Tickets Available Monday, Sept. 26 for Featured Speaker Max Brooks

Limited Number of Tickets Still Available

From “Night of the Living Dead” to “World War Z” and “The Walking Dead,” frightening, flesh-eating zombies have captured the imaginations of horror fans everywhere for more than four decades. Today, they’re more popular than ever, whether on TV, film, or this year’s easy Halloween costume.

Max Brooks, first up at Kent State University at Stark’s Featured Speakers Series, has taken the zombie apocalypse to a whole other level, giving it parallels to what’s happening in today’s society. The best-selling author of such zombie-themed books as “World War Z,” which was made into a major motion picture, “The Zombie Survival Guide” and “The Zombie Survival Guide: Recorded Attacks” speaks Monday, October 17, at 7:30 p.m. at Kent State Stark’s Conference Center in Great Timken Hall.

“From WWI to WWZ: Learning from Our Mistakes,” is the theme of the talk by Brooks, who is widely credited with helping to propel zombie lore from niche sub-culture fascination to mainstream pop culture obsession.   

Besides being a prolific writer, the 44-year-old son of comedian, actor and director Mel Brooks and late Oscar-winning actress Anne Bancroft, Brooks has also been a prominent voiceover and TV actor. In his writing, he uses fictional metaphor and historical events to prompt serious discourse on large-scale problem-solving and explores new ways to attack old problems and new concerns. His unconventional thinking has inspired the U.S. military to examine how they may respond to potential crises.

On stage, as with his writing, Brooks tackles the tougher questions, like what are the threads that hold society together, and what’s really at stake when those threads are stressed, loosened or torn.  

Brooks’ appearance marks the opening of the Featured Speakers Series 26th year. For the previous 25 years, this popular Kent State Stark series has been attracting thousands of campus and community members who take advantage of a rare opportunity to be introduced to national and international experts on a wide range of topics and issues that shape our society. 

All Featured Speakers Series programs are free and open to the public. A limited number of tickets remain; tickets are required and seating is limited. A limit of two tickets per person are available. 

Learn more about the Featured Speakers Series


Contact:
Kelly Simonis
Special Events Coordinator
Office of External Affairs
330-244-3223
ksimonis@kent.edu

Danny Trejo to speak on March 9, 2023
Danny Trejo to speak on March 9, 2023
Wednesday, February 01, 2023

UPDATE 2/3/23: EVENT FULL, NO TICKETS REMAIN

 
The Kent State University at Stark Featured Speakers Series and Stark Library's The Dr. Audrey Lavin Speaking of Books Author Series is proud to partner together to bring you An Evening with Danny Trejo.

Danny Trejo has developed a prolific career in the entertainment industry with a hard-earned and atypical road to success. From years of imprisonment to helping troubled youth battle drug addictions, from acting to producing, and now on to restaurant ventures, Trejo’s name, face, and achievements are well recognized around the world.

An Evening with Danny Trejo
Thursday, March 9, 2023 
7 p.m. - Doors open at 6:15 p.m.
Canton Palace Theatre

Update 2/3/23: EVENT FULL, NO TICKETS REMAIN

EVENT FULL - JOIN WAITLIST 
Tickets for Trejo’s presentation are free and open to the public, but registration is required. No in-person tickets will be distributed.


Kent State University at Stark Dean Denise A. Seachrist and Mary Ellen Icaza, CEO and executive director of the Stark Library, said they are proud to partner together to bring this iconic Hollywood star to the region.  

“We are thrilled to partner with Kent State University at Stark for this event,” said Icaza. “Our organizations are aligned in our missions and philosophies, and Danny Trejo’s life journey is sure to inspire!”  

Seachrist agreed, adding that Trejo’s voice brings a timeless message of hope and opportunity to the local community — and beyond. As part of Trejo’s day in the region, he will host private Q&A sessions with incarcerated individuals at the Trumbull Correctional Institution, who are working toward a college degree at Kent State Trumbull. Trejo will also speak with youth in the Multi-County Juvenile Attention System.  

“Danny Trejo’s story is about second chances. As Stark County’s public university, our mission is to provide the lifechanging education that transforms lives,” Seachrist said. “We know the Stark Library also supports education throughout our local communities. With our missions aligned, it makes perfect sense our speaker series would partner in this way.” 

Recently celebrating 30 years, Kent State Stark’s Featured Speakers Series has brought national and international experts in civil rights, politics, education, environmental activism, literature and art to Stark County. The library’s Speaking of Books Author Series brings acclaimed writers to the county who inspire lively discussion and — at times — challenging conversation while exemplifying literary excellence. 

Trejo, author of the fearlessly honest memoir “Trejo: My Life of Crime, Redemption, and Hollywood”, has starred in dozens of films, television shows and voiced various video games. Some of his notable films include “Desperado”, “Heat”, the “From Dusk ‘til Dawn” series, “Con Air”, “Once Upon a Time in Mexico”, the “Spy Kids” movies “Machete” and more. He has had recurring roles on popular and award-winning television shows, including “Breaking Bad”, “The Flash” and “Sons of Anarchy” — and that’s just to name a few from Trejo’s storied career. 

Most recently, Trejo can be seen in the role of Rancor Keeper in “The Book of Boba Fett” airing on Disney+. Trejo has lent his voice to Cartoon Network’s “Victor and Valentino”, Disney Channel’s “Big City Greens” and Universal Pictures’ “Minions 2: The Rise of Gru”. 

A restaurateur, Trejo recently expanded his Trejo’s Tacos empire to include eight locations and shares his love of food with the world in the release of his first cookbook “Trejo’s Tacos: Recipes and Stories from L.A.” 

Despite Trejo’s impressive list of credits, it is his continuous role as a devoted father of three and an intervention counselor that bring him the most satisfaction. 


For press inquiries, please contact:  

Learn more about Kent State Stark’s Featured Speakers Series.

Learn more about Stark Library’s Dr. Audrey Lavin Speaking of Books Author Series

 

2022 Scholastic Art Exhibition
2022 Scholastic Art Exhibition
Monday, January 16, 2023

Kent State University at Stark is host to the 2023 Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Exhibit and Awards Ceremony.

2023 Scholastic Art Exhibition
Jan. 17 - Feb. 1, 2023
Fine Arts Building

Kent State Stark is closed Jan. 16.

The exhibition features artwork from middle and high school students, representing districts in Stark, Summit, Portage, Wayne, Tuscarawas and Medina counties.

Kent State Stark is impressed by the talent of the students who submitted their artwork. Stop by to view an impressive exhibition of Gold and Silver key winners.

EXHIBIT HOURS:

Monday - Thursday: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Closed Saturday & Sunday
Exhibit will close on Feb. 1 at 1 p.m.

EXHIBIT LOCATION:

Kent State Stark Fine Arts Building
- The William J. and Pearl F. Lemmon Visiting Artist Gallery
- MJ and Pat Albacete Student Art Gallery
 

Learn more about the Scholastic Art Awards & Exhibition at Kent State Stark.

Happy Holidays from Kent State Stark
Happy Holidays from Kent State Stark
Wednesday, December 14, 2022

Happy Holidays from Kent State University at Stark!

The campus will be closed for winter break Friday, Dec. 23, 2022, through Monday, Jan. 2, 2023. 

Buildings and offices will reopen on Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2023, during regular business hours.

Everyone at Kent State Stark wishes you a joyous and healthy holiday season.

Giving Tuesday Kent State Stark
Giving Tuesday benefits fund and students, like Ottie Hosler
Monday, October 31, 2022

When her husband lost his battle with COVID-19, Ottie Hosler sought help from the Emergency Relief Fund. Now, she’s continuing her education with plans to become a registered nurse.

GIVE TO THE EMERGENCY RELIEF FUND

When her younger sisters fell down, Ottie Hosler was there to mend skinned knees and offer a helping hand. From an early age, she knew she wanted to care for people, but more than that, she wanted to be the calming force during an emergency. She wanted to know what to do — how, why and when.  

At 16, she helped save her baby sister. Hosler recalls the pivotal moment when the toddler ran through a camp fire’s hot coals. At a state park in a remote area of Tennessee, help wasn’t nearby and the family, who was gathered for a reunion, panicked.

“I remember it vividly,” Hosler explained. “Everyone was screaming. No one knew what to do. And that was the scariest thing to me — not knowing how to take care of someone or what to do in a situation like that. It’s one of the big reasons why I wanted to become a nurse.”

Her sister was burned so badly she was admitted to a Shriners Hospital for burn care.

While the little girl healed, Hosler would learn that sometimes the answers aren’t always textbook.

“You can do everything right, and still lose someone you love, someone you’ve fought for,” she said. “There’s a right time to push, and a right time to let go.”

Planning for a future, together

Hosler didn’t attend college right away. When she graduated from high school, she was still finding her way.

“I didn’t go to college as soon as I finished high school,” she said. “I felt like I didn’t know how to learn. I didn’t know if I was smart enough to do it.”

But a move to Ohio provided her with a fresh start and connected her with a man who would provide the encouragement she needed to pursue her dream of becoming a nurse.

At Kent State University at Stark, Hosler also found the support, including low faculty-to-student class ratios, that she really needed to excel. Her professors knew her by name and that’s just what she would need when the unthinkable happened.

Hosler’s life with her husband, Chip, encompassed about a decade. They laughed together. enjoyed spending time with their pets at their Navarre home and shared special moments with Chip’s children and grandchildren.

“I never regret the decision — even with everything that happened,” said Hosler. “We were together a third of my life. It is very different being ‘Ottie and Chip’ to going back to being ‘just Ottie’ again and trying to figure out who I am.

“You mind goes to plans about us and our future to, ‘Oh my God, what do I do now.’ ”

Life left to live

Hosler holds tight to a photo of her husband cuddled on the couch with granddaughter, Davina. Taken the summer before he got sick, she likes to remember Chip in that way.

“He was fiercely loving, supportive and yet a private person, too,” Hosler said. “But he could be very stoic at times.”

His ability to endure hardship without complaining meant Hosler didn’t quite realize how sick her husband had gotten in March. The couple didn’t suspect COVID-19. In fact, Chip had recently taken his wife to purchase her medical scrubs, needed for the next step in her nursing education at Kent State Stark: critical care.

But soon, Chip’s cough got severe, and he was struggling to move without becoming winded. He stopped eating and started to lose pigmentation in his skin; Hosler knew these were all signs her husband needed medical intervention.

“I need you to consider going to the doctor,” she told him. When he asked her to drive him there, she knew the situation was serious. “Chip always drove.”

When they arrived at the hospital, tests revealed Chip was positive for COVID; his oxygen levels had dropped to the low 80s. Over the course of the next few days and weeks, his health continued to decline. Hosler said her husband made the decision to be placed on a ventilator, hopeful the outcome would be positive, but he also made plans.

“Before they intubated him, he wanted to talk to me about everything — the order he wanted me to call people in. ‘I want you to call your mom. Call my sister, Penny, and call Mason’,” Hosler said. “He wanted a good outcome. ‘If I can still have more time with you and the kids and the grandkids, I am willing to try.’ ”

Thanks to her nursing education, Hosler said she felt fortunate to understand all the ins and outs of what would happen next, like proning and how it might help her husband. She could answer concerned family’s questions and be confident in their chosen treatment.

“Chip told me he hoped that no matter what happened, I would finish my nursing degree,” Hosler said, “that I’d go on with our plans and that I just wouldn’t give up.”

She still tried to keep up with her studies throughout the time Chip was hospitalized. Hosler relied on the supportive team she had developed during her clinicals, as well as Kent State Stark professors Chrissy Kauth and Lyndy Beckley.

“They were there for me, providing constant help,” she said. “I knew if I needed anything, they wouldn’t hesitate.”

And just when it seemed Chip might get better, his health took a turn. Out-of-town family members were called in to say their goodbyes.

Chip was removed from the ventilator on April 9 and was gone within 10 minutes.

He was 56 years old.

“My husband was a young guy,” Hosler said. “He had a lot of life left to live. We had a lot of life left to live together.”

Showing the light

Today, Hosler is keeping her promise to her husband: she’s pursuing her education to earn a  Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree. Kauth encouraged her to apply for the Emergency Relief Fund, which has enabled her to continue her studies.

The fund, established during the COVID-19 pandemic, provides aid to students during a true emergency — right when tragedy strikes. Some Kent State Stark students have battled cancer, survived domestic violence and even a house fire that destroyed all their possessions. Yet another has juggled schoolwork while caring for a child born with birth defects.

“Professor Kauth told me all I needed to do was apply,” Hosler said. “Not only did I lose my husband, but I lost my home, I lost my dog, but I did gain a new sense of community… that’s what the field of nursing gives you. My family at Kent State Stark, my nursing class, my colleagues, they are like one big family. Giving up would have been easier, but when you have people who lift you up constantly, you can start rebuilding and be OK.”

Set to graduate in spring 2023, Hosler dedicates her accomplishments to all who have helped her along the way and providing hope to others going through tough times.

“I want people to know that I really needed that light they provide through everyday kindnesses, like the Emergency Relief Fund,” she said. “It meant the world to me to know that people care and there is hope out there. It doesn’t take a lot to show the light when someone is in a really dark place. When you are struggling, any little bit of help and reassurance can lift you up from the depths. It really can.”

As all good nurses know, it’s about being there to provide a helping hand at just the right time. And this Giving Tuesday, donors, too, have the power to extend aid so it’s within reach and set to change a life.

Provide a light for students, just like Ottie Hosler. When you give to the Emergency Relief Fund this Giving Tuesday, you give hope. And thanks to premier sponsor, Consumers National Bank, all gifts to the Emergency Relief Fund will be matched up to $5,000.

Players Guild Theatre
Wednesday, October 26, 2022

Kent State University at Stark is the new home to the Players Guild Theatre, now the resident theater company on campus. In October, the Players Guild held its inaugural production, “Million Dollar Quartet”, at The Mary J. Timken Theatre in the Fine Arts Building.

This summer, the Players Guild moved from the Cultural Center for the Arts in downtown Canton to the campus, where it will integrate new audiences and opportunities to incorporate Kent State Stark theater and music technology students into productions.

“It’s a true collaboration,” said Dean Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D. “We are very excited to welcome the Players Guild to its new home at Kent State University at Stark, and we are looking forward to the many opportunities for our students and the community.”

The Players Guild’s next show is Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”, opening Dec. 2 and running through Dec. 18. For 40 years, the Players Guild has brought this spectacular holiday classic to life on stage. In this adapted version, witness Dickens’ heartwarming story of a changed life that changes the world.

Shows will be at 7:30 p.m. Fridays; 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturdays; and 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $28 to $45 each and available online.

BUY PLAYERS GUILD THEATRE TICKETS
Other shows will include: “The Elephant Man” in January and February; “The Toxic Avenger” in March; “Misery” (based on the Stephen King novel) in April; and “The SpongeBob Musical” in May and June.

Memorial Garden at Kent State Stark
Monday, October 24, 2022

Thank you to all who have donated to the garden project at Kent State University at Stark!

While a ribbon-cutting ceremony was scheduled for fall, our campus is not exempt from supply-chain issues. As a result, we will look forward to celebrating with you at Kent State Stark in the summer.

PURCHASE AN ITEM OR MAKE A DONATION

The garden will feature a renovated campus gazebo and surrounding area outside Main Hall. This will create a thoughtful place for reflection featuring decorative bricks, garden stones, trees, flowers and benches for students, alumni, faculty, staff and community members.  

You may support this project by becoming a sponsor to honor relatives, friends, colleagues, businesses and organizations or commemorate a birthday, anniversary or graduation day.

Proceeds from this project will benefit the Kent State Stark Emergency Relief Fund.

Eric Taylor receives Outstanding Teaching Award
Eric Taylor receives Outstanding Teaching Award
Thursday, October 13, 2022

Congratulations to Eric Taylor, associate professor of geology, who was named a Kent State 2022 Outstanding Teaching Award recipient!

The University Teaching Council supports the Outstanding Teaching Awards which are presented at the annual College Teaching Conference in the fall.

Every year, three Kent State faculty members are honored with awards of $1,500 each for their outstanding achievements in teaching. The Outstanding Teaching Award is the highest teaching award accorded to non-tenure-track and part-time faculty at Kent State University. The award parallels the Distinguished Teaching Awards sponsored by the Kent Alumni Association.

Well done, Eric!

Erin Brockovich spoke at Kent State Stark on Sept. 13, 2022.
Tuesday, October 04, 2022

Erin Brockovich, the brash legal clerk turned environmental powerhouse, kicked off the 31st annual Featured Speakers Series at Kent State University at Stark in September.

Brockovich met with students in the campus’ Environmental Studies program and spoke about her experiences building a case against Pacific Gas & Electric Co. involving groundwater contamination in the small town of Hinkley, California, back in the 1990s. She also talked to students about the present-day water quality issues that span the world — from Flint, Michigan, to Camp Lejeune to Australia and beyond.

“I thought this was a one-time thing with Hinkley,” Brockovich said. “I had no idea how big this really is. Contamination of our water supply is still a major issue and it’s up to us to educate ourselves and stand up for our communities.”

Brockovich and her team have established the website, Community Healthbook at www.communityhealthbook.com, to enable everyday people to report and share information about water, air and land issues happening in their backyards.

