach trying to combine together sociology, cultural anthropology, and media studies investigating the role that diversity plays in our every-day life and the importance to acquire an intercultural communication approach in order to be more effective in our processes of communication, to solve conflicts and to better understand the interactions among individuals, institutions and cultures. Theories, concepts and problems will be presented through lectures and audiovisual materials. Interaction is strongly required and will be stimulated. Students will be invited to take part in the classes commenting on the topics presented, offering opinions, surveying and practicing ‘problem solving’.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

COMM 45091 The Genius of Florence

Course Name: COMM 45091 The Genius of Florence

Description: Students spend a semester in Florence, but they spend so much time traveling that it’s not unusual for them to finish the semester with little understanding of Florence itself or what defines the city and its people. This course is designed to give students a brief introduction to the genius and uniqueness of Florence. Course meetings will take place mostly at relevant locations, such as churches, streets, and museums, rather than in the classroom, as the purpose of the course is to begin to familiarize the students with the city and to train their eyes to notice and comprehend what is around them. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

CCI 40095 Italian Cinema

Course Name: CCI 40095 Italian Cinema

Description: The course introduces the student to the world of Italian Cinema. In the first part the class will be analyzing Neorealism, a cinematic phenomenon that deeply influenced the ideological and aesthetic rules of film art. In the second part we will concentrate on the films that mark the decline of Neorealism and the talent of ‘new’ auteurs such as Fellini and Antonioni. The last part of the course will be devoted to the cinema from 1970s to the present in order to pay attention to the latest developments of the Italian industry. The course is a general analysis of post-war cinema and a parallel social history of this period using films as ‘decoded historical evidence’. Together with masterpieces such as Open City the screenings will include films of the Italian directors of  the ‘cinema d’autore’ such as Life is Beautiful and the 2004 candidate for the Oscar for Best Foreign Film, I Am Not Scared. The class will also analyze the different aspects of filmmaking both in Italian and the U.S. industry where I had the pleasure to work for many years in the editing department on films such as Dead Poets Society and The Godfather: Part III. The films in DVD format are dubbed in English or sub-titled.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.


English

ENG 41292 TEFL Practicum

Course Name: ENG 41292 TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) Practicum

Description: The practicum exposes students to hands-on training through classroom observations, assisting, and teaching their own classes in various contexts in Florence, Italy. Students will observe and assist teachers at preschool, elementary school, middle school, high school, and/or university. At times, it is possible to customize students' practicum schedule to meet their educational goals (e.g., gaining experience teaching young children).  

Credit Hours: 


Fashion

FDM 35901 Italian Fashion and Culture

Course Name: FDM 35901 Italian Fashion and Culture

Description: We will examine the evolution of the fashion industry in Italy and the long tradition of art, craftsmanship, style and design that led to the success of the post-war era. Study of the history, creators, design and production processes with emphasis on the role of Florence and Florentine designers. The class will conclude with a consideration of contemporary issues in the Italian fashion industry. The lectures are supplemented by site visits and field trips to museums, artisans and factories.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  

FDM 45592 Italian Study Tour

Course Name: FDM 45592 Italian Study Tour

Description: The course aims to explore and develop a critical awareness on fashion trends in Italy. It focuses on the major centers of Italian fashion business showing and analyzing where the trends are displayed, who are the trendsetters, and how the trends are spread eventually becoming a reality. On-site visits to major Italian fashion centers are a vital component of the course. Places to be explored include: design and fashion houses, small and medium fashion firms, showrooms, fashion archives, ateliers, workshops, private and public museums and collections, art galleries, retail stores, buying offices, and other areas of the fashion industry and Italian art and culture. Visits to art exhibitions will provide a broad idea of the social changes occurring and how artists reflects or anticipate these trends that will then influence fashion. In class introductory lectures give students the tools to face on site visits with a critical approach, follow up meetings based on critical discussions, debates, oral and written reports, presentations allow to share the knowledge. Through seminars professional guest speakers will deepen specific topics of interest.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  


HDFS: human development and family studies

HDFS Cultural Diversity

Course Name:  HDFS Cultural Diversity 

Course Description: TBD 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: TBD 

HDFS 41095 Trauma, Crisis and Resiliency: A Global Perspective

Course Name:  HDFS 41095 Trauma, Crisis and Resiliency: A Global Perspective

Course Description: This seminar serves as an introduction to trauma and crisis and how it looks different across cultures. It includes content concerning: neurobiological and psychosocial development impacted by trauma and crisis; history of trauma and crisis; the nature of trauma (sexual abuse, combat, and natural disasters); and how trauma affects individuals, families, and systems.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None; open to all students. 

