Liquid Crystal Institute | 1550664132 | Kent State University

Liquid Crystal Institute

Dr. Peter Palffy-Muhoray, professor of chemical physics and member of the Liquid Crystal Institute, in the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University will present "Rotating nametags, rubber lasers and coin magic: short stories from the world of liquid crystals" for the Applied Mechanics Colloquia at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University on April 4 at 4:00 pm. Liquid crystals open the door to unexpected and intriguing physical phenomena. Dr.

Liquid Crystals Professor Robin Selinger helps develop new material that propels itself forward under the influence of light.

Professor Robin Selinger of Kent State’s Liquid Crystal Institute® helps develop new material that propels itself forward under the influence of light.

Several Kent State University professors in the College of Arts and Sciences have been selected to receive Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF). REU grants are designed to provide faculty with funding to create research positions and experiences specifically for undergraduate students. These students typically come from two- or four-year institutions that may not provide access to many research opportunities.

Scientists at Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands and Kent State University in Ohio have developed a new material that can undulate and therefore propel itself forward under the influence of light. To achieve this, the scientists clamp a strip of this polymer material in a rectangular frame. When illuminated, it goes for a walk all on its own. This small device, the size of a paperclip, is the world’s first machine to convert light directly into walking, simply using one fixed light source.

Scientists at Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands and Kent State University in Ohio have developed a new material that can undulate and therefore propel itself forward under the influence of light. To achieve this, the scientists clamp a strip of this polymer material in a rectangular frame. When illuminated, it goes for a walk all on its own. This small device, the size of a paperclip, is the world’s first machine to convert light directly into walking, simply using one fixed light source.

One of the top publishing societies in the world names a Kent State professor a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Robin Selinger, Ph.D., faculty member at the Liquid Crystal Institute in the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University, has been elected a 2016 Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). Each year, only one half of one percent of APS members are elected as Fellows. Selinger was recognized for fundamental contributions in theory/simulation of materials, focusing on liquid crystals, polymers and lipid membranes. She also was recognized for her exceptional commitment to outreach activities.

The Glenn H. Brown Liquid Crystal Institute® in the College of Arts and Sciences at Kent State University will host the 26th International Liquid Crystal Conference on the Kent Campus from July 31-Aug. 5. The event is open to the public, but paid registration is required.

A group of researchers in Kent State University's College of Arts and Sciences have published a breakthrough article on new properties of liquid crystals in the May 27 issue of Physical Review Letters. The article, which describes some recent surprising results involving nematic liquid crystals induced by a high magnetic field, is currently featured on the American Physical Society website as an “Editors’ Suggestion.”

Pages