 Brockovich, president of Brockovich Research & Consulting, is currently involved in numerous environmental projects worldwide. She also assists with groundwater contamination complaints in every state, as well as overseas. A bestselling author, her most recent book is “Superman’s Not Coming: Our National Water Crisis and What We the People Can Do About It.”

And while it’s been over 20 years since Julia Roberts starred in the Oscar-winning film, “Erin Brockovich”, it turned this unknown legal researcher into a 20th century icon by showcasing how her dogged persistence was the impelling force behind the largest medical settlement lawsuit in history.

Kent State and Mexican university students study over spring break at traditional chinampa farmers in Mexico
Thursday, August 18, 2022

Kent State University partnered with Universidad Panamericana in Mexico City for an international, cross-cultural exchange for students to study how sustainable gardening projects aid immigrant populations. 

The program enabled 11 Kent State students from the Stark and Kent campuses to spend their spring break in Mexico, and a group of 11 students from Universidad Panamericana (UP) to spend a week in Northeast Ohio in June, working at Shanti Community Farms in Akron’s North Hill neighborhood, which is home to large groups of immigrants. 

Sarah Scmidt, Global Education, Kent State Stark
Sarah Schmidt, assistant director of Global Education Initiatives at Kent State’s Stark Campus, spearheaded the project, which was three years in the making due to delays from the pandemic. The project, titled, “Sustainable Gardening for Poverty Reduction, Cultural Preservation and Economic Inclusion,” had a multifaceted goal, she said. 

Jada Howard, a junior majoring in pre-veterinary medicine, is one of the students who made the trip to Mexico. A first-generation college student from Canton, Ohio, Howard said the trip was a perfect fit for her minor in geology.  

She felt passionate about going on the Mexico trip after hearing Schmidt talk about the mission behind it. After experiencing the trip, Howard said she shares that passion. 

The program’s focus was to provide learning opportunities for Kent State and UP students, so they could gain knowledge and hands-on experience in areas of sustainable environmental science, entrepreneurship and financial inclusion. The deeper goal, Schmidt said, is for those experiences to make the students more well-informed future leaders with a well-rounded knowledge of issues of environment, entrepreneurship and economic inclusion and how they all intersect as part of the experience of immigrant communities. 

The students studied economic inclusion initiatives that incorporate sustainable gardening and indigenous farming practices among resettled populations in both Ohio and Mexico. Sustainable gardening is a way for immigrant populations to support themselves and reduce their poverty by being able to produce food for their people to consume and sell, Schmidt said. Their native farming techniques serve as a way for immigrant populations to preserve parts of their cultures in their adopted homelands. 

Spring Break Trip in Mexico 

For the Kent State students who traveled to Mexico, the week included meeting with resettled refugee populations from Central America living in Mexico City and visiting Xochimilco, a Mexican community of indigenous people directly descended from the Aztecs, who practice traditional chinampa farming. 

Chinampas are an indigenous and highly sustainable agriculture system made of a set of artificial floating islands. Schmidt described their huge and beautiful crops, free from chemical additives. "The technology is very simple, it’s all done by hand, no pesticides, what we would call organic.” 

Crops growing in on a chinampa farm in Mexico.

Schmidt explained that despite issues of economic inclusion and social marginalization, chinampa farmers of Xochimilco have sustained the traditional practices. 

“It was amazing,” Howard said, “To see how an entire community is literally fed by one man, that was very, very interesting. Some of those farmers live in very poor communities.”  

The students were able to plant seeds with the farmers, learn about how they continue to preserve their native farming techniques and learn how their communities managed to survive the pandemic. 

The chinampa, Schmidt said, reminded her of Ohio’s Amish communities, so she added a visit to Amish farms in Holmes County to the activities when the students from Universidad Panamericana came to Ohio. 

Even though Amish farmers are not recent immigrants, their traditional farming techniques and their way of life are rooted in preserving their cultural heritage, Schmidt noted. “In Xochimilco, I kept thinking about the Amish. There are so many similarities. They are resistant to chemicals and pesticides, (and) they farm by hand with traditional techniques.”   

Schmidt and her counterparts at Universidad Panamericana also worked with United Nations Mexico to help the Kent State students to have access to migrants who had been resettled into Mexico primarily from El Salvador. 

Howard said being able to meet with and interview families who are refugees and seeking asylum and to learn their stories and struggles was an eye-opening experience. 

“That’s stuff we would only see on the news,” Howard said, “Some of us don’t even know people who have tried to find a better life for themselves and to be able to get that firsthand experience, it was absolutely eye-opening and something I will cherish deeply forever.” 

On a philosophical level, Howard said the trip made her grateful for the life she has. “I have shaped the life that I get to live. I don’t have to get up in the morning and look over my shoulder and fear for my life as they do.” 

Mexican University Students Visit Northeast Ohio 

Visiting students from Universidad Panamericana tour Amish farms in Ohio's Holmes County.
At Shanti Farms, the students spent part of the week working on the farm and learning about the diverse crops they produce, and spent time developing projects, both economic and environmental, to help the farm and the immigrants who grow there. 

The economic group, Schmidt said, worked with a bike shop in Canton to develop a bicycle sharing program to help the students with their transportation issues getting around the Akron neighborhood. 

An environmental group provided research on Shanti Farms’ negative carbon contribution, and how the nonprofit can partner with a larger company to buy its net-negative carbon footprint to help its own goals toward carbon neutrality. 

As an example, Schmidt described how a manufacturing company with a large carbon footprint can buy the carbon negativity of a small farm such as Shanti to assist with its goal of being more carbon neutral. The large company can claim the farm’s carbon negativity to lower its own carbon footprint, and the cost of the purchase can be a big financial boon for a small operation like Shanti. 

The composting group also tested the farm’s soil and provided Shanti growers with an exact nitrogen calculation formula for the compost used to treat the soil to grow the healthiest crops. The students looked at school waste, organic waste and farm waste to produce the best formula, Schmidt said. 

The project has a strong, personal connection for Schmidt, who sits on the board of directors of Shanti Farms, which operates the International Peace Garden in Akron’s North Hill neighborhood, home to many resettled immigrant communities from Nepal, Bhutan, the Congo and other Central African areas. 

“For me, this is my personal connection, the larger scope of the social impact of the program, working with resettled communities and working with the UN Mexico,” Schmidt said. “The larger goal is to end up with shared best practices for asylum seekers and refugees in Akron and Mexico City, and connections made through our institutions.” 

She said Shanti Farms has been a strong partner with Kent State Stark for many years, as a source of internships and other learning for students, and Schmidt said she knows that collaboration will continue. 

Partnership with Universidad Panamericana 

Sarah Schmidt, Global Education, Kent State Stark teaches at Universidad Panamericana
The collaboration with Universidad Panamericana is also an effort that Schmidt said she hopes to see continue. Schmidt said she engaged with Salvador Rivas Aceves, Ph.D., an economics professor and assistant dean of research at the Mexican university, to develop the program. “It took us a couple of years to hash out all of the plans because of COVID, but that was OK because it grew in really great directions.” 

The project was made possible by a grant from the 100,000 Strong in the Americas Innovation Fund, an initiative supported by the U.S. Department of State, U.S. embassies and Partners of the Americas, in partnership with companies, foundations and educational institutions working to strengthen the collaboration among governments, business and academia, critical to economies in the Americas. 

Schmidt said she was familiar with the organization and was able to write a proposal for a grant that was offered specifically for programs focused on environmental issues and poverty reduction and included a component of northbound/southbound travel for its participants, which made the Kent State/ Universidad Panamericana collaboration a perfect fit. UP previously had been a partner for a program with nursing students from Kent State Stark. 

Schmidt and Vaneet Kaur, Ph.D., an assistant professor of Management & Information Systems at Stark, accompanied the students during the spring break trip in March. 

Reaching Underrepresented Students 

The group of Kent State students who took part was an academically diverse group of freshmen through seniors, representing both the Kent and Stark campuses and coming from 10 different majors, including geography, criminal science, environmental students, biology, international relations and business and economics. 

Schmidt said she has worked with underrepresented students on the Stark Campus and reached out to them specifically so that she could offer the spring break experience to as diverse a group as possible. Each student received $900 of the grant money for their travel expenses, making the trip affordable and attainable. The 11 Mexican students also received a similar travel stipend. 

Howard said without the grant money to pay for the spring break trip, she and other students may not have been able to afford to go. “It lowered my cost of going immensely.” 

Kent State Stark Student Jada Howard

Howard, who hopes to attend The Ohio State University to study veterinary medicine after she graduates, said Schmidt has been her mentor since she was a high school student involved in Kent State’s Rising Scholars Program. She opted to continue her college career at Kent State at Stark due to the relationships she had built during that time with faculty and staff on the Stark Campus. 

“I felt very welcomed into a community here,” she said.  

Being able to have travel-abroad/study-abroad experiences has deepened her educational experience with opportunities she didn’t even know were available. 

“I really have to say that Kent State at Stark has been absolutely amazing. I have yet to have a bad experience. Everybody, including the faculty and staff, are all so welcoming and amazing. There is a real sense of camaraderie here. Especially coming back in person, I came back strong. I am a Golden Flash and proud to be graduating from here.” 

Learn more about Kent State’s Rising Scholars Program here

 

Kent State and Mexican university students study over spring break at traditional chinampa farmers in Mexico
Thursday, August 18, 2022

Kent State University partnered with Universidad Panamericana in Mexico City for an international, cross-cultural exchange for students to study how sustainable gardening projects aid immigrant populations. 

The program enabled 11 Kent State students from the Stark and Kent campuses to spend their spring break in Mexico, and a group of 11 students from Universidad Panamericana (UP) to spend a week in Northeast Ohio in June, working at Shanti Community Farms in Akron’s North Hill neighborhood, which is home to large groups of immigrants. 

Sarah Scmidt, Global Education, Kent State Stark
Sarah Schmidt, assistant director of Global Education Initiatives at Kent State’s Stark Campus, spearheaded the project, which was three years in the making due to delays from the pandemic. The project, titled, “Sustainable Gardening for Poverty Reduction, Cultural Preservation and Economic Inclusion,” had a multifaceted goal, she said. 

Jada Howard, a junior majoring in pre-veterinary medicine, is one of the students who made the trip to Mexico. A first-generation college student from Canton, Ohio, Howard said the trip was a perfect fit for her minor in geology.  

She felt passionate about going on the Mexico trip after hearing Schmidt talk about the mission behind it. After experiencing the trip, Howard said she shares that passion. 

The program’s focus was to provide learning opportunities for Kent State and UP students, so they could gain knowledge and hands-on experience in areas of sustainable environmental science, entrepreneurship and financial inclusion. The deeper goal, Schmidt said, is for those experiences to make the students more well-informed future leaders with a well-rounded knowledge of issues of environment, entrepreneurship and economic inclusion and how they all intersect as part of the experience of immigrant communities. 

The students studied economic inclusion initiatives that incorporate sustainable gardening and indigenous farming practices among resettled populations in both Ohio and Mexico. Sustainable gardening is a way for immigrant populations to support themselves and reduce their poverty by being able to produce food for their people to consume and sell, Schmidt said. Their native farming techniques serve as a way for immigrant populations to preserve parts of their cultures in their adopted homelands. 

Spring Break Trip in Mexico 

For the Kent State students who traveled to Mexico, the week included meeting with resettled refugee populations from Central America living in Mexico City and visiting Xochimilco, a Mexican community of indigenous people directly descended from the Aztecs, who practice traditional chinampa farming. 

Chinampas are an indigenous and highly sustainable agriculture system made of a set of artificial floating islands. Schmidt described their huge and beautiful crops, free from chemical additives. "The technology is very simple, it’s all done by hand, no pesticides, what we would call organic.” 

Crops growing in on a chinampa farm in Mexico.

Schmidt explained that despite issues of economic inclusion and social marginalization, chinampa farmers of Xochimilco have sustained the traditional practices. 

“It was amazing,” Howard said, “To see how an entire community is literally fed by one man, that was very, very interesting. Some of those farmers live in very poor communities.”  

The students were able to plant seeds with the farmers, learn about how they continue to preserve their native farming techniques and learn how their communities managed to survive the pandemic. 

The chinampa, Schmidt said, reminded her of Ohio’s Amish communities, so she added a visit to Amish farms in Holmes County to the activities when the students from Universidad Panamericana came to Ohio. 

Even though Amish farmers are not recent immigrants, their traditional farming techniques and their way of life are rooted in preserving their cultural heritage, Schmidt noted. “In Xochimilco, I kept thinking about the Amish. There are so many similarities. They are resistant to chemicals and pesticides, (and) they farm by hand with traditional techniques.”   

Schmidt and her counterparts at Universidad Panamericana also worked with United Nations Mexico to help the Kent State students to have access to migrants who had been resettled into Mexico primarily from El Salvador. 

Howard said being able to meet with and interview families who are refugees and seeking asylum and to learn their stories and struggles was an eye-opening experience. 

“That’s stuff we would only see on the news,” Howard said, “Some of us don’t even know people who have tried to find a better life for themselves and to be able to get that firsthand experience, it was absolutely eye-opening and something I will cherish deeply forever.” 

On a philosophical level, Howard said the trip made her grateful for the life she has. “I have shaped the life that I get to live. I don’t have to get up in the morning and look over my shoulder and fear for my life as they do.” 

Mexican University Students Visit Northeast Ohio 

Visiting students from Universidad Panamericana tour Amish farms in Ohio's Holmes County.
At Shanti Farms, the students spent part of the week working on the farm and learning about the diverse crops they produce, and spent time developing projects, both economic and environmental, to help the farm and the immigrants who grow there. 

The economic group, Schmidt said, worked with a bike shop in Canton to develop a bicycle sharing program to help the students with their transportation issues getting around the Akron neighborhood. 

An environmental group provided research on Shanti Farms’ negative carbon contribution, and how the nonprofit can partner with a larger company to buy its net-negative carbon footprint to help its own goals toward carbon neutrality. 

As an example, Schmidt described how a manufacturing company with a large carbon footprint can buy the carbon negativity of a small farm such as Shanti to assist with its goal of being more carbon neutral. The large company can claim the farm’s carbon negativity to lower its own carbon footprint, and the cost of the purchase can be a big financial boon for a small operation like Shanti. 

The composting group also tested the farm’s soil and provided Shanti growers with an exact nitrogen calculation formula for the compost used to treat the soil to grow the healthiest crops. The students looked at school waste, organic waste and farm waste to produce the best formula, Schmidt said. 

The project has a strong, personal connection for Schmidt, who sits on the board of directors of Shanti Farms, which operates the International Peace Garden in Akron’s North Hill neighborhood, home to many resettled immigrant communities from Nepal, Bhutan, the Congo and other Central African areas. 

“For me, this is my personal connection, the larger scope of the social impact of the program, working with resettled communities and working with the UN Mexico,” Schmidt said. “The larger goal is to end up with shared best practices for asylum seekers and refugees in Akron and Mexico City, and connections made through our institutions.” 

She said Shanti Farms has been a strong partner with Kent State Stark for many years, as a source of internships and other learning for students, and Schmidt said she knows that collaboration will continue. 

Partnership with Universidad Panamericana 

Sarah Schmidt, Global Education, Kent State Stark teaches at Universidad Panamericana
The collaboration with Universidad Panamericana is also an effort that Schmidt said she hopes to see continue. Schmidt said she engaged with Salvador Rivas Aceves, Ph.D., an economics professor and assistant dean of research at the Mexican university, to develop the program. “It took us a couple of years to hash out all of the plans because of COVID, but that was OK because it grew in really great directions.” 

The project was made possible by a grant from the 100,000 Strong in the Americas Innovation Fund, an initiative supported by the U.S. Department of State, U.S. embassies and Partners of the Americas, in partnership with companies, foundations and educational institutions working to strengthen the collaboration among governments, business and academia, critical to economies in the Americas. 

Schmidt said she was familiar with the organization and was able to write a proposal for a grant that was offered specifically for programs focused on environmental issues and poverty reduction and included a component of northbound/southbound travel for its participants, which made the Kent State/ Universidad Panamericana collaboration a perfect fit. UP previously had been a partner for a program with nursing students from Kent State Stark. 

Schmidt and Vaneet Kaur, Ph.D., an assistant professor of Management & Information Systems at Stark, accompanied the students during the spring break trip in March. 

Reaching Underrepresented Students 

The group of Kent State students who took part was an academically diverse group of freshmen through seniors, representing both the Kent and Stark campuses and coming from 10 different majors, including geography, criminal science, environmental students, biology, international relations and business and economics. 

Schmidt said she has worked with underrepresented students on the Stark Campus and reached out to them specifically so that she could offer the spring break experience to as diverse a group as possible. Each student received $900 of the grant money for their travel expenses, making the trip affordable and attainable. The 11 Mexican students also received a similar travel stipend. 

Howard said without the grant money to pay for the spring break trip, she and other students may not have been able to afford to go. “It lowered my cost of going immensely.” 

Kent State Stark Student Jada Howard

Howard, who hopes to attend The Ohio State University to study veterinary medicine after she graduates, said Schmidt has been her mentor since she was a high school student involved in Kent State’s Rising Scholars Program. She opted to continue her college career at Kent State at Stark due to the relationships she had built during that time with faculty and staff on the Stark Campus. 

“I felt very welcomed into a community here,” she said.  

Being able to have travel-abroad/study-abroad experiences has deepened her educational experience with opportunities she didn’t even know were available. 