HDFS 42092 Love, Marriage, and Family: Florence

Course Name:  HDFS 42092 Love, Marriage, and Family: Florence 

Course Description: This course contains a BUILT-IN SCHOLARSHIP! Because the course is offered through the Stark campus, you’ll pay Stark campus tuition (about 50% of Kent campus tuition), saving you about $500.

The course explores the concepts of love, marriage, and family of Florence and Tuscany using the city as our classroom. In this course, we’ll explore how historical family honor, rituals, culture, and social context continue to influence the modern Florentine family. Students will engage in naturalistic observation of modern Florentine couples and families and explore historic family honor and power through art and fashion. We’ll work to identify family rituals and traditions passed down from the Roman empire at Roman ruins and explore how modern policies and culture influence love, relationships, and family. In short, we want to understand what makes the modern Florentine family and understand how those families function.

This course may serve as an upper-division elective for you, be sure to ask your advisor

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: TBD 

HDFS 42092 Child Development and Welfare Policy

Course Name:  HDFS 42092 Child Development and Welfare Policy

Course Description:This course contains a BUILT-IN SCHOLARSHIP! Because the course is offered through the Stark campus, you’ll pay Stark campus tuition (about 50% of Kent campus tuition), saving you about $500.

This course will explore child development theories through the lens of Italian culture, policy and practice. Most class periods will be spent visiting and observing historical sites, schools, non-profit agencies, museums, and everyday life while learning about the influence of religion, education, SES and state policy on childhood outcomes. Students will have the opportunity to actively engage with Florentines in a brief in-country volunteer experience. 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: TBD 


History

HIST 38195 Italian Mafia

Course Name: HIST 38195 Italian Mafia

Description: This course analyzes the infamous criminal organizations of Italy from their origins to their evolution as an intrinsic part of Italian, and global, history. The relationship between Mafia and politics, its internal rules and codes, its business activities, and its deep connection to the society and the culture of Sicily and the Italian South are some of the important aspects that are examined in depth. Through current literature and media the international reach of the Italian Mafia and its effect on the collective imagination will be examined. The relationship and differences between the Italian and the American Mafia will also be an important component of the course.  In the historical introduction, the origins of the Sicilian Mafia will be explained in the context of the Italian Unification, as well as the development of the Mafia from its agrarian origins to its infiltration into the political realm of the Italian State. The rebirth and transformation of the Mafia after its suppression during World War II is an important historical turning point, one which ultimately led to the institutionalization of the fight against the Mafia, which will also be analyzed from both a political and cultural perspective. Contemporary Mafia activity and its expansion by Italian Mafia organizations, such as the Calabrian ‘Ndrangheta and the Neapolitan Camorra, will be studied after the presentation of the Mafia’s history.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

CLAS 21405 The Roman Achievement

Course Name:  CLAS 21405 The Roman Achievement

Description: This course is an introduction to the history and culture of the Roman world, from the origins of Rome through its ascent to domination of the Mediterranean world, the troubled changes from Republic to Empire, and the flourishing of the city and its provinces during the Imperial period until its crisis and consequent fall during the 4th-5th centuries AD. Political and military organizations, religious beliefs towards life and death, social identity, entertainment, private life, familial relationships, sexuality and the changes of these assets and values throughout time are examined in this course by means of the most recent archaeological and historical approaches and debates. As we search together to unravel the historical, cultural and social significance of the Roman achievement, primary sources in translation will be used to provide a fresh look of how some political events were perceived, how Roman urban life and its agents were captured by the satirical descriptions of Juvenal and Martial,  and how such a catastrophic event such as the eruption of the Vesuvius affected writers such as Pliny and Seneca.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

Kent Core

Open to all students.

HIST 49195/59195/79195 The Florentine Renaissance

Course Name: HIST 49195/59195/79195 The Florentine Renaissance

Description: The aim of this course is to study key thinkers of the Renaissance. They encompass neoplatonic philosophers such as Pico; political theorists, such as Machiavelli; religious reformers such as Savonarola; tracts about language and rhetoric by Valla; Columbus' letters from the "New World" he discovered; poets such as Ariosto, who, in the aftermath of the Fall of Constantinople and the expulsion of the Jews from Spain, wrote plays about the immanent crisis of the values and achievements of their culture. The weave of intellectual history, engagement with texts, and exposure to the wonders of Rome, Florence, and Ferrara will show the Florentine Renaissance as the time of a genuine revolution in the ways of thinking about oneself, politics, and the deepest questions of life.
 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None

POL/HIST 38195 War and Peace: Italy's Historical Role in NATO and EU Security

Course Name:  POL/HIST 38195 War and Peace: Italy's Historical Role in NATO and EU Security 

Course Description:

