Newsletter, March 2018 | Division of Research & Sponsored Programs | Kent State University

Newsletter, March 2018

Volume 2, Issue 1

Liquid Crystal Researcher Secures Patents for Cutting-Edge Tissue Regeneration Models

LCI Professor Elda Hegmann works in the lab with a student

Fundamentally, liquid crystals are all about chemistry … just like the human body. A trio of new patents secured by a Kent State University researcher shows how a novel application of this ever-evolving technology may soon yield answers to some of the world’s most pressing medical dilemmas.

 

Chemistry Lab Conducts Research for FiveThirtyEight.com Investigation into MLB baseballs

A Kent State pitcher hurls a ball toward the plate

Researchers in Soumitra Basu’s chemistry lab cut open the balls to examine the cores using a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).
Read the full story at FiveThirtyEight.com.

 

Photo Caption:
A Kent State University baseball pitcher hurls a ball toward the plate.

Media Contacts:
Dan Pompili, dpompili@kent.edu, 330-672-0731
Emily Vincent, evincen2@kent.edu, 330-672-8595

NSF Grant to Study Organic Transistors Also May Help Students to Better Understand Physics

Bjorn Lussem holds on of the many organic transistors he studies in his lab

While wearable technology is all the rage among high school and college-aged Americans, the average student may not know much about the science behind their high-tech apparel.

A grant from the National Science Foundation will help a Kent State physics professor make progress on both fronts.

Kent State Study Challenges Conventional Wisdom About Cambodian Genocide

An irrigation canal runs through a Cambodian rice field

A recent publication by Kent State geographers sheds more light on the causes of the Cambodian genocide that wiped out roughly a quarter of the country’s population in the late 1970s.

Doctoral Student Publishes Solo Article on Pottery in Top Archaeology Journal

Doctoral Student Michelle Bebber works at the Eren Lab's pottery wheel

Research always begins with a question.
In Metin Eren’s archaeology lab at Kent State University, that question seems to be “why did they make it that way?” and the answers often seem to defy conventional wisdom.