“I really have to say that Kent State at Stark has been absolutely amazing. I have yet to have a bad experience. Everybody, including the faculty and staff, are all so welcoming and amazing. There is a real sense of camaraderie here. Especially coming back in person, I came back strong. I am a Golden Flash and proud to be graduating from here.” 

Learn more about Kent State’s Rising Scholars Program here

 

Kent State and Mexican university students study over spring break at traditional chinampa farmers in Mexico
Thursday, August 18, 2022

Kent State University partnered with Universidad Panamericana in Mexico City for an international, cross-cultural exchange for students to study how sustainable gardening projects aid immigrant populations. 

The program enabled 11 Kent State students from the Stark and Kent campuses to spend their spring break in Mexico, and a group of 11 students from Universidad Panamericana (UP) to spend a week in Northeast Ohio in June, working at Shanti Community Farms in Akron’s North Hill neighborhood, which is home to large groups of immigrants. 

Sarah Scmidt, Global Education, Kent State Stark
Sarah Schmidt, assistant director of Global Education Initiatives at Kent State’s Stark Campus, spearheaded the project, which was three years in the making due to delays from the pandemic. The project, titled, “Sustainable Gardening for Poverty Reduction, Cultural Preservation and Economic Inclusion,” had a multifaceted goal, she said. 

Jada Howard, a junior majoring in pre-veterinary medicine, is one of the students who made the trip to Mexico. A first-generation college student from Canton, Ohio, Howard said the trip was a perfect fit for her minor in geology.  

She felt passionate about going on the Mexico trip after hearing Schmidt talk about the mission behind it. After experiencing the trip, Howard said she shares that passion. 

The program’s focus was to provide learning opportunities for Kent State and UP students, so they could gain knowledge and hands-on experience in areas of sustainable environmental science, entrepreneurship and financial inclusion. The deeper goal, Schmidt said, is for those experiences to make the students more well-informed future leaders with a well-rounded knowledge of issues of environment, entrepreneurship and economic inclusion and how they all intersect as part of the experience of immigrant communities. 

The students studied economic inclusion initiatives that incorporate sustainable gardening and indigenous farming practices among resettled populations in both Ohio and Mexico. Sustainable gardening is a way for immigrant populations to support themselves and reduce their poverty by being able to produce food for their people to consume and sell, Schmidt said. Their native farming techniques serve as a way for immigrant populations to preserve parts of their cultures in their adopted homelands. 

Spring Break Trip in Mexico 

For the Kent State students who traveled to Mexico, the week included meeting with resettled refugee populations from Central America living in Mexico City and visiting Xochimilco, a Mexican community of indigenous people directly descended from the Aztecs, who practice traditional chinampa farming. 

Chinampas are an indigenous and highly sustainable agriculture system made of a set of artificial floating islands. Schmidt described their huge and beautiful crops, free from chemical additives. "The technology is very simple, it’s all done by hand, no pesticides, what we would call organic.” 

Crops growing in on a chinampa farm in Mexico.

Schmidt explained that despite issues of economic inclusion and social marginalization, chinampa farmers of Xochimilco have sustained the traditional practices. 

“It was amazing,” Howard said, “To see how an entire community is literally fed by one man, that was very, very interesting. Some of those farmers live in very poor communities.”  

The students were able to plant seeds with the farmers, learn about how they continue to preserve their native farming techniques and learn how their communities managed to survive the pandemic. 

The chinampa, Schmidt said, reminded her of Ohio’s Amish communities, so she added a visit to Amish farms in Holmes County to the activities when the students from Universidad Panamericana came to Ohio. 

Even though Amish farmers are not recent immigrants, their traditional farming techniques and their way of life are rooted in preserving their cultural heritage, Schmidt noted. “In Xochimilco, I kept thinking about the Amish. There are so many similarities. They are resistant to chemicals and pesticides, (and) they farm by hand with traditional techniques.”   

Schmidt and her counterparts at Universidad Panamericana also worked with United Nations Mexico to help the Kent State students to have access to migrants who had been resettled into Mexico primarily from El Salvador. 

Howard said being able to meet with and interview families who are refugees and seeking asylum and to learn their stories and struggles was an eye-opening experience. 

“That’s stuff we would only see on the news,” Howard said, “Some of us don’t even know people who have tried to find a better life for themselves and to be able to get that firsthand experience, it was absolutely eye-opening and something I will cherish deeply forever.” 

On a philosophical level, Howard said the trip made her grateful for the life she has. “I have shaped the life that I get to live. I don’t have to get up in the morning and look over my shoulder and fear for my life as they do.” 

Mexican University Students Visit Northeast Ohio 

Visiting students from Universidad Panamericana tour Amish farms in Ohio's Holmes County.
At Shanti Farms, the students spent part of the week working on the farm and learning about the diverse crops they produce, and spent time developing projects, both economic and environmental, to help the farm and the immigrants who grow there. 

The economic group, Schmidt said, worked with a bike shop in Canton to develop a bicycle sharing program to help the students with their transportation issues getting around the Akron neighborhood. 

An environmental group provided research on Shanti Farms’ negative carbon contribution, and how the nonprofit can partner with a larger company to buy its net-negative carbon footprint to help its own goals toward carbon neutrality. 

As an example, Schmidt described how a manufacturing company with a large carbon footprint can buy the carbon negativity of a small farm such as Shanti to assist with its goal of being more carbon neutral. The large company can claim the farm’s carbon negativity to lower its own carbon footprint, and the cost of the purchase can be a big financial boon for a small operation like Shanti. 

The composting group also tested the farm’s soil and provided Shanti growers with an exact nitrogen calculation formula for the compost used to treat the soil to grow the healthiest crops. The students looked at school waste, organic waste and farm waste to produce the best formula, Schmidt said. 

The project has a strong, personal connection for Schmidt, who sits on the board of directors of Shanti Farms, which operates the International Peace Garden in Akron’s North Hill neighborhood, home to many resettled immigrant communities from Nepal, Bhutan, the Congo and other Central African areas. 

“For me, this is my personal connection, the larger scope of the social impact of the program, working with resettled communities and working with the UN Mexico,” Schmidt said. “The larger goal is to end up with shared best practices for asylum seekers and refugees in Akron and Mexico City, and connections made through our institutions.” 

She said Shanti Farms has been a strong partner with Kent State Stark for many years, as a source of internships and other learning for students, and Schmidt said she knows that collaboration will continue. 

Partnership with Universidad Panamericana 

Sarah Schmidt, Global Education, Kent State Stark teaches at Universidad Panamericana
The collaboration with Universidad Panamericana is also an effort that Schmidt said she hopes to see continue. Schmidt said she engaged with Salvador Rivas Aceves, Ph.D., an economics professor and assistant dean of research at the Mexican university, to develop the program. “It took us a couple of years to hash out all of the plans because of COVID, but that was OK because it grew in really great directions.” 

The project was made possible by a grant from the 100,000 Strong in the Americas Innovation Fund, an initiative supported by the U.S. Department of State, U.S. embassies and Partners of the Americas, in partnership with companies, foundations and educational institutions working to strengthen the collaboration among governments, business and academia, critical to economies in the Americas. 

Schmidt said she was familiar with the organization and was able to write a proposal for a grant that was offered specifically for programs focused on environmental issues and poverty reduction and included a component of northbound/southbound travel for its participants, which made the Kent State/ Universidad Panamericana collaboration a perfect fit. UP previously had been a partner for a program with nursing students from Kent State Stark. 

Schmidt and Vaneet Kaur, Ph.D., an assistant professor of Management & Information Systems at Stark, accompanied the students during the spring break trip in March. 

Reaching Underrepresented Students 

The group of Kent State students who took part was an academically diverse group of freshmen through seniors, representing both the Kent and Stark campuses and coming from 10 different majors, including geography, criminal science, environmental students, biology, international relations and business and economics. 

Schmidt said she has worked with underrepresented students on the Stark Campus and reached out to them specifically so that she could offer the spring break experience to as diverse a group as possible. Each student received $900 of the grant money for their travel expenses, making the trip affordable and attainable. The 11 Mexican students also received a similar travel stipend. 

Howard said without the grant money to pay for the spring break trip, she and other students may not have been able to afford to go. “It lowered my cost of going immensely.” 

Kent State Stark Student Jada Howard

Howard, who hopes to attend The Ohio State University to study veterinary medicine after she graduates, said Schmidt has been her mentor since she was a high school student involved in Kent State’s Rising Scholars Program. She opted to continue her college career at Kent State at Stark due to the relationships she had built during that time with faculty and staff on the Stark Campus. 

“I felt very welcomed into a community here,” she said.  

Being able to have travel-abroad/study-abroad experiences has deepened her educational experience with opportunities she didn’t even know were available. 

“I really have to say that Kent State at Stark has been absolutely amazing. I have yet to have a bad experience. Everybody, including the faculty and staff, are all so welcoming and amazing. There is a real sense of camaraderie here. Especially coming back in person, I came back strong. I am a Golden Flash and proud to be graduating from here.” 

Learn more about Kent State’s Rising Scholars Program here

 

Erin Brockovich Sold Out
Featured Speaker Erin Brockovich
Tuesday, August 02, 2022

Updated Thursday, Aug. 18 at 11 a.m.

SOLD OUT - NO TICKETS REMAIN


Tickets will be available Aug. 15 for Erin Brockovich, the brash legal clerk turned environmental powerhouse, who has been rescheduled to speak at Kent State University at Stark as part of the campus’ Featured Speakers Series.

Brockovich will speak at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13, in Timken Great Hall at the Kent State University at Stark Conference Center, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. Doors will open at 6:45 p.m. 

Beginning Aug. 15, pick up tickets in the Office of Student Services, 132 Main Hall, during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday. 

  • Due to limited seating capacity, tickets will not be honored from Brockovich’s previously scheduled speaking engagement in April.
  • New tickets must be obtained.
  • View ticket details.

The Featured Speakers Series is free and open to the public, but tickets are required and limited to two per person. Ticket distribution is first-come, first-served. No phone or email reservations will be taken, nor will tickets be mailed. All tickets are general admission.

About Erin Brockovich

While it’s been over 20 years since Julia Roberts starred in the Oscar-winning film, “Erin Brockovich”, it turned this unknown legal researcher into a 20th century icon by showcasing how her dogged persistence was the impelling force behind the largest medical settlement lawsuit in history.

Today, Brockovich is president of Brockovich Research & Consulting, and she is currently involved in numerous environmental projects worldwide. She has requests for her help in groundwater contamination complaints in every state within the country, Australia and other international hot spots. A best-selling author, Brockovich’s latest release, “Superman’s Not Coming: Our National Water Crisis and What We the People Can Do About It”, drew wide media attention before its publication.

The Featured Speakers Series is now in its 31st season. Find more information by visiting www.kent.edu/stark/featured-speakers-series. For disability accommodations, please email starkcmc@kent.edu.
 

The Players Guild Theatre will be vacating the Cultural Center for the Arts on Aug. 31.
The Players Guild Theatre will be vacating the Cultural Center for the Arts on Aug. 31.
Thursday, June 30, 2022

Published June 30, 2022, in The Repository. Written by Kelsey Davis. Photo by Ed Balint.
 

ArtsinStark announced Thursday morning that the Players Guild Theatre will leave the Cultural Center for the Arts in downtown Canton and move to Kent State University at Stark.

After months of review by the Players Guild Board of Directors, the organization decided to leave the 416-seat main stage and 139-seat black box space, notifying ArtsinStark on June 23. Officials from ArtsinStark and the Players Guild met June 29 to discuss details of the separation.

In a news release from ArtsinStark, Players Guild Theatre Board President Dan Sibila stated four reasons for the move. 

“Moving to Kent State Stark provides a business model that, one, builds a partnering program with a well-funded higher education system; two, creates a collaborative program with KSU students and faculty that drives our collective goal of arts enrichment within Stark County; three, provides student internships and practicum opportunities with one PGT title being produced in total collaboration with Kent State students and faculty; and four, creates a farm system to cultivate future producers and management, thereby ensuring organizational longevity,” Sibila said.

ArtsinStark President and CEO David Whitehill had nothing but well wishes for the Players Guild.

“I’ll say that ArtsinStark affirms its support for this transition," Whitehill said. "We wish the Players Guild the best in its new home.”

“For 51 years, the Players Guild Theatre has been an integral part of the Cultural Center for the Arts. Many in our community have enjoyed the fantastic shows and programs the Players Guild has offered on the Main Stage and in W.G. Fry Theatre,” Whitehill said.

Performing arts companies moving to university campuses isn’t new. It has become a trend in Northeast Ohio. The University of Akron houses the Rubber City Theatre, and Light Opera is housed at the College of Wooster.

Kent State University at Stark Dean and Chief Administrative Officer Dr. Denise Seachrist is looking forward to the move.

“The KSU Stark students and faculty are excited to welcome the Players Guild Theatre to perform on the Mary J. Timken stage. The new Players Guild business model will complement our fine arts program for both current and future students,” Seachrist said in a news release.

The Players Guild intends to vacate the Cultural Center space on Aug. 31.

When asked if the Players Guild would no longer be attached to ArtsinStark, Whitehill was quick to say that ArtsinStark still supports it.

“We say we’re a countywide organization. We support through advocacy efforts, through funding and grant-making efforts and also our facilities, and certainly, we intend – like with all our arts organizations – to continue to support them in the ways they need to be supported," Whitehill said. 

What does this move mean for the Cultural Center for the Arts going forward?

“We’re really at the early stages now that the Players Guild has notified us of their intent to vacate the facility and move their operations to Kent State Stark. We’ll begin our process of exploring the possibilities for the space,” Whitehill said. “It’s an incredible facility. It can be used in a variety of different ways, and certainly, we have a number of community partners that have expressed interest over the years in using that space, so that’s, I guess, the exciting work ahead.”

Earlier this year, ArtsinStark retained Webb Management Services, a national company with representation in Ohio that provides consulting services to the arts and cultural industries, to undergo a three-phase cultural asset study that includes an assessment of the Cultural Center campus. 

The assessment was paused during the the Players Guild’s due-diligence period so that a Phase I report can include the future use of the 37,000-square-foot theater space that, in addition to performance spaces, includes offices, rehearsal space, a green room, lobby and dressing rooms. 

Full story: www.cantonrep.com/story/entertainment/2022/06/30/players-guild-theatre-…

Stark Campus Contact:
Melissa Seeton
mseeton@kent.edu

 

 

Stark Spring 2022 Deans List
Stark Spring 2022 Deans List
Monday, June 27, 2022

Kent State University at Stark has announced its Dean’s List and President’s List for the spring 2022 semester. 

Requirements for the Dean’s List include a 3.40 grade point average or above for the spring 2022 semester and at least 12 letter-graded (A, B, etc.) credit hours completed by the end of the semester.

President’s List criteria are a 4.00 grade point and at least 15 letter-graded credit hours completed by the end of the semester.

A part-time Dean's List follows the President's and Dean's List.
 

SPRING 2022 PRESIDENT'S* & DEAN'S LIST

The following students have been named to the Kent State Stark Dean’s List. Those students designated with a star (*) have been named to the Kent State University President’s List. 

