Department of Biological Sciences

Dave Costello, Ph.D., (left), assistant professor in Kent State University’s Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences, and Devan Mathie (right), an undergraduate honors student, stand in Wahoo Ditch in Ravenna, Ohio. The work of 153 ecological researchers from 40 countries, including Kent State University Assistant Professor Dave Costello, Ph.D., from the Department of Biological Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences, has revealed new findings on the effect of climatic factors on river-based ecosystems. The findings are published in the latest issue of...

Students perform environmental research in Kent State natural areas Kent State University has a broad range of faculty, resources, and opportunities that come together to make it a leader in environmental science and water resources. The Center for Ecology and Natural Resources Sustainability (CENRS) was established in 2011 to showcase the strength of environmental sciences at Kent State, establish collaborative...

Grassland in Magersfontein (near Kimberley, South Africa), 1900 Ecosystems in today's world are responding to a wide variety of environmental changes. What happens when these changes interact? That was the topic of a recent paper published by David Ward, Ph.D., the Art and Margaret Herrick Endowed Professor of Plant Biology in Kent State University's Department of Biological Sciences, and international...

Grassland in Magersfontein (near Kimberley, South Africa), 1900 Ecosystems in today's world are responding to a wide variety of environmental changes. What happens when these changes interact? That was the topic of a recent paper published by Dr. David Ward and international colleagues and graduate students in the journal Scientific Reports. Although climate change is often viewed as the overriding global...

John D. Johnson, Ph.D., associate professor of biological sciences at Kent State University, received a three-year, $450,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health. People who suffer trauma will, with few exceptions, never forget what happened to them, but a Kent State University researcher may be able to offer them the hope of living without constant fear and anxiety. John D. Johnson, Ph.D., associate professor of biological sciences in Kent State’s College of Arts and...

Heather Caldwell, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences at Kent State University, was awarded a $450,000 grant to study how oxytocin affects the development of the female and male brain. Heather Caldwell, Ph.D., a professor in Kent State University’s Department of Biological Sciences, recently received a $450,000 grant to study the role that oxytocin plays in the developing brain. Labeled by some as “the bonding hormone,” oxytocin is well known for helping pregnant mothers with uterine contraction while in labor, milk...

Kent State celebrates the grand opening of the new Integrated Sciences Building. Famed science fiction writer and biochemistry professor Isaac Asimov once said, “The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the only one that heralds new discoveries, is not ‘Eureka!’ but rather, ‘Hmm ... that’s funny.’” Members of Kent State University’s scientific community gathered to celebrate the grand opening of its new,...

Kent State University will celebrate the grand opening of the new Integrated Sciences Building on Sept. 15 at 2:30 p.m. Famed science fiction writer and biochemistry professor Isaac Asimov once said, “The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the only one that heralds new discoveries, is not ‘Eureka!’ but rather, ‘Hmm ... that’s funny.’” As members of Kent State University’s scientific community gather to celebrate the grand opening of its new,...

Gemma Casadesus Smith, an associate professor in Kent State’s Department of Biological Sciences, has been awarded a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health. */ /*-->*/ Research shows that women are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than men by a 3-to-2 margin. Some scientists believe this is because when women reach menopause, their bodies cease to produce estrogen, and the pituitary gland begins over-producing another hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), to try to...

baby holding study There is nothing like it - holding a tiny baby in your arms. As a parent, you most likely know what it is like to get flooded with a rush of those ooey-gooey feelings. But why? How does it happen and what is the science behind those feelings for dads? Business Insider reached out to Heather Caldwell, associate professor and graduate coordinator...