2019 is the 70th anniversary of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) which was formed originally as an Alliance between the United States, Canada, and ten European states to create a collective defense against the Soviet Union in 1949. Italy was one of the original members of NATO. The Alliance has endured the end of the Soviet Union and in the 1990s NATO expanded to include many former Eastern bloc nations. NATO also took its first non-UN authorized military intervention in the former Yugoslavia during this period. Since the 2000s, NATO has expanded to a current 29 members, and military activities brought NATO forces to Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya. This course will examine the history of NATO as it relates to Italy, the Cold War, the relations between NATO and the European Union, and Italy’s contribution to collective security. Special attention will be given to Italy’s key role in NATO’s southern strategy towards Mediterranean security and Italy’s response to the Mediterranean migration flows from sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere. Guest lecturers will include Italian and other European experts on NATO and EU security issues and politics. This course will be beneficial to students interested in international and DC-based internships, along with students interested in future employment in governmental and non-governmental agencies.

Associate Professor Timothy Scarnecchia is the Director of Kent State University’s Center for NATO and EU Studies. He is a specialist in African history. He is currently interested in NATO and Italian military strategies around Italian and EU border security and activities in Africa.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: TBD 


Italian

ITAL 15201 Elementary Italian I

Course Name: ITAL 15201 Elementary Italian I

Description: An introduction to the Italian language in the context of Italian culture.

Credit Hours: 4

Prerequisites: None

Open to all students.

ITAL Intermediate Italian II

Course Name:  ITAL Intermediate Italian II

Course Description: TBD 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: TBD 


Sciences

ANTH 38095 FACES: Human Head Anatomy with a Forensic Art Focus

Course Name: ANTH 38095 FACES:  Human Head Anatomy with a Forensic Art Focus

Description: The course begins by studying the art and architecture of Pollaiuolo, Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Bandinelli, and others in Florence.  In the classroom, students will study read human skills, and learn the form and function of the muscles of facial expression.  In the last part of the course, students will learn the techniques of two-dimensional forensic facial reconstruction.  Using knowledge of head anatomy, and tissue depth data from the literature, each students will prepare detailed facial approximation sketches, based on skull photographs.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None

BSCI Beauty and the Brain: Exploring Florence Through the Senses

Course Name:  BSCI Beauty and the Brain: Exploring Florence Through the Senses

Course Description: TBD 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: TBD 

BSCI Feasts and Plagues: the Science of Italian Food, Wine and Disease

Course Name:  BSCI Feasts and Plagues: the Science of Italian Food, Wine and Disease

Course Description: TBD 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: TBD 

PHY Seven Ideas that Shook the World

Course Name:  PHY Seven Ideas that Shook the World

Course Description: TBD 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: TBD 


Social Sciences

CRIM From the Magna Carta to the Beheading of Kings: The Origins of Modern

Course Name: CRIM From the Magna Carta to the Beheading of Kings: The Origins of Modern Criminology

Description: In this class we explore what crime “is”: a crime against society or a punishment for individuals' misbehavior. From the readings of Aristotle and Socrates, to the debate between Locke and Hobbes, the polemics of these philosophers leads us to the modern thoughts on criminology, that is, the classical and positivist schools. We will explore the impact of the Magna Carta on human rights, that culminated in the beheading of Charles I in 1649 by the parliamentary forces of Oliver Cromwell’s men for the kings high treason against England. Emerging from Charles I’s execution, the classical school of Bentham and Beccaria engages in a polemic discussion against the positivist school of Garofolo, Lombroso, Ferri, &  Goring. We will also explore the Sociological Aspect of crime developed by Tarde, Durkheim, and Bonger as well as the psychiatric aspects of crime developed by Aschaffenburg, Ray, and Maudsley.

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites: None

PSYC Emotions, Culture & Health

Course Name: PSYC Emotions, Culture & Health

Description: In this class, we will investigate the science of emotions and health as well as the broader role that emotions play in society. In particular, we will participate in a century-old debate as to the underlying nature of emotion: biological vs. cultural.  We will investigate the evidence outside of the classroom by observing people in the world as well as representations of emotion in culture, visiting museums and well-known tourist destinations. Our primary goal: to resolve this debate based on evidence accumulated throughout the course during readings, in-class discussion, and outside class observation.

 

Credit Hours: 3

Prerequisites:  None


University College

UC Career Construction

Course Name:  UC Career Construction

Course Description: Students will increase self-awareness and learn how dreams and emotions can play a broader role in becoming occupational realities. Through experiential activities, cultural filtering/discussion, self-authoring and reflective exercises, students will gain better self-understanding and identify personal and cultural self-concepts. These connections will help them link to academic opportunities/careers and narrow down specializations in career fields in order to select a major or evaluate possible career changes.

Credit Hours: 1.0

Prerequisites: None