Alexandra Abood 
Claire Adams 
Hannah Agosta 
Haleigh Alexander 
Syed Ahmed Ali 
Kaley Anderson 
Nicholas Angle 
Ethan Armstrong 
Juliette Azipoh 
Rachel Bachman 
Maya Bachtel *
Alyssa Baker 
Evan Balla 
Samantha Baranek 
Jacob Barton 
Elaine Bast 
Samantha Battista 
Alexa Battista *
Mason Batty 
Rachel Beam 
Kamri Beard 
Brandon Beavers 
Caitlin Beckett 
Cody Bennett 
Robert Bever *
Emma Bezek 
Justin Bioni 
Kylie Birchfield 
Brandy Bishop *
Kade Bitikofer 
Kylie Blair *
Hannah Blakemore 
Joshua Blasko 
Nathan Blough 
Joshua Boggs 
Joseph Bohbot 
Olivia Bohon 
Joshua Boley *
Mackayli Bolyard-Pizana *
Isabella Bouzari *
Rachel Bowe 
LaKaleb Bowen 
Maxx Bowman 
Constance Bozeman 
Hunter Bradley 
Kathleen Brady 
Jonathan Brand 
Kayleigh Brandon 
Collin Brink 
Micah Brogan 
Rylee Brown 
Selah Brown 
Spencer Brown 
McKenna Brown 
John Browning 
Jordan Browning *
Tyler Bulone 
Elizabeth Burleson 
Emily Cannone 
Oneal Cardinal 
Christian Carmichael 
Lauren Carpenter 
Brandi Carter 
Clay Casper 
Morgan Casper *
Deanna Chatman 
Ashley Cherubini 
Sarah Chlysta 
Helen Clark 
Anna Clark 
Amanda Clark 
Anna Clark *
Makayla Clos *
Hannah Coblentz 
Robyn Cochran 
Colton Cochran 
Lyndsay Cole 
Joshua Cole 
Breanna Cole 
Kylee Coles 
Kiersten Congrove *
Chloe Cook 
Kloe Cooper 
Marissa Cooper *
Rebecca Cottrell 
Sean Craney 
Brayden Crites 
Olivia Crone 
Madelyn Cuckovich 
Isabelle Cullen 
Molly Cunningham 
Taylur Cunningham *
Devan Curet 
Nathan Cutting 
Nathan Cutting *
Steven Danko 
Adam Davis 
Spencer Day 
Maya Demchak 
Desiree' DeMeo 
Kaylin Demsey 
Isabella DePasquale 
Trisha Derheimer 
Arabella Dillard 
Natalie DiRuzza 
Max Dixon 
Noah Doerschuk 
April Doyle *
DeLynn Drescher *
Nathan Dugan 
Joshua Dunn 
Daniel Earley *
Olivia Easterday 
McKenzie Ecrement 
Conrad Edmisten 
Katherine Edwards *
Theodore ElFaye 
Elijah Eller 
Tyler Ely 
Haley Evans 
Alexis Faudree 
Morgan Feemster 
Erin Fenk 
Brandon Finch 
Audrey Flanagan 
Madison Foutz 
Amanda Fowler *
Olivia Francis 
Tyler Friend 
Claire Fuller 
Joseph Fuller 
Paige Gallina 
Maxwell Gangl 
Sean Gayler 
Samuel Gentile 
Hannah Gill *
Taylor Grasse 
Victoria Graves 
Jenna Graves *
Haley Gray 
Frasher Gray 
Brenden Greaves 
Robyn Green 
Gabrielle Grimes 
Adam Gross 
Jagr Groubert 
Kyle Gruber 
Maria Gutierrez Davila 
McKenzie Haidet *
Courtney Haines 
Caden Haines 
Aleah Hall 
Emma Halvorson 
Mary Hammel *
Kaitlynn Hanslik *
Jeremiah Harbour 
Kayla Harland 
Charlie Harless 
Sydney Harris 
Kelly Harter *
Claire Haswell 
Chelsea Hatfield 
Jacob Hausch 
Briana Hawkins 
Sarah Heaps 
Nicholas Hearn 
Anna Henson 
Destiny Henson 
Raini Hershey 
Alexandra Hill 
Imari Hill *
Andreas Hilterbrand 
Katelyn Hippich 
Bryn Hocking 
Lana Hollis 
Nicholas Hoover 
Anne Hornyak 
Emma House 
Jada Howard 
Kaylee Hoyt
Govan Hudson *
Jocelyn Hughes 
Candace Hull 
Hope Hutchings 
Sarah Iden 
Tanner Immel 
Camryn Jackson 
Ayesha Jamil 
Caitlin Jarzenski 
Chase Jeffries 
Stephen Johanyak 
Andrea Johnson 
Paige Johnson 
Audrey Jokovich 
Matthew Jones 
Hanna Jones *
Hayleigh Jordan 
Cate Katigbak 
Kendall Kelley 
Erin Kelly 
Dylan Kelsey 
William Kennedy 
Joshua Kirsch 
Ashley Klebs 
Abigail Klein 
Bailey Kline 
Ashley Knoch 
Katelyn Konetsky *
Selena Konjovic 
Sophie Konstantacos 
Kellie Kordinak *
Kylie Kovatch 
Gavin Krall 
Jacob Kritzell 
Madeline Kurtz 
Aubrey Ladd 
Emerson Lancaster 
Kaitlyn Leasure 
Miranda Legg 
Emma Lego 
Anthony Leighton 
Claire Lenhart 
Rebecca Leslein 
Rebecca Leyman 
Julia Lockwood 
Shawn Luben 
Grace Lucarelli 
Madalyne Ludovici 
Payton Lutz 
Jordan Lyden 
Haley Magee 
Nicholas Maio 
Kayla Maloof 
Brandon Manda 
Sarah Maranville 
Christopher Marcic 
Nicole Marran *
Lucas Marsh 
Joclynn Marshall 
Phillip Martin 
Jessica Mathews *
Tessa Maurer 
Jennifer May 
Lauren May 
Elaina Mazzocca 
Nicole Mcabee 
Ethan McAbee 
Alyssa McCarthy *
Adam McCloskey 
Janelle McConnell 
Taylor McIntyre *
Andrew McMasters 
Dylan Mease 
Jennifer Mellinger *
Dominic Merlitti 
MaKell Merrick *
Hannah Messner *
Madison Meszaros *
Thomas Metz 
Kayla Michels 
Kathryn Milek 
Frank Milinkovich 
Max Miller 
Joseph Miller 
Nathaniel Miller 
Amanda Miller *
Joshua Minor 
Lane Mitchell 
Abby Mizener 
Katelyn Mizener 
Kennedy Moore 
Alexander Moore 
Naomi Morehart 
Emma Mori 
Jessica Morton 
Sherilynn Mullett 
Melissa Myers 
Carlie Myers *
Elizabeth Narris *
Merina Nicholas 
Kaitlyn Nicholson *
Edith Nkeze 
Allyson Nofsinger 
Brianna Nutter 
Taylor O'Lear 
Hunter Ohm 
John Ohman 
Chloe Orin 
Laura Oster 
Joan Oster 
Alyssa Owens 
Logan Palmer 
Grant Palmer 
Madison Petersen 
Jason Phillips 
Renee Pike 
Colin Porter 
Riley Pullen 
Daniel Rader 
Megan Radtke 
Miranda Rambaud 
Miranda Rasicci 
Alia Ray 
Kaitlyn Ream 
Eliviya Reed 
Joseph Reeves 
Luke Rhodes 
Rylie Rich 
Lindsey Ricker 
Emily Rider 
Charleigh Riffle *
Liam Roach 
Olivia Robertson 
Angela Robinette 
Dannylle Rohr 
Lauren Rohr 
Lilyan Ronske 
Miranda Rosato 
Brandon Ross 
Steven Rudder *
Madisyn Rummell 
Ronna Russell *
Kayla Saffell 
Samantha Samblanet 
Ashish Sangar 
Samantha Schippert 
Alexander Schlabach 
Amber Schumacher 
Benjamin Seaman 
Jacob Seffern 
Brenna Seifert 
Shana Shultz 
Aaron Simeone 
Lane Simpson 
John Sipahioglu 
Morgan Skala 
Austin Sklack 
Kaela Skubic 
Taylor Slone 
Ashlee Slutz *
Lexy Smith 
Julia Smith 
Katelynne Smith 
Natalie Smith 
Bradley Smith 
Julia Smith *
Corey Snow 
Leah Snow *
Alexander Snyder 
Samantha Soisson 
Emily Spencer 
Makayla Spoon 
Alyssa Sporup 
Jenna Stanley 
Mason Steed 
Maria Steve 
Robin Storad *
Naleese Strickland 
Riley Sullivan 
Benjamin Swartz *
Madison Swartzentruber *
Alexander Sweeney *
Kyle Swym 
Ana Tahir 
Chase Tanner 
Keith Tector 
Cameron Telesz 
Camille Tenney 
Olivia Terranova 
Ginger Thomas 
Juliette Thomas 
Joshua Thomas 
Dyllon Thompson 
MaKenzie Thrasher 
Ethan Tonkel *
Brody Tonn 
Kayla Trigg 
Steven Turik 
Lana Ulrich 
Kaitlyn Unklesbay *
Emma Valetta 
Krista Vallant 
Austin Vandegrift *
Hayley Vangorp 
Jaban VanKirk 
Kayla VanKirk 
Nicole Vargo *
Athena Vohs 
Evan Voyk 
Kaitlyn Wallace *
Hannah Wallis 
Sharon Walsh 
Kathryn Walsh *
Joshua Warren 
Brent Warring 
Autumn Wassam 
Laura Waters 
Rachael Wayts 
Hailey Weaver 
Hailey Weaver *
Andrew Weissert 
Haley Weller 
Tori Wells 
Madelyn Wells *
Makenzie Westfall 
Morgan Wetherholt 
Brayden Wikoff 
Justin Wilcox 
Joshua Wiles 
Beau Wilkinson 
Kylie Williams 
Collin Wilson 
Katherine Wise 
Ashley Wise 
Fox Witt 
Bailey Witwer 
Cassandra Wolfe 
Jacob Woodling 
Chase Woods 
William Wright 
Esaias Wright 
Katelin Yoho 
Joseph Zeitler 
Griffen Zemrock 
Alexa Ziler 
Spencer Zolla 
Dawn Zuniga 
April Zurbrugg 


SPRING 2022 PART-TIME DEAN'S LIST

The following have been named to the Dean's List for part-time students:

Abigail Abood
Alexander Adams
Seth Bailey
Steven Baker
Claire Baker
Cimarron Barnes
Sandra Beavers
Melissa Becerra
Olivia Bender
Sarah Betz
Jessica Birney
Taylor Blankenship
Corrine Bowman
Saddi Brown
Dylanne Buchanan
Justin Burkett
Amanda Butts
Allison Cabuk
Lacy Campbell
Kaylin Cargould
Andrew Carozza
Jenna Cassidy
Kayla Caudill
Sydney Cooper
Kaylee Croft
Katelyn Croyle
Thomas Croyle
Alisyn Davis
Della Davis
Samantha Davis
Emelia Days
Trevor Dearing
Victor DeMarco
Eric Desilets
Aine Donley
Sydnie Dye
Connie Ellis
Courtney Englehart
Zackery Evans
Trace Fabre
Haley Famy
Andrew Fawver
Grace Fisak
Nathan Fontes
Amirah Fouad
Kendal Gannet
Avari Gedeon
Saige Gleason
Sydnee Goff
Julia Gregory
Gavin Haley
Taylor Hall
Erin Halsey
Morgan Hancock
Kurtis Hart
April Hazaimeh
Hailey Heath
Jordan Herceg
Gabrielle Hickman
Christin Hinton
Kathryn Hughes
Rosalia Isenberg
Braylon James
Mariela Jasso-Lopez
Snezana Jelic
Madillyn Jennings
Gregory Johannes
Brian Jones
Maxwell Kemats
Adam Kieffer
Nathan Kneidel
Mackenzie Knoll
Davin Koskinen
Taylor Krueger
Jennifer Lambert
Joseph Lockhart
Sarah Lucas
Gabriella Luevano
Jacob Lyon
Shelby Mamajek
Samuel Marazita
Macy Martin
Brooklyn Mazzocca
Kaitlyn Mazzocca
Erica McAlpine
Audrey McAmis
Kaylie McCann
Ian McCartt
Brandon McCune
Christina McDaniel
Melissa McDonough
Aine McGee
Katherine McMullen
Madelyn Mealer
Amelia Melcher
Jarrett Mohler
Karsyn Moore
Kaden Moser
Molly Muckelrath
Gabrielle Muckley
Heather Mullins
Carter Murray
Kendall Myers
Brandan Nicholas
Zoe Noel
Hannah Nussbaum
Jolie Oberlin
Chelsea Ohler
Matthew Oster
Bennett Pandrea
Riddhi Patel
Creed Patterson
Emma Peterson
Emma Pratt
Kelly Rach
Levi Rader
Abigail Rambler
Mamoni Ray
Nicole Resar
Tegan Richards
Alaina Rini-John
Lauren Rogers
Aiden Roman
Kaylee Rubright
Emily Sadler
Cory Sampsel
Korrin Sampson
Maxwell Sanzo
Deborah Schrock
William Schumacher
Leah Scott
Michael Sheets
Gavin Shenal
Marcus Simon
Summer Sinsley
Brittany Small
Liam Spencer
Adelynne Steed
Aubrey Stonestreet
Madelyn Stonestreet
Hannah Stroup
Kaedyn Sutton
Jack Swartz
Brad Tavan
Arianna Terakedis
Nicholas Tomola
Lexi Troyer
Addie Tucke
Zoe Turner
Alexis Vazquez
Denver Wadian
Kathleen Wayt
Mia Weaver
Sydney Weinland
Virginia Welch
Mackenzie Wells
Alexander Wennerstrom
Deavion Wilkins
Julie Wilson
Drake Wilson
McKenzie Wilson
Alex Winters
Jessica Wisniewski
Kaitlynn Yoder
Evan Yost

Alexis Baker receives the 2021-22 Distinguished Teaching Award at Kent State Stark.
Tuesday, June 07, 2022

Alexis Baker, Ph.D., knows that making a real difference begins in the classroom. That’s why it is one of her top goals to ensure students are engaged and empowered. She sparks debate and encourages participation in all of her English courses — and she’s making an impact.

“Dr. Baker has proven herself to be an incredible professor,” said one student. “Not only does Dr. Baker genuinely value every student’s contribution to class discussion, but she also ends every class by telling us how much she enjoyed hearing our thoughts. These actions make her students feel heard and appreciated.”

Baker, assistant professor of English, was awarded the 2022 Distinguished Teaching Award at Kent State University at Stark’s Commencement, held May 13 at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium.

“Dr. Baker is the first English instructor that I’ve had who has kept me engaged in class. I hated English/writing with a passion before I started taking her class. But now I actually kind of enjoy it,” said another student in their nomination of Baker for the teaching award. “She’s very accepting of everyone and genuinely cares for each student’s well-being. … Overall, she is a wonderful professor and just a wonderful person in general and she definitely deserves this award.” 

The Distinguished Teaching Award is presented each year to a member of the resident faculty in recognition of exceptional classroom teaching. In 1974, Kent State Stark gave its first Distinguished Teaching Award, the highest teaching honor bestowed by the campus.

Finalists for the 2022 Distinguished Teaching Award were: Ann Martinez, Ph.D., associate professor of English; and A. Bathi Kasturiarachi, Ph.D., associate professor of mathematical sciences. 

Inspiring music and minds 

Aaron ShayAaron Shay, who teaches courses for Kent State Stark’s Department of Music, received the 2022 Award of Distinction. 

The Award of Distinction is presented annually to an outstanding member of the adjunct faculty. Such faculty teach in a variety of subjects and bring a wealth of real-world experience and a passion for teaching to the classroom.       

A longtime instructor at the campus, it’s clear Shay is a role model to his students, while teaching about the art of music.

“I had never been so inspired by a professor before,” said one student nominator. “Professor Shay motivates me to be the best student I can be because of all the knowledge he shares with me. He is the type of person I want to be in my future. He is the most fascinating human being I’ve ever met.”

 
Learn more about the Distinguished Teaching Award and Award of Distinction at Kent State Stark.
 

Kent State Stark Academic Achievement Awards
Kent State Stark Academic Achievement Awards
Monday, May 23, 2022


Denise A. Seachrist, DeanKent State University at Stark proudly celebrates the educational accomplishments and the students who help make our campus one of excellence. And, perhaps now more than ever, these academic achievements carry an even greater weight. After all, we have faced the COVID-19 pandemic together. We have overcome so much — and have much to be grateful for.
 
We salute your contributions to academic excellence. As tomorrow’s leaders, reaching milestones like the ones we celebrate today, bestowing our 2022 Academic Achievement Awards, will propel you to make your mark on the world beyond these walls.
 
Along with your family and friends, the faculty and staff at Kent State Stark commend you on reaching this high academic accomplishment.
 
As your dean, I am proud of you. Your grit and determination have brought you to this milestone during extraordinary circumstances.
 
You are a remarkable group of students. I not only say thank you for making our world brighter, but I congratulate each of you on your academic accomplishments and wish you continued success as you go on to claim your future.

Denise A. Seachrist signature
Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Stark


The Kent State Stark community is proud to recognize the achievements of our academically talented students.

The following groups of students are to be commended for their accomplishments over the past academic year.

PRESIDENT’S LIST

In recognition of academic excellence, a President’s List is compiled each term. To qualify, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average and must have completed 15 or more credit hours during the semester.


HONORS PROGRAM THESIS

In recognition of Kent State Stark Honors Program students who have completed an Honors thesis.


DEPARTMENTAL AWARDS

Acknowledging excellence in a specific field of study, Kent State Stark students are honored by faculty members within the discipline.

VIEW ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS WEBSITE

Spring 2021 Commencement at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium
Thursday, May 12, 2022

Kent State University at Stark graduates are set to take Canton’s biggest stage May 13 during the 49th Annual Spring Commencement Ceremony at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium.

Stark County’s only public university is honored to celebrate its newest graduates. Renato "Ren" Camacho, president and chief executive officer at the Akron-Canton Airport, will present the keynote address. Read more about Ren Camacho.

The ceremony will be livestreamed beginning at 4 p.m.

Commencement Ceremony details are as follows:

Kent State University at Stark
49th Annual Spring Commencement
Friday, May 13, 2022, at 4 p.m.  
Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium
2331 17th St. NW, Canton

COMMENCEMENT WEBSITE     CEREMONY LIVESTREAM


GATES OPEN AT 2:30 P.M.

Tickets are required for admittance. Guests will be directed to the general seating area.

Graduates will be directed to the check-in table upon arrival. Plan to be settled in your seat no later than 3:15 p.m. Come dressed in your cap and gown. You'll have an opportunity to have your photo taken with Dean Seachrist before the ceremony begins. Our staff will provide you with instructions when you arrive.

The ceremony will start promptly at 4 p.m. 


PARKING & DIRECTIONS

The best way to enter the stadium parking lot is from 17th St., coming from the west from either Broad or Clarendon. For navigation purposes, use this address: 2331 17th St. NW, Canton. There is ample parking but not directly adjacent to the stadium. Expect a walk to the entrance gate

ACCESSIBLE PARKING & SEATING

Guests requiring special parking must have a valid handicapped parking permit and will be directed to parking. There will be a place to drop off guests with mobility issues near the gate. Please note: Plan for a lengthy inclined walk into the stadium. Ample accessible seating is available.

VIEW PARKING AREA MAP


DRESS COMFORTABLY FOR WARM WEATHER

The weather forecast is predicting sunny skies and temperatures in the low-80s. You may be sitting in the sun for the hour-long ceremony so wear sunscreen if needed. Make sure you're dressed comfortably.


PROHIBITED ITEMS

As a courtesy to all guests, we ask that family and friends do not bring large items like balloon bouquets and oversized signs that would block the viewing of other guests. Umbrellas are not permitted in the stadium.

2022 Staff Excellence Award Recipients
Tuesday, April 26, 2022

After a year marked by transition, the 2022 Staff Excellence Awards celebrated the strong and resilient campus community at Kent State University at Stark. 

“It may well be that there is light at the end of the long pandemic tunnel,” Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., dean and chief administrative officer, told staff gathered at the Fine Arts Building for the April 26 ceremony. “However, many of us can still see it in our rearview mirror and recognize that we have not emerged unscathed. For all that we have been through, I want to offer my sincere gratitude for your hard work, dedication and resilience.”

Staff returned to a fully in-person workplace last summer after the COVID-19 pandemic triggered a remote working environment throughout much of 2020 and the first half of 2021. 

The 2021-2022 academic year also was marked by tragedy for staff, who lost a dear friend and colleague, Debra “Debbie” Schneider, on Feb. 26 after a valiant battle against cancer. 

A longtime member of the Stark Campus community, Schneider had recently celebrated 40 years of service at Stark, which is over half of the campus’ 75-year history. For the past seven years, she worked alongside Seachrist as her administrative assistant. 

Schneider was honored with a special recognition at the Staff Excellence Awards on Tuesday. 

Also recognized was Rae Ann Franks, Academic Affairs senior secretary, as the 2022 Staff Member of the Year. Franks worked alongside Schneider in the dean’s office. 

“With the passing of a very close and dear colleague, she persevered and took on the additional workload and kept the dean’s office running efficiently,” Seachrist said in honoring Franks with the award. “Described as ‘the heart of our campus,’ she is always there, always ready to go the extra mile and to do so with grace and expertise. She is always available, dependable and conscientious.

“Her professionalism is obvious, but it’s her positivity, even during the most stressful times, that truly shines through.”

Nominators said Franks shows an extraordinarily strong commitment to the campus by working efficiently on course creation, student registration, as well as the paperwork required to hire a new full-time faculty member or adjunct.

Kelsey Kalgreen, a clinical mental health counselor, was named the 2022 Administrator of the Year. 

“Kelsey worked tirelessly during the pandemic to meet the needs of the people she serves, even in a remote environment,” said Seachrist in naming Kalgreen the year’s top administrator. “On several occasions, she would stay with a student in distress to make sure that student experiencing an emergency was attended to until they received the care they needed. And then, she would thoughtfully follow up, to make sure the student was continuing to receive the help they need.”
Nominators said Kalgreen is always thinking of ways to promote the services she provides, offering invaluable programs that promote mental health throughout the year.

“She exhibits a ‘can do’ work ethic, is dependable, conscientious and caring,” they wrote. “She gives 100% each and every day. She is an excellent listener, someone who is passionate about her job.”

This year’s Staff Excellence Selection Committee was led by 2021 Staff Excellence Award winners Rob Kairis and Mary Shank and included the following representatives: staff: Ellen Reber and Mike Shipe; administrators: Kaley Smitley-Harris, Ron Hoagland and Darcy McBride; faculty: Paul Bagavandos, Lindy Beckley, Amy Damrow, Cherie Mountain, Thomas Norton Smith, Carrie Schweitzer and Brad Shepherd.
 

Ren Camacho
Ren Camacho
Monday, April 25, 2022

Renato “Ren” Camacho, president and chief executive officer of the Akron-Canton Airport, will give the keynote address at Kent State University at Stark’s 2022 Commencement on May 13.

Local graduates are set to take Canton’s biggest stage during the commencement ceremony at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium.

Stark County’s only public university is honored to celebrate its newest graduates.

“We are the county’s Hometown University, and we are happy to commemorate the occasion in a special way — in a landmark that’s synonymous with our region,” said Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., Kent State Stark’s dean and chief administrative officer.

More than 100 graduates have confirmed their participation in the commencement ceremony, but several hundred degrees will be conferred this spring, consisting of associate and bachelor’s degrees. Across the university, the Kent State alumni family will grow by thousands as the university celebrates the accomplishments of its Spring Class of 2022.

COMMENCEMENT WEBSITE     CEREMONY LIVESTREAM

About Renato ‘Ren’ Camacho

A member of the Kent State Stark Advisory Board, Camacho has over 28 years of professional experience in the aviation and transportation engineering sectors, specializing in program management and customer service. He has implemented over $350 million of federally and locally funded projects for initiatives including: runway safety area improvements, master plans, lease negotiations with airlines, new business development initiatives and major airport infrastructure projects.

Camacho served as chief of planning and engineering with the City of Cleveland’s Department of Port Control, which oversees Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, Burke Lakefront Airport and the Lakefront Harbors. Prior to his Cleveland tenure, he spent 14 years with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, working in various capacities to complete major capital infrastructure projects including the World Trade Center site, George Washington Bridge, New York metro airports, Port Authority Bus Terminal and the Holland/Lincoln Tunnels. 

At Akron-Canton Airport, Camacho’s core responsibilities include leading a 50-member team of airport employees, strategic planning for the future of the airport, and directing all capital improvement programs. Specifically, he works to ensure the airport is a vital, economic engine that increases economic activity and pride to Northeast Ohio.

Camacho received his master’s degree in transportation planning and engineering from Polytechnic Institute of New York University and a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He serves on the Akron Summit Convention & Visitors Bureau Board of Directors, American Heart Association Stark County Executive Leadership Team, Aultman Health Foundation Board of Directors, Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, Greater Akron Chamber Board of Directors, Lake Township Board of Directors, Stark Economic Development Board of Directors, and Visit Canton Board of Directors.

He has also received the designation of Accredited Airport Executive from the American Association of Airport Executives. He is a licensed professional engineer in the state of Ohio and Professional Traffic Operations Engineer, plus has received numerous awards for his work in the civil engineering and transportation sectors.

Sarah Schmidt
Monday, April 25, 2022

Sarah Schmidt, assistant director of Global Education Initiatives at Kent State University at Stark, will be recognized at the 15th annual Twenty under 40! awards, produced by ystark!, a department of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, and The Repository.

Twenty under 40! awards recognize Stark County’s leaders under 40 who have demonstrated dynamic leadership and social responsibility. These individuals are committed to making a difference in the community and creating a lasting impact. 

Winners will be celebrated at a ceremony in June and recognized in The Repository’s ABOUT magazine June 2022 issue.

Schmidt oversees the Office of Global Education Initiatives at Kent State Stark, where she is responsible for advising international students and scholars, helping students interested in study abroad, and overseeing all education abroad initiatives and international partnerships.

As a liaison to the Office of Global Education at the Kent Campus, Schmidt works to connect domestic and international students with excellent services and support.

Schmidt began her work at Kent State Stark in 2015, after earning a master’s degree in Ethics, Peace and Global Affairs from American University in Washington, D.C. While in the nation’s capital, Schmidt served as American University’s program coordinator of the Mohammed Said Farsi Chair of Islamic Peace.

Mike Wheeler and Lindsay Zimmerman
Monday, April 25, 2022

Local philanthropist Lindsay Zimmerman and Michael Wheeler, president and chief legal officer of Patriot Software, were named Distinguished Alumni Award recipients at Kent State University at Stark’s recent 75th anniversary celebration.

“We are so proud of all that Lindsay and Mike have accomplished,” said Dean Denise A. Seachrist, Kent State Stark’s dean and chief administrative officer. “They exemplify the mission of our campus, which brings the power of Kent State University home to our local community. We provide the foundation for not only academic success, but for a successful future that is boundless.”

Lindsay Zimmerman

Lindsay Zimmerman is no stranger to giving back to the community, where she volunteers her time and her talent to making Canton and Stark County a wonderful place to call home. 

As founder of the Canton Heart Guild, she works to foster awareness of programs at the Canton Museum of Art, welcoming the younger generation and providing them with an opportunity to be involved as advocates of arts and culture in Stark County.

A Jackson High School graduate, Zimmerman chose to stay close to home for her first two years of college, attending our campus before finishing her degree at the Kent Campus in 2003.  There, she graduated with a bachelor’s degree in public relations.

Upon graduation, Zimmerman was hired at Aultman Hospital, where she worked in human resources, education and development and community relations. In 2011, she left Aultman to spend more time with her daughter, Stella, and pursue her passion as a volunteer in the community, fundraising for many local charities and organizations.

In addition to her work with the Canton Museum of Art, some of Zimmerman’s notable charitable and philanthropic roles include:  

  • As a member of the Women’s Board of Aultman Hospital, she has served as co-chair for the Angel Auction, its signature fundraising event, which has raised over $28 million to benefit life-changing medical care that has impacted patients, families and the entire community. 
  • Elevating the arts in Stark County, she serves on boards for the Patina Arts Center and the Canton Ballet, where she worked to establish its Red Velvet Party Fundraiser. She also has helped raise funds for Quest Recovery Services and the Stark County Library.
  • Zimmerman has also served: on the JRC Women in History Luncheon Committee and as a former Women in History Luncheon co-chair; as a member of the Artful Living Advisory Board; and she is a supporter of the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women.

Zimmerman and her husband, Brian, along with their daughter, reside in Jackson Township. 

Michael Wheeler

Michael Wheeler has become synonymous with Patriot Software Company, a local success that has reached the national stage.  But Wheeler also has walked the halls of his Hometown University, where he was a full-time CCP student during his senior year at Jackson High School.

A licensed attorney in the State of Ohio and a businessman at heart, Wheeler has an eye on helping the region whenever he can. This is a true hallmark of the county’s public university, which strives to lift local communities through a quality and affordable education. 

At Patriot Software, Wheeler is president and chief legal officer, also serving as president of the Board of Directors. He runs all operations and customer-facing experiences. He is in charge of all financial, legal, anti-fraud, banking, audit, insurance, and hiring. Patriot Software offers fully online payroll, accounting, time and attendance, and human resources support for American businesses and their accountants.

Some of Wheeler’s other notable successes include:

  • Closing a Series A strategic stock sale with RZC Investments, the investment arm for the Walton family in 2021.
  • Raising tens of millions of dollars through Private Stock Offerings to about 100 high net-worth investors — almost entirely here in the Stark County region.
  • In 2019, he managed every detail of the eight-figure sale of Top Echelon Software to private equity, overseeing the spin-off of FoxHire, LLC.  He also handled the donation of Career Marketplace, LLC, to a local nonprofit — keeping every single job right here in Stark County.

Wheeler also gives back to the community through his volunteer work. He is the youngest ever to serve as director on the board of the publicly traded Consumers National Bank of Minerva. 

He also has served on the boards of the Stark County YMCA, Canton Regional Chamber Education Committee, and the Stark County Library Foundation. He has volunteered extensively on missions across four continents, specifically working with orphanages, victims of human trafficking, and non-governmental organizations in Asia, Central America, and throughout Africa.

Wheeler comes back to campus frequently. He and his wife, Jo, and their three sons enjoy living at Lake Cable.

2022 Earth Day Celebration
Tuesday, April 19, 2022

Free, family friendly fun at Earth Day Celebration on Sunday, April 24, 2022.

Expect plenty of sunshine Sunday to celebrate our beautiful planet during Kent State University at Stark’s annual Earth Day Celebration on April 24.
 
The free, family friendly event on the campus, at 6000 Frank Ave. NW, is set to inspire environmental responsibility and to improve the apprecia­tion for our planet’s natural resources. The celebration will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Campus Center lot and the Pond and Wetlands Research Area.
 
Attendees will enjoy an afternoon filled with educational activities, entertainment and interactive demonstrations for all ages. The event, in its 12th year, also will include family favorites, such as nature walks, a scavenger hunt, games and crafts, mock fossil digs, photo opportunities, giveaways, the opportunity to recycle old electronics and much more.
 
Kent State Stark has partnered with the following sponsors to present Earth Day 2022: Brewer-Garrett, Earth Fare, Haymaker Tree & Lawn, Massillon Museum, Mr. Eric’s Music, Petitti Garden Centers and Stark Parks.
 
For more information on Kent State Stark’s Earth Day Celebration, a campus map and a complete list of participants, visit www.kent.edu/stark/earth-day-celebration.
 

Guitar Weekend 2022
Guitar Weekend 2022
Wednesday, April 13, 2022

Kent State University at Stark’s Guitar Weekend is a festival celebrating all styles of guitar playing.

This free event is open to guitar enthusiasts at any level. Join us for live performances by two exciting guitarists.

2022 GUITAR WEEKEND

APRIL 15-16, 2022
FINE ARTS BUILDING
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY AT STARK


SCHEDULE

Dan Wilson
Friday, April 15
7 p.m.
114 Fine Arts

McKinley High School & Kent State Stark Student Ensembles
Saturday, April 16
1 p.m.
114 Fine Arts

Neil Zaza
Saturday, April 16
7 p.m.
114 Fine Arts


FEATURED GUITARISTS
 

Dan WilsonDAN WILSON

Growing up in Akron, Ohio, Dan Wilson spent the majority of his youth within the church community, where his musical path began.

Traces of his major guitar influences – including Wes Montgomery, Charlie Christian, Joe Pass, and George Benson to name a few – can be discerned through his playing, but his musical identity has been shaped by everything from gospel and blues to traditional jazz, hip-hop and horn players like Sonny Rollins and Joe Henderson.

After graduating from Hiram College, Wilson made his recording debut with pianist Joe McBride and performed to worldwide acclaim with Joey DeFrancesco and Christian McBride’s Tip City, eventually recording his debut as a leader To Whom It May Concern.

Wilson has had the honor of sharing the stage with jazz greats including Eric Marienthal, Russell Malone, Les McCann, René Marie, Jeff Hamilton, David Sanborn and Dave Stryker. He also teaches jazz guitar and music theory through private lessons. 

Learn more about Dan Wilson.
 

Neil ZazaNEIL ZAZA

Not only has guitarist Neil Zaza helped to define the genre of melodic instrumental guitar, he has become a worldwide ambassador for the instrument itself. His melodic compositions have changed the way musicians play, and what audiences worldwide demand out of their guitar heroes.

With fiery technical brilliance and breathtaking musical interpretation, Neil Zaza has defined himself as the instrumental guitarist with an unparalleled ability to combine solid, catchy songwriting with a keen melodic sense and technical fury.

From his virtuoso rock solos, to laying a funk groove, to demonstrating his classical prowess by performing Bach and Mozart compositions, Zaza’s extreme versatility has been showcased worldwide in concerts, clinics, festivals, as well as on his own solo instrumental albums. Zaza has shared the bill with Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, Dweezil Zappa, Steve & Mike Porcaro (Toto), Yngwie Malmsteen, Vinnie Moore, and Andy Summers among countless others. He has performed on albums by Dweezil Zappa, Eric Carmen, Michael Stanley and also supplied guitar tracks for a Stewart Copeland-produced movie soundtrack.

Learn more about Neil Zaza.


CONTACT

Erin Vaughn, M.A.
Lecturer of Music
evaughn1@kent.edu
330-244-3361
121 Fine Arts

Once
Once
Thursday, March 24, 2022

Kent State University at Stark Theatre will hold its final theatrical production of the 2021-22 season with “Once", written by Enda Walsh and music and Lyrics by Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová.

The cast will take to the campus’ stage for opening night at 8 p.m. on Friday, April 8, in The Mary J. Timken Theatre, located in the Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. 

On the streets of Dublin, an Irish musician and a Czech immigrant are drawn together by their shared love of music. Over the course of one fateful week, an unexpected friendship and collaboration quickly evolves into a powerful but complicated love story, underscored by emotionally charged music.

Featuring all the magical songs from the critically acclaimed film, including the Oscar-winning "Falling Slowly," this achingly beautiful, joyously uplifting show strikes an unforgettable chord in audiences and speaks to the power of music to connect us all. A show like that only comes around Once.

"Once" is directed by Kent State Stark Theatre Director TC Mavis Jennings.

Performances will be held at 8 p.m. on April 8, 9, 15 and 16; and 2 p.m. on April 10 and 17.

Tickets for the show can be purchased online at www.kent.edu/stark/once, by phone at 330-244-3348 or in person at the box office in the Fine Arts Lobby. Will call opens one hour prior to performances. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for senior citizens and non-KSU students. Tickets are free to all Kent State students with current student IDs.  

Erin Brockovich Postponed
Erin Brockovich Postponed
Monday, March 14, 2022

Updated Tuesday, April 12 at 3:30 p.m.:

APRIL 13 LECTURE POSTPONED

Featured Speaker Erin Brockovich will not speak April 13 as previously scheduled at Kent State University at Stark. 

The consumer advocate and environmental activist canceled her presentation Tuesday after experiencing complications from an outpatient medical procedure, according to Dylan Kirkpatrick, an agent at All American Entertainment, who released the following statement:

“Unfortunately, Erin has experienced complications from this procedure and is unable to fly to Ohio for an event at Kent State that she was very much looking forward to. She is devastated to be missing the event and letting down the organizers who have worked so hard to pull the event together, as well as the students she was anxious to speak with. Once Erin is back on her feet, she hopes the event can be rescheduled.”   

The campus plans to reschedule the event for a future date, but details are unavailable at this time.


Tickets will be available Monday, March 28, for the final speaker in a notable lineup headlining the 30th season of Kent State University at Stark’s Featured Speakers Series.

Erin Brockovich, consumer advocate and environmental activist, will speak at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 13, at Kent State University at Stark. 

Beginning March 28, pick up tickets in the Office of Student Services, 132 Main Hall, during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday. 

The Featured Speakers Series is free and open to the public, but tickets are required and limited to two per person. 

Seating and tickets will be limited and ticket distribution is first-come, first-served. No phone or email reservations will be taken, nor will tickets be mailed. All tickets are general admission.

While it’s been over 20 years since Julia Roberts starred in the Oscar-winning film, “Erin Brockovich”, it turned an unknown legal researcher into a 20th century icon by showcasing how her dogged persistence was the impelling force behind the largest medical settlement lawsuit in history.

Today, Erin Brockovich is president of Brockovich Research & Consulting, and she is currently involved in numerous environmental projects worldwide. She has requests for her help in groundwater contamination complaints in every state within the country, Australia and other international hot spots. A best-selling author, Brockovich’s latest release, “Superman’s Not Coming: Our National Water Crisis and What We the People Can Do About It”, drew wide media attention before its publication.

Brockvich's lecture will be held in Timken Great Hall at the Kent State University at Stark Conference Center. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. 

For disability accommodations, please email starkcmc@kent.edu.

For more information about the series, visit www.kent.edu/stark/featured-speakers-series.
 

Wednesday, March 02, 2022

The Kent State Stark Women's History Committee will spotlight different, recognized women in fields like the arts, politics, science, sports and business every Wednesday in March on Kent State Stark's social media platforms.

 
Kamala Harris

She is the current Vice President of the United States of America. Harris is the daughter of immigrant parents. Her mother was a pioneer in her field as a breast cancer scientist and a great influence on her daughter. Previous to her vice presidency, Kamala Harris was elected as Senator for California, Attorney General of California, and San Francisco district attorney. She was the first woman, first black, and first south Asian elected as attorney general in California, and the first Indian senator. Her parents were activists that instilled in her the desire to be involved in social justice. One of her signature accomplishments as California Attorney General was the creation of an online platform making criminal justice data available to the public, improving police accountability. As a senator, she worked on issues such as securing elections, hunger, maternal health care, and climate. Vice President Harris is the first woman, the first Black American, and the first South Asian American Vice President in US history.


Billie Jean King

A famous American tennis player most known for her victory over Bobby Riggs in the Battle of the sexes in 1973 (6-4, 6-3, 6-3). King is a tireless advocate for opportunities and equity for women in sports. She testified before Congress on the need for Title IX which is celebrating its 50th anniversary since its passage in 1972. King created the Women’s Sports Foundation in 1974 to help promote and support women’s participation in all sports. She worked with eight other women to establish World Team Tennis in 1974, creating the only co-ed professional sports league at the time. In 2009 King received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama for her tireless work on behalf of women and LGBTQ athletes. She added to her efforts in 2014 with the Billie Jean King Leadership Initiative to continue the fight for women’s opportunities. 


Jane Keckler

Jane Keckler was the first women library director at the Kent State Stark Campus Library. Jane graduated from Hiram College with a B.S. in Chemistry and received her Masters of Library Science from Western Reserve University.  She was named Stark Campus Library Director in 1968 and served 22 years until her retirement in 1990.  

In her role as Library Director, Jane was instrumental in transforming the library from a small space located in Main Hall to its current location with the construction of the impressive Learning Resource Center.   Her influence and vision can be seen in the design of the library. Montage, the student newspaper at the time, reported that she had researched and planned the new library for three years.  At the time of its construction the library was state-of-the-art, with the most modern facilities and equipment.  In another Montage article, Jane stated the library will “have esthetic appeal and will make the Stark LRC one of the more attractive libraries in the state.” Jane passed away in 2016 and in her estate she generously left a monetary gift to the library.  In her honor, the Director’s Conference Room is named after her.  Jane’s legacy lives on today in the library’s comprehensive services and the beautiful spaces she helped create.


Betty White

Betty White (her real name) was an American actress and comedian whose career in the entertainment industry spanned over 70 years. During World War II, to assist in the war effort, she volunteered with the American Women’s Volunteer Services by helping move war supplies in California and participating in events for troops before they were deployed. After the war she got her first radio show in 1949 – “The Betty White Show”. In 1952 Betty moved to television with an unscripted show that was five and a half hours long – six days a week! And she was the first women to work on both sides of the camera. Also, in 1952 she founded the Banoy Productions with writer George Tibbles and Don Fedderson, a producer. In 1959 she made her theatrical debut in “Third Best Sport”.

Her career included:

  • In the 1960’s she was offered but decided an anchor position at N.B.C. (the job was filled by Barbara Walters)
  • In the 1970’s she starred in the “Mary Tyler Moore Show” and “The Betty White Show”
  • In the 1980’s she was in “Mama’s Family” and “Golden Girls”

Betty starred in a movie “The Proposal” in 2009, hosted a “Saturday Night Live” television show and won a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by Female Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. During her career she received 8 Emmy Awards in 3 categories, a Grammy Award and 3 Screen Actors Guild Awards. Betty has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. She is the Author of 5 books. In 1963 Betty Married the love of her life Allen Ludden, who died in 1981. When asked why she didn’t remarry she said, “when you have had the best, who needs the rest?” But most of all we will remember Betty White for making us laugh, helping us enjoy the moment.


Indra Nooyi 

Indra Nooyi is the former CEO PepsiCo. She is the first immigrant women of color to lead a Fortune 50 company. As CEO, Indra transformed PepsiCo with the “Performance with Purpose” mission of making healthier products in environmentally sustainable ways. She immigrated from India to the US to study a Master’s degree in Public and Private Management at Yale university. She worked at PepsiCo for 24 year, 12 of which she was the CEO of company. Under her leadership, PepsiCo’s grew 80 percent. When Indra began working at PepsiCo in 1994, there were no women CEO’s in the Fortune 500 companies, today in 2022 there are only 41 women. Indra is known for her candid discussions about the challenges women face to reach senior leadership positions in the corporate world.

The Fish Must Die
The Fish Must Die
Friday, February 04, 2022

Kent State University at Stark Theatre will hold its second theatrical production of the 2021-22 season, “The Fish Must Die", by Raymond King Shurtz.

The cast will take to the campus’ stage for opening night at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 10, in The Mary J. Timken Theatre, located in the Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. 

Directed by Kent State Stark Theatre Director TC Mavis Jennings, "The Fish Must Die" is a hilarious and heart-warming story about a group of theatre makers putting on a play titled "The Fish Must Die." Where the audience is invited to the show behind the show. Where backstage contains a lion's share of the conflict, the drama and the farce which makes each character an important part of the theatre-making puzzle. Come to laugh, come to roll your eyes, but also come to learn that everyone is part of the show, including you.

Performances, for one weekend only, will be held at 8 p.m. on Feb. 10, 11 and 12 and at 2 p.m. on Feb. 13.

Tickets for the show can be purchased online at www.kent.edu/stark/the-fish-must-die, by phone at 330-244-3348 or in person at the box office in the Fine Arts Lobby. Will call opens one hour prior to performances. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for senior citizens and non-KSU students. Tickets are free to all Kent State students with current student IDs.  

Kent State Stark Fall 2021 President's & Dean's List
Kent State Stark Fall 2021 President's & Dean's List
Monday, January 31, 2022

Kent State University at Stark has announced its President's and Dean’s List for the fall 2021 semester. 

Requirements for the President’s List include a 4.00 grade point and at least 15 letter-graded credit hours completed by the end of the semester.

Dean’s List criteria are a 3.40 grade point average or above for the fall 2021 semester and at least 12 letter-graded (A, B, etc.) credit hours completed by the end of the semester.
 

FALL 2021 PRESIDENT'S LIST

The following students have been named to the Kent State University President’s List. 

Jay Aaron
Destini Adorisio
Amanda Baxter
Kamri Beard
Madison Behon
Joshua Boley
Hunter Bradley
Nathan Cutting
Abigail Dimengo
Joshua Dunn
Daniel Earley
Kailyn Elliott
Sean Gayler
Alyssa Gelet
Gannon George
Robyn Green
Mary Hammel
Imari Hill
Tanner Immel
Chase Jeffries
Hanna Jones
Adam Kollay
Katelyn Konetsky
Sophie Konstantacos
Kellie R. Kordinak
Madeline Kurtz
Payton Lutz
Megan Majirsky
Lucas Marusiak
Jessica Mathews
Jennifer May
Kaleb Miller
Nathaniel Miller
Allison Murphy
Olivia Nagy
Susan Nason
Cassandra Painley
Kara Parsons
Connor Pearsall
Zeke Robertson
Patiance Sloan
Leah Snow
Robin Storad
Delaney Streby
Benjamin Swartz
Madison Swartzentruber
Ana Tahir
Camille Tenney
Natalie Thouvenin
Jadon Tinnon
Austin Vandegrift
Kayla VanKirk
Brayden Wikoff
Kaela Woost
Esaias Wright


FALL 2021 DEAN'S LIST

The following students have been named to the Kent State Stark Dean's List:

Alexandra Abood
Eden Alexander
Haleigh Alexander
Brianna Allen
Brittany Alterio
Sarah Amatangelo
Karilyn Arnold
Olivia Ash
Rachel Ashmore
Rachel Bachman
Alyssa Baker
Cameron Balca
Seth Baldwin
Alex Ball
Evan Balla
Samantha Baranek
John Barnett
Jacob Barton
Ryan Bass
Elaine Bast
Macy Battershell
Alexa Battista
Samantha Battista
Mason Batty
Dina Beachy
Madison Beadling
Alanna Beadnell
Rachel Beam
Brandon Beavers
Cody Bennett
Tanner Berg
Emily Bernstein
Arianna Berry
Robert Bever
Emma Bezek
Kylie Birchfield
Brandy Bishop
Nathan Blough
Jacqueline Blythe
Sarah Boda
Joshua Boggs
Mackayli Bolyard-Pizana
Juliana Borsellino
Grace Boswell
Joseph Boughton
Makayla Bowe
Rachel Bowe
LaKaleb Bowen
Maxx Bowman
Jenna Boyd
Jessica Bracken
Katie Brady
Kinslee Brasill
Nicholas Brewster
Collin Brink
Spencer Brown
John Browning
Kellie Broz
Thomas Bullock
Tyler Bulone
Elizabeth Burleson
Ashlee Burns
Crystal Byler
Gregory Cain
Christel Campbell
William Caracanas
Oneal Cardinal
Christian Carmichael
Lauren Carpenter
Brandi Carter
Madisyn Carter
Clay Casper
Morgan Casper
Pablo Castillo Gomez
Deanna Chatman
Harlee Christner
Allyson Clapp
Amanda Clark
Anna Clark
Hannah Clark
Makayla Clos
Colton Cochran
Joshua Cole
Peyton Comer
Darius Cone
Olivia Conrad
Chloe Cook
Bradley Cottrill
Erica Cox
Sean Craney
Brayden Crites
Josiah Crock
Olivia Crone
Devon Crooks
Isabelle Cullen
Molly Cunningham
Britney Cupery
Nicole Cvammen
Allie D’Entremont
Valerie Dalrymple
Steven Danko
Adam Davis
Trever Davis
Lily Dear
Jenna Del Valle
Maya Demchak
Desiree’ DeMeo
Isabella DePasquale
Dale Dickson
Arabella Dillard
Donathan Dillard
Madison Dine
Natalie DiRuzza
Nathan Dugan
Morgen Durant
McKenzie Ecrement
Katherine Edwards
Jared Eichelberger
Jeniv Elayan
Theodore ElFaye
Elijah Eller
Madeleine Ellsworth
Tyler Ely
Brittany Emert
Ben Etheridge
Gabrielle Evans
Patrick Faunce
Brandon Fee
Erin Fenk
Cole Ferguson
Grace Film
Brandon Finch
Anthony Fiorille
Tristan Ford
Madison Foutz
Sarah Fowler
Emma Francis
Alyssa Frease
Claire Fuller
Joseph Fuller
Dillon Fulton
Tessa Fusko
Josiah Gaines
Alexis Garrett
Grace Garritano
Rachel Garritano
Kat Gaynesbloom
Samuel Gentile
Autumn George
Dakota Gordon
William Govan
Benjamin Graber
Kailey Gray
MaKenzie Green
Catherine Gresser
Adam Gross
Thomas Gross
Benjamin Grossman
Jagr Groubert
Daniel Groves
Maria Gutierrez Davila
Casey Ha
Caden Haines
Emma Halvorson
John Hancock
Jeremiah Harbour
Kayla Harland
Kelly Harter
Brianna Hastings
Claire Haswell
Chelsea Hatfield
Jacob Hausch
Briana Hawkins
Kaitlyn Hays
Nicholas Hearn
Destiny Henson
Jacob Hershberger
Raini Hershey
Hannah Hill
Mercedes Hill
Natania Hinchliffe
Wyatt Hines
Jennifer Hinton
Emily Hitchings
Christopher Hodson
Alexis Hogsed
Lana Hollis
Nicholas Hoover
Carrigan Horning
Anne Hornyak
Kaylee Hoyt
Danielle Hunter
Mariah Hupp
Alexis Hymes
Sarah Iden
Muhammed Ismail
Meaghan James
Kennedy Javins
Alec Johnson
Eric Johnson
Lauren Johnson
Paige Johnson
Rae Judy
Alexandra Kapper
Mary Karcher
Cate Katigbak
Zach Kauffman
Abbey Keller
Dylan Kelsey
Shannon Kendrick
Hanzala Khalid
Sarah Khatoon
Joshua Kirsch
Reilly Kline
Daniel Klotz
Taylor Klusti-Palmer
Samuel Knotts
Donovan Koman
Selena Konjovic
Jackie Koren
Annabella Kovach
Caleb Kovach
Kylie Kovatch
Gavin Krall
Megan Lamm
Ali Lancaster
Emerson Lancaster
Julian Larew
Emma Lawrence
Kaitlyn Leasure
Chad Leatherberry
Anthony Leighton
Jeffry Lengel
Ashley Leveto-Dean
Rebecca Leyman
Kathryn Lilly
Halie Lindemann
Alex Lindesmith
Julia Lockwood
Anthony Logan
Mercedes Lombardi
Trinidy Longgood
Mason Love
Grace Lucarelli
Robert Lucas
Stone Lucas
Madalyne Ludovici
Brycen Ludwig
Alexis Maffei
Dana Magella
Kayla Maloof
Sarah Maranville
Christopher Marcic
Mattie Marsilio
Samuel Marstrell
Jason Martin
Phillip Martin
Megan Matyas
Daniel Maurer
Tessa Maurer
Tejasvini Mavuleti
Lauren May
Ryan Mazanec
Dylan Mazon
Elaina Mazzocca
Ethan McAbee
Alyssa McCarthy
Adam McCloskey
Zoey McCulloch
DeSean McElroy
Branden Mckee
Makaya McKnight
Jennifer Mellinger
Lauren Meredith
Dominic Merlitti
Makell Merrick
Aleah Mesaros
Thomas Meyers
Joseph Miller
Katherine Miller
Max Miller
Lane Mitchell
Katelyn Mizener
Travis Moldovan
Hannah Moledor
Haley Monroe
Madison Moore
Micaelah Morgan Abdul-Ali
Emma Mori
Jessica Morton
Wyatt Moss
Isabellia Moyers
Sherilynn Mullett
Nadia Muqaddam
Jonathan Mustard
Danielle Myers
Elizabeth Narris
Joshua Nason
Madison Naugle
Malcolm Neitenbach
Shaker Neupane
Michelle Nicholas
Kaitlyn Nicholson
Angelia Nicolardi
Brianna Nutter
Trevor Nutter
Taylor O’Lear
Elaina Oberdorfer
Samantha Ogg
Dylan Ohm
Hunter Ohm
John Ohman
Jamesha Oliver
Emma Ondrus
Chloe Orin
Alexis Ortman
Luke Overmire
Alyssa Owens
Sarah Ozimec
Logan Palmer
Brittany Parker
Jamie Parker
Michaela Patterson
Tara Pedigo
Dominic Perozzi
Taylor Perry
Madison Petersen
Ashley Peveich
Alysha Pfister
Tegan Phillips
Matt Plucinski
Jessica Poling
Alexander Posten
Mckenzie Posten
Carrie Powell
Chloe Powell
Brooke Provance
Katie Pudloski
Riley Pullen
Brittany Quellhorst
Daniel Rader
Miranda Rambaud
Alexandros Ramos
Miranda Rasicci
Alia Ray
Desiree Reed
Luke Rhodes
Alex Richards
Emily Rider
Charleigh Riffle
Liam Roach
Renee Robinette
Kassandra Rogers
Dannylle Rohr
Lauren Rohr
Madison Roman
Lilyan Ronske
Miranda Rosato
Savanna Rosato
Alexandra Rossi
Brittany Roush
Winnie Russ
Navdeep Sadhra
ElizaBeth Sanders
Ashish Sangar
Thomas Sarver
Madison Schaber
Alexander Schlabach
Maxwell Schlabach
Evan Schonauer
Amber Schumacher
Benjamin Seaman
Faith Seders
Jacob Seffern
Jarrod Seink
Spencer Selman
Brian Selvey
Hailey Senderak
Aaron Shaffer
Madison Shaw
Madison Shisler
Jack Shoup
Alyssa Sines
Taylor Slone
Bradley Smith
Chelsea Smith
Julia Smith
Natalie Smith
Samantha Soisson
Maranda Solomon
Elizabeth Sowa
Nick Stafford
Mariah Stanish
Jenna Stanley
Maria Steve
Ace Stewart
Jessica Stewart
Shelbee Stidom
Alyssa Storz
Riley Sullivan
Elaina Swigert
Kyle Swym
Rhea Szabo
Faith Taylor
Joe Tayse
Cameron Telesz
Olivia Terranova
Jacob Thomas
Alex Thompson
Dyllon P. Thompson
Daniell Thornton
MaKenzie Thrasher
Zlata Todaro
Ethan Tonkel
Kaitlyn Troyer
Steven Turik
Taylor Ulichney
Alison Ullom
Lana Ulrich
Krista Vallant
Jaban VanKirk
Darren Vanyo
Adam Varlamos
Sam Verble
Brent Vigil
Sanjana Vivekanandan
Aidan Wade
Kurt Wagner
Paul Wagner
Kaitlyn Wallace
Hannah Wallis
Sharon Walsh
Tatum Walulik
Joshua Warren
Autumn Wassam
Hailey Weaver
Hayden Weaver
Olivia Weaver
Jakob Webb
Sarah Weinstock
Trevor Weiss
Andrew Weissert
Mady R.Wendell
Sarah Wickstrom
Malori Wike
Beau Wilkinson
Jason Williams
Lindsay Williams
Ashley Wise
Katherine Wise
Bailey Witwer
Cassandra Wolfe
Joanie Wood
Kenneth Woodring
Casey Worges
James Yatson
Logan Yerrick
EMI Zehner
Joseph Zeitler
Griffen Zemrock
Alexa Ziler
Gabrielle Zitek
Spencer Zolla

Elizabeth Smart tickets sold out
Featured Speaker Elizabeth Smart
Saturday, January 29, 2022

Updated Wednesday, Feb. 15:

SOLD OUT -  NO TICKETS REMAIN 


Tickets will be available Monday, Feb. 7, for the second speaker in a notable lineup headlining the 30th season of Kent State University at Stark’s Featured Speakers Series.

Elizabeth Smart, child abduction survivor and present-day advocate, will speak at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 23, at Kent State University at Stark. 

Tickets for Smart’s presentation will be available beginning Monday, Feb. 7.

Pick up tickets in the Office of Student Services, 132 Main Hall, during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday. 

The Featured Speakers Series is free and open to the public, but tickets are required and limited to two per person. 

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, seating and tickets will be limited and ticket distribution is first-come, first-served. No phone or email reservations will be taken, nor will tickets be mailed. All tickets are general admission.

The abduction of Elizabeth Smart was one of the most followed child abduction cases of our time. Abducted in 2002, Smart’s captors controlled her by threatening to kill her and her family if she tried to escape. Police safely reunited Smart with her family nine months later.

Through this traumatic experience, Smart has become an advocate for change related to child abduction, recovery programs and national legislation. The founder of the Elizabeth Smart Foundation, Smart has helped promote The National AMBER Alert, The Adam Walsh Child Protection & Safety Act and other safety legislation. She also has chronicled her experiences in the New York Times best-selling book, “My Story” and has recently released a new book about reclaiming one’s life, “Where There’s Hope”.

Following Smart on Feb. 23, the Featured Speakers Series will wrap up its 30th season with Erin Brockovich, the brash legal clerk turned environmental powerhouse, on April 13.

Lectures are held in Timken Great Hall at the Kent State University at Stark Conference Center. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. Face coverings are required at all times while in the building.

For disability accommodations, please email starkcmc@kent.edu.

For more information about the series, visit www.kent.edu/stark/featured-speakers-series.
 

2022 Scholastic Art Exhibition
2022 Scholastic Art Exhibition
Wednesday, January 19, 2022

Kent State University at Stark is host to the 2022 Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Exhibit and Awards Ceremony.

The exhibition features artwork from middle and high school students, representing districts in Stark, Summit, Portage, Wayne, Tuscarawas and Medina counties.

Kent State Stark is impressed by the talent of the students who submitted their artwork. Stop by to view an impressive exhibition of Gold and Silver key winners.

EXHIBIT HOURS:

Jan. 19 - 21
Wednesday - Thursday: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.  
Closed Saturday & Sunday

Jan. 24 - 29
Monday - Thursday: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Saturday: 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

EXHIBIT LOCATION:

Kent State Stark Fine Arts Building
- The William J. and Pearl F. Lemmon Visiting Artist Gallery
- MJ and Pat Albacete Student Art Gallery
 

Learn more about the Scholastic Art Awards & Exhibition at Kent State Stark.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Celebration
Sunday, January 16, 2022

Kent State University will be closed Monday, Jan. 17, in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

  • There will be no classes, and offices will be closed.
  • The university will reopen on Tuesday, Jan. 18.

 

Happy Holidays from Kent State Stark
Happy Holidays from Kent State Stark
Wednesday, December 22, 2021

Happy Holidays from Kent State University at Stark!

Kent State Stark will be closed for winter break Thursday, Dec. 23, 2021, through Sunday, Jan. 2, 2022. All buildings and offices will be closed during this time. Offices will reopen on Monday, Jan. 3, 2022.

Everyone at Kent State Stark wishes you a joyous and healthy holiday season.

Rwanda Delegation visits the Pro Football Hall of Fame
Wednesday, November 24, 2021

This story was published in The Repository on Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2021. Written by Sam Zern.

 
Rwanda DelegationKent State University and the University of Rwanda have a new partnership that administrators say is connecting students, faculty and research across oceans.

Leaders from the University of Rwanda spent last week in Northeast Ohio for a series of in-person meetings with leaders from Kent State's Stark Campus to finalize details on a new partnership that will eventually bring joint classes, international exchanges and research across multiple disciplines.

"This is envisioned to become a very deep partnership with lots of different layers to it," said Sarah Schmidt, assistant director of Global Education Initiatives at Kent State University at Stark.

"We have the institutional level, and we have formalized the partnership with University of Rwanda, but there will be various collaborations within that partnership so curricular innovations and collaborations, potentially even joint degree programs at a certain point."

How Kent State University is partnering with University of Rwanda

The schools will offer studies in undergraduate and graduate areas, particularly in aerospace engineering, education and conflict management.

The University of Rwanda will begin receiving study abroad students from Kent State this summer, and the universities plan to have a joint research conference in 2023, focusing on conflict management.

As early as the spring semester, Schmidt is looking to teach a joint course in peace education alongside a professor at the University of Rwanda, with students from both universities learning together in a virtual classroom.

Both universities have their own schools examining peace and conflict: Kent State's was created following the 1970 Ohio National Guard shootings of Kent students protesting the Vietnam War, while the University of Rwanda's evolved in the aftermath of the 1994 genocide and civil war in the country.

Those shared tragedies have given both schools a mission toward understanding conflict and peace.

"The two centers are willing to cooperate so to cross-fertilize each other and share experiences, work together, research approaches and methodology to prevent conflicts in our respective communities," said Alexandre Lyambabaje, vice chancellor of the University of Rwanda.

Lyambabaje said the partnership has been in the works since 2018. Even though the pandemic made some of the international travel between the schools difficult, the resulting program speaks to the willingness from both schools to partner and cooperate on their shared values, he said.

Pacifique Niyonzima, a graduate assistant at Kent State University who is from Kigali, Rwanda, has been pushing the two schools to work together since he interned with the University of Rwanda in 2018. He and Schmidt took a group of Kent State students to Rwanda during spring break in 2019 for a class on conflict management and to further the relationship between the schools.

"I've been focused on higher education and internationalization, so I'm so very happy to see that this initiative is coming together," Niyonzima said. "Now the rest is implementing actions."

University of Rwanda team visits the Pro Football Hall of Fame

Part of the benefit of the partnership, administrators say, is the chance for cross cultural experiences.

When the Kent State team traveled to Rwanda, they toured museums and visited a safari. For the University of Rwanda team, that meant visiting Canton’s Pro Football Hall of Fame.

"Dean [Denise] Seachrist called me and said that she was looking for something uniquely American, and I think we managed to find something that is uniquely American," said Rich Desrosiers, chief communications officer at the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

"Even though many of the particulars about American football were new and unusual to the guests, I still think they managed to capture something that's important to us at the Hall of Fame, which is that the game of football is more than the sport itself, it's about the camaraderie that's built, the team aspect of the game."

Reach Sam Zern at szern@cantonrep.com or 330-580-8322. Or Twitter: @sam_zern

VIEW KENT STATE STARK PHOTOS

Geodes
Geodes
Friday, November 19, 2021

Geodes

Students in the Stark Geology club, GEODES, recently made a 20-minute video presentation about rocks for the 3rd-grade classes at Judith Resnick CLC of Akron Public Schools. The teachers showed the video and then the students did a live Question and Answer session over Zoom with the class. The 3rd graders loved the video and asked excellent questions. The teachers want this to be a yearly experience. 

Stark Campus Geodes students; pictured from left to right: Jeremy Salvo, Sebastian Constable, Casey Worges, Ryan Codispoti, Maxwell "T. Rex" Purses, April Hazaimeh, and Kerry Coss.

To learn more about the Geology program at Kent State Stark, contact Dr. Carrie Schweitzer at cschweit@kent.edu or visit www.kent.edu/stark/geology.

Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Wednesday, November 03, 2021

Kent State University at Stark Theatre will hold its first theatrical production of the 2021-22 season, “Hedwig and the Angry Inch", by John Cameron Mitchell and music and lyrics by Stephen Trask.

The cast will take to the campus’ stage for opening night at 8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 12, in The Mary J. Timken Theatre, located in the Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. 

Directed by Kent State Stark Theatre Director TC Mavis Jennings, "Hedwig and the Angry Inch" tells the story of the “internationally ignored song stylist” Hedwig Schmidt, a fourth wall smashing East German rock ‘n’ roll goddess who also happens to be the victim of a botched sex-change operation. Hedwig is backed up by Yitzhak and the hard-rock band “The Angry Inch.” Hedwig transforms in this rock and roll tale by rising above the abuse, deceit and abandonment they have been carrying for many years. As Hedwig steps forward, courageously into the unknown, Yitzhak takes their rightful place as the shining star of rock and roll on the midnight radio.

Performances will be held at 8 p.m. on Nov. 12, 13, 19 and 20, and at 2 p.m. on Nov. 14 and 21.

Tickets for the show can be purchased online at www.kent.edu/stark/theatre, by phone at 330-244-3348 or in person at the box office in the Fine Arts Lobby. Will call opens one hour prior to performances. Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for senior citizens and non-KSU students. Tickets are free to all Kent State students with current student IDs.  
 

Help Students when Tragedy Strikes: Give to the Emergency Relief Fund this Giving Tuesday
Tuesday, November 02, 2021

A full tank of gas, groceries in the fridge and a mattress to sleep on might seem like simple things, but for some students it can make the biggest difference in their world. For senior psychology major Natalie James, a gas card meant she was no longer running on empty in more ways than one. 

Last year, this professionally trained opera singer found herself far from her former role as a Disney princess. Without a bed, without food, but she was not without a chance. She would get her Cinderella story. 

“I was at a really low point in my life,” explained James, recalling her first meeting with Rev. Ryan Johanning of Interfaith Campus Ministry, which provides emergency assistance, referral and support to students. “When (Johanning) handed me the gas card, I was just so shocked. Is that for me to take? And then, I found out there was even more help for me, support I would have only dreamed about.”

But this aid wasn’t the kind that only exists in fairytales. Thanks to generous donors, everyday necessities become a reality for students who may be struggling. During this year’s Giving Tuesday campaign, there are even more ways to donate. A newly established Emergency Relief Fund will help Kent State University at Stark students when the unthinkable happens. 

This new fund provides aid during a true emergency — right when tragedy strikes. Some Kent State Stark students have battled cancer, survived domestic violence and even a house fire that destroyed all their possessions. Still others have juggled schoolwork while caring for a child born with birth defects.

For James, life’s unexpected challenges began when she found herself staying on friends’ couches, without a mattress and a home to call her own. When she suffered a vocal cord injury, spurred by issues with her spine, this musical talent found herself unable to speak, let alone continue her voice lessons at Kent State University at Stark.  

“I told my instructor I didn’t have a bed to sleep on. I was dirt broke at the time. I didn’t have groceries — or anything,” James said. “Right away, she connected me with Interfaith.” 

This 22-year-old, who had previously served as a food pantry coordinator providing meals for more than 15,000, was now in need herself. She received groceries from Flash’s Food Pantry and that helped her keep going. James said she’s always had “a special place in my heart for feeding those in need” and now that she’s walked in their shoes, that connection is even greater. 

“I know a lot of students are in dark, heavy places right now,” she said. “And I was embarrassed that I was in this place because we never think we will end up there, needing help, with so little to our name. But I am here to tell you, there is hope. It doesn’t have to be a big ordeal to get help; it can be a positive thing.”

Through enduring this trial, James said she has learned more about the power of being associated with Kent State University. 

“As a student, I was provided with so many resources, and it helped to have someone to guide me through the process,” she said. “There were times when I was struggling so much that I didn’t even know if it was realistic to continue my education. Am I making the right decision? Can I pull this off?

“But I learned that because I am a Kent State student, I have more security. I can still get groceries and the help that I need to get back on my feet. If I would have dropped out, I wouldn’t have those supports.

“Kent State is here to help you and assist you in your life — not just in your studies.”

For this Canton native, who has discovered a passion outside of singing — academic research — she has big plans on and off the stage. That includes pursuing a master’s degree in consumer psychology after graduating from Kent State Stark. 

“The experience I went through, well, people who don’t go through those experiences don’t always feel inclined to give. They don’t always feel inclined to help,” James said. “But when you truly realize your gift is helping others to pursue their dreams, it is giving them a chance they didn’t even know existed, and this is what creates real joy that’s sustainable.”

It not only can make the biggest difference in someone’s world, but it can move them from setback to breakthrough — and get a real chance at happily ever after.  

Our students need your support today. Give to the Emergency Relief Fund this Giving Tuesday and you will be helping students, just like Natalie James, when the unthinkable happens.

SUPPORT THE EMERGENCY RELIEF FUND
 

Kent State Stark Distinguished Teaching Award
Kent State Stark Distinguished Teaching Award
Monday, November 01, 2021

Outstanding professors have comprehensive knowledge of their fields, effectively and resourcefully organize and present material, and stimulate student thinking and understanding.

Students, alumni, faculty and staff are invited to submit nominations for such an outstanding professor at Kent State Stark.

Based on your nominations, a member of the full-time faculty will be awarded the Distinguished Teaching Award, and an adjunct (part-time) faculty member will be the recipient of the Award of Distinction.

Award recipients will be announced in May. A selection committee consisting of Kent State Stark faculty and students will choose the recipients. 

The following criteria is used in the selection process:

  • Comprehensive knowledge of his or her field
  • Effectiveness in organizing and presenting material
  • Ability to stimulate thinking and develop understanding in students
  • Ability to arouse student interest
  • Demonstrated resourcefulness

These awards are not popularity contests. Simply submitting a faculty member's name is not enough. Only those nominations which thoroughly describe why the faculty member is outstanding (50 word minimum) will be forwarded to the selection committee.

Deadline to submit nominationsSunday, Dec. 19, 2021, at 11:59 p.m.

SUBMIT NOMINATION


Questions about the 2021-22 nomination process can be directed to:

Professor Mason Shuman
Associate Lecturer of Spanish
Selection Committee Chair
mshuman1@kent.edu

Learn more about the Distinguished Teaching Award and Award of Distinction at Kent State Stark.
 

Alumni Association 2021 Distinguished Teaching Award
Alumni Association 2021 Distinguished Teaching Award
Friday, October 22, 2021

The 2021 Distinguished Teaching Award (DTA) recipients are an outstanding group of teachers who are truly dedicated to their students' success. Sponsored by the Kent State Alumni Association, the DTA is a highly prestigious honor in teaching. The award is presented annually to three full-time faculty members who demonstrate extraordinary teaching, whether it be in the classroom or online.

Two Stark Campus faculty members were named as this year's recipients and one Stark Campus faculty member was a finalist.

Congratulations to this year's recipients:

Katrina R. Bloch, Ph.D., Sociology, Stark Campus

Katrina R. Bloch, Ph.D., strives to help her students adopt a sociological lens. She believes that students who view themselves as part of a social system and active social agents within it also gain an appreciation for the importance of sociology as a discipline. Her open and honest classroom environment encourages students to reach their fullest potential in her courses and beyond.  

She also provides students with experiential learning opportunities as a tool to connect research and theory to students’ lives. While she has worked to continuously improve her pedagogy throughout her career, she credits her students’ role in that process too. Dr. Bloch said, “My students rise to the occasion and push me to always improve and do better.”

 

Julie K. Cremeans-Smith, Ph.D., Psychology, Stark Campus

Julie K. Cremeans-Smith, Ph.D., not only challenges her students to understand mental health struggles and conditions, but to understand, and even adopt, strategies for successful coping and resilience. Her classroom carries a culture of care and concern, where everyone is capable of success. The engaging and inspiring nature of her teaching style leads many students to pursue additional psychology courses. 

She frequently asks students to reflect on their lived experiences, analyzing them through the lens of course materials. Both in and out of the classroom, Dr. Cremeans-Smith connects students with resources regarding career pathways and research opportunities. She explained, “I devote myself to mentoring undergraduate students in research; I believe quite strongly in the value of research experiences for students.”

 

Donna Lee, DMA, Music, Kent Campus

Donna Lee, DMA, has been teaching piano at Kent State University for 22 years. She not only prepares her students to fulfill their curricular requirements in piano performance, but to understand the high level of dedication and work it takes to make a piece performance worthy through technical command, structural awareness, stylistic understanding and artistic expression. 

She leads by example, performing on and off campus frequently to provide opportunities for students to see her polished programs. Her passion for music is evident to her students and anyone else who has heard her play. Dr. Lee shared, “I recognize the awe-inspiring power that music can have; the means it holds to trigger an emotion, a memory or an experience in an unsuspecting listener.” 

 

Through hard work, dedication and inspiration to their students, these professors join more than 150 teachers who have received the DTA since its inception in 1967. They were honored alongside the 2021 DTA finalists and other outstanding Kent State faculty at the University Teaching Council Conference on Oct. 22, 2021.


Congratulations to the 2021 DTA Finalists:

  • Jeffrey T. Child, Ph.D., Communication Studies, Kent Campus
  • Bradley S. Keefer, Ph.D., History, Ashtabula Campus
  • Jeffrey A. Osikiewicz, Ph.D., Mathematical Sciences, Tuscarawas Campus
  • Mark K. Schatz, Art, Kent Campus
  • Gregory A. Smith, Ph.D., Biological Sciences, Stark Campus
  • Gregory S. Stroh, Architecture Program, Kent Campus
  • Donald L. White, Ph.D., Mathematical Sciences, Kent Campus
Featured Speaker Maxwell King
Featured Speaker Maxwell King
Tuesday, October 12, 2021

Tickets will be available Monday, Oct. 18 for the first speaker in a notable lineup headlining the 30th season of Kent State University at Stark’s Featured Speakers Series.

Maxwell King, author of the first full-length biography of Fred Rogers, “The Good Neighbor: The Life and Work of Fred Rogers”, will speak at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 9, at Kent State University at Stark. 

Tickets for King’s presentation will be available beginning Monday, Oct. 18,

Pick up tickets in the Office of Student Services, 132 Main Hall, during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday. A limited number of tickets can be reserved online.

GET TICKETS
The Featured Speakers Series is free and open to the public, but tickets are required and limited to two per person. 

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, seating and tickets will be limited and ticket distribution is first-come, first-served. No phone or email reservations will be taken, nor will tickets be mailed. All tickets are general admission.

Along with writing the biography of “Mister Rogers”, King is a former editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer and director of the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media. His four-decade career also includes presidencies at two of the country’s largest philanthropies: The Pittsburgh Foundation and Heinz Endowments. 

Following King on Nov. 9, the Featured Speakers Series will present Elizabeth Smart, child abduction survivor and present-day advocate, on Feb. 23; and Erin Brockovich, the brash legal clerk turned environmental powerhouse, on April 13.

Lectures are held in Timken Great Hall at the Kent State University at Stark Conference Center. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. Face coverings are required at all times while in the building.

For disability accommodations, please email starkcmc@kent.edu.

For more information about the series, visit www.kent.edu/stark/featured-speakers-series.
 

Get Started
Tuesday, September 07, 2021

Kent State University at Stark is preparing high school juniors and seniors and their parents on how to choose the right college. Get Started: A Crash Course in College Planning, a free information session designed to facilitate a smooth transition from high school to college. This event is intended for students preparing to attend any higher education institution and is not limited to Kent State Stark.

Get Started: A Crash Course in College Planning will guide the process of choosing the right college by breaking down preferences, needs, resources, academic program offerings, athletics, scholarships and other aspects that give the student the best chance for a successful college career. Session topics include how to choose a major, financial aid options, the right time to apply for college, what to look for in a college, and how to get scholarships, among others. Optional campus tours will also be offered.

GET STARTED: A CRASH COURSE IN COLLEGE PLANNING

THURSDAY, SEPT. 30, 2021
5 P.M.
MAIN HALL AUDITORIUM
KENT STATE UNIVERSITY AT STARK

 
RESERVE YOUR SPOT BY WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 29

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION

5 P.M. REGISTRATION OPENS
5:15 P.M.      OPTIONAL CAMPUS TOUR
6 P.M.
 
 
 
 
 
GET STARTED: A CRASH COURSE IN COLLEGE PLANNING   
- Why College?
- College Visits - What to Ask and Where to Go
- How to Pick a College - the Timeline and Process
- Exploring All Your Financial Aid Options
- Where to Seek out Scholarships

CONTACT

Beau Gannon
Office of Admissions
132 Main Hall
330-244-3274
bgannon2@kent.edu

2021-22 Featured Speakers Series
2021-22 Featured Speakers Series
Thursday, August 26, 2021

Kent State University at Stark is kicking off its 75th anniversary celebration with a lineup of notable speakers headlining the 30th season of the campus’ storied Featured Speakers Series.

These household names range from Elizabeth Smart, the child abduction survivor and present-day advocate; Erin Brockovich, the brash legal clerk turned environmental powerhouse; and Maxwell King, a major philanthropist who wrote the biography of beloved Mr. Fred Rogers. 

The community is invited to attend Kent State University at Stark’s Featured Speakers Series with its impressive selection of personalities. 

“We have always considered the Featured Speakers Series our gift to the community,” said Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., Kent State Stark’s dean and chief administrative officer. “For 30 years, this popular Kent State Stark series has attracted thousands of community members – many loyal series followers – to our campus to take advantage of a rare, free opportunity to be introduced to national and international experts on a wide range of topics and issues that shape our society.” 

Seachrist said this year’s series is especially meaningful because it coincides with the campus’ 75th anniversary celebration. 

“As our campus prepares to celebrate its 75th anniversary during the upcoming 2021-2022 academic year, we reflect on the relationships fostered, the lives enriched and the countless community partnerships formed over the past 75 years,” she said. “As Stark County’s public university, serving the community means so much to Kent State University at Stark. We provide affordable, quality academic programs that change lives across the region.”


2021-2022 FEATURED SPEAKERS
 

Maxwell KingMAXWELL KING
TUESDAY, NOV. 9, 2021
7:30 P.M.

 

 
Maxwell King is the author of the first full-length biography of Fred Rogers, “The Good Neighbor: The Life and Work of Fred Rogers”. As former editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer and a director of the Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media, King created this definitive portrait of Rogers, a beloved figure, cherished by multiple generations. King’s four-decade career also includes presidencies at two of the country’s largest philanthropies – The Pittsburgh Foundation and Heinz Endowments. His strong advocacy for vulnerable groups – at least 30% of the region’s population – in the benefit streams of a resurgent Pittsburgh, anchored a signature organizing principle: 100 Percent Pittsburgh.
 

Elizabeth SmartELIZABETH SMART
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 23, 2022
7:30 P.M.

 

 
The abduction of Elizabeth Smart was one of the most followed child abduction cases of our time. Abducted in 2002, Smart’s captors controlled her by threatening to kill her and her family if she tried to escape. Police safely reunited Smart with her family nine months later. Through this traumatic experience, Smart has become an advocate for change related to child abduction, recovery programs and national legislation. The founder of the Elizabeth Smart Foundation, Smart has helped promote The National AMBER Alert, The Adam Walsh Child Protection & Safety Act and other safety legislation. She also has chronicled her experiences in the New York Times best-selling book, “My Story” and has recently released a new book about reclaiming one’s life, “Where There’s Hope”.
 

Erin BrockovichERIN BROCKOVICH
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2022
7:30 P.M.

 

 
While it’s been over 20 years since Julia Roberts starred in the Oscar-winning film, “Erin Brockovich”, it turned an unknown legal researcher into a 20th century icon by showcasing how her dogged persistence was the impelling force behind the largest medical settlement lawsuit in history. Today, Erin Brockovich is president of Brockovich Research & Consulting, and she is currently involved in numerous environmental projects worldwide. She has requests for her help in groundwater contamination complaints in every state within the country, Australia and other international hot spots. A best-selling author, Brockovich’s latest release, “Superman’s Not Coming: Our National Water Crisis and What We the People Can Do About It”, drew wide media attention before its publication.


CELEBRATING 30 YEARS OF NOTABLE SPEAKERS

These three speakers will join an impressive list of past speakers at Kent State Stark. Over the past 30 years, the Featured Speakers Series has included the following notable speakers, among others: Golden Globe-winning actor Henry Winkler, civil rights activist Jesse Jackson, national political broadcaster George Stephanopoulos, journalist and National Geographic Explorer host Lisa Ling, tennis star Billie Jean King, rags-to-riches prodigy Chris Gardner, legendary drummer Max Weinberg, ice cream entrepreneur Jerry Greenfield, cinematographer Spike Lee, CNN’s broadcast journalist Anderson Cooper, Minnesota Supreme Court Justice Alan Page, distinguished astronaut Mark Kelly, best-selling author Nicholas Sparks and acclaimed journalists Soledad O’Brien and John Quinones.

At this time, Kent State University at Stark is planning for in-person events, but this is subject to change. Masks will be required at all gatherings.

All lectures are free and open to the public; however, tickets will be required. Detailed information about how to obtain tickets will be released before each event.

For additional information, visit www.kent.edu/stark/featured-speakers-series; and follow Kent State Stark on social @KentStateStark. 
 

Bathi Kasturiarachi and Ashley Meinke
Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Sitting in her high school calculus class senior year, it all clicked for Ashley Meinke. Math was her passion.

Fast-forward to today, Meinke is in her 11th year teaching mathematics at Perry High School and is active with the school’s Math Club. She spends her days with top math students, teaching Honors Pre-Calculus and AP Calculus to upperclassmen. 

Meinke is at home in the classroom, spending time there as a teacher – and a student. She received her undergraduate degree from Kent State University at Stark and her master’s degree at the Kent Campus. 

That’s when she developed a great working relationship with Bathi Kasturiarachi, Ph.D., associate professor of mathematics at Kent State Stark. Namely, Kasturiarachi served as her professor, worked with her on her honors thesis and, later, as her master’s thesis advisor. Following her collegiate career, Meinke also has invited Kasturiarachi to Perry on several occasions to do math presentations. 

Given their history, it was no surprise when Kasturiarachi approached Meinke with the idea to work together again, this time with their respective colleagues, and apply for the $5,000 Mathematical Association of America’s (MAA) Dolciani Mathematics Enrichment Grant, which they recently received with the help of the Stark County Educational Service Center. Kasturiarachi is the first faculty member to receive a prestigious MAA grant for Kent State University. 

Creating opportunities 

The proposal? An intensive, weeklong summer mathematics workshop for students all across Stark County next year – the 2022 Stark County Summer Math Academy.

“I think this will really allow us to hone in on some kids who maybe aren’t involved in sports or other things and academics is a little more their niche,” said Meinke. “And hang onto the kids who aren’t as represented.” 

The Dolciani Enrichment Grant helps fund mathematics programs targeting first-generation, low-income, minority and female students interested in the STEM fields.

“A lot of (the schools) have been selected from the rural areas in the U.S., whether it’s Native American, whether it’s Hispanic communities,” Kasturiarachi said. “(The MAA has been) very thoughtful about which groups are underrepresented. I’m glad that we were able to bring it to Stark County.”

Students from all over Stark County will have the opportunity to apply for the Summer Math Academy. The 45 students who are accepted will self-select into one of three concentrations: 1) Advanced Calculus; 2) Data Science; or 3) Explorations in Pure Math. At least 25% of the chosen applicants will be women and underrepresented students.

And before you think this math academy will be all lecture-based, Kasturiarachi challenges you to reconsider. 

“It will be more hands-on. It will be discovery based. The students will be immersed in a (mathematical) problem right away and they’ll be doing work on that,” explained Kasturiarachi. “And the very last day, they will do a final presentation in small groups of the larger project we’ve designed.”

The small groups will be led by Meinke and Kasturiarachi, as well as another Perry math teacher, David Olszewski, and two other Kent State Stark faculty members, including: Paul Andaloro, Ph.D., assistant professor of mathematics; and Michele Heron, Ph.D., associate professor of education.

Meinke is looking forward to the unique interactive approach. 

“I’m excited about getting kids excited about math,” she said. “We do so much in math class, but it’s usually just a lot of routine examples. I think that the academy will open their eyes to what they can do with mathematics beyond just the routine problems that they’re used to seeing.”

She is also aware of the importance of such experiences to high school students, especially those planning on going to college.

“At our school, we don’t have computer science classes, so this is an opportunity for them to be exposed to that, and (get) a little taste of what college math will be like, too,” Meinke said. “College math classes are so different from a high school class – a lot more proof-based… That’s not something that we always have time to do during the regular school day.”


 

Apply to Summer Math Academy

 
STEM fields are for everyone

Both Meinke and Kasturiarachi are hoping that programs, like this one, can change students’ views about mathematics and STEM fields.

“The goal of the grant is to get that curiosity spinning a little bit,” explained Kasturiarachi. “STEM fields are generally considered ‘hard’, and people just try to stay away from them. And, so, by getting the curiosity going, and showing them that they can be good at doing fundamental projects and research and having the technology behind them is very helpful. That’s the goal. For students to go back and say, ‘I had this opportunity. Can I continue this kind of thing in college?’ ”

Meinke agrees.

“It’s interesting because even though I teach the top math students, they’re not all necessarily interested in continuing. I’m a steppingstone to where they want to go sometimes,” she said. “I think there is kind of a stigma and a fear, but hopefully, through things like the academies, we can start to put an end to that.”

Kasturiarachi looks forward to seeing the spark.

“I’m most excited to see a change in the students,” he said. “As long as they bring that excitement and enthusiasm to do it – it is rewarding in multiple ways. I see that in my classroom as well at Kent State. They finally get it, and they say ‘Oh, I wish someone had told me this is how it was done.’ I’m looking forward to getting to that point.”

Meinke hopes to experience the moments that ignited her passion for math.

“I’m really just looking forward to revisiting a lot of my old textbooks and jumping back in and reliving some of those math memories,” she said. “This isn’t content I get to necessarily work with anymore, so I think through re-sparking my love, I’ll be able to then bring that into the academy for our local students.”

If the Stark County Summer Math Academy is successful, the program grant is renewable. 

And based on the passion both Kasturiarachi and Meinke have for mathematics and students, it’s an equation that results in success.  
 

Instruments of the late Charlie Wentz to be used in Ashtabula program.
Sunday, July 25, 2021

Airplanes meant a lot to Charlie Wentz. An aerospace engineer, Wentz was always reaching for the sky as a pilot, flight instructor and a professor in Kent State University’s College of Aeronautics and Engineering. Now, flight instruments he once owned will be used in the airplane maintenance program being established by Kent State University at Ashtabula.

It is an example of the strong relationship Regional Campuses have – working together and partnering in ways that foster student success. So, when Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., dean and chief administrative officer of Kent State University at Stark, came across her late husband’s flight gauges – used to show airspeed, altitude and more – she knew she had to make a call.

“When I came across these four airplane instruments from a dashboard, I immediately thought of Ashtabula,” Seachrist explained. “If these gauges can be used in their program, well, that would have meant so much to Charlie.”

When the call came, so did a smile for Susan J. Stocker, Ph.D., dean and chief administrative officer of the Ashtabula Campus. While she and Seachrist have been Kent State colleagues for about 20 years, Stocker just had the opportunity to get to know Wentz a few years ago.

“He was really an all-around good guy,” Stocker said. “There are both work connections and personal connections that are made over time, and this is a prime example of the good things that come as a result.”

 The Ashtabula Campus has its sights set on launching the airplane maintenance program post-pandemic.

The curriculum is being developed by Jonathan Weaver, academic program coordinator for the College of Aeronautics and Engineering’s Aircraft Maintenance School.

“When you are teaching airplane maintenance, the more hands-on examples that you can provide – the better,” Weaver said. “Charlie’s gauges will really help so many students as they learn about airplane mechanics and how all parts work together to produce flight.”

And thanks to changes in FAA requirements, the Ashtabula program is moving forward.

“Whether we house it at Kent or we house it with another maintenance repair agency, now is the time because we are here to meet the needs of business and industry and there is a shortage of trained airplane maintenance workers,” Stocker said.

She expects that demand to increase as the vaccinated public resumes travel.

“We are really pleased to not only be able to partner with the Regional Campus system, but now to partner with the College of Aeronautics and Engineering, which will benefit from the gift of Charlie’s equipment,” Stocker said. “Those instruments will always be remembered as Charlie’s. We are so grateful to keep his memory alive for something he loved and was known for.”

Professors in the program expressed joy, wonderment and gratitude for the gift. “These were our Charlie’s?” they asked.

Yes, our Charlie’s.

And now they’ll teach future aviators to reach for the sky.

Spring 2021 dean's list students
Spring 2021 dean's list students
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Kent State University at Stark has announced its Dean’s List and President’s List for the spring 2021 semester. 

Requirements for the Dean’s List include a 3.40 grade point average or above for the spring 2021 semester and at least 12 letter-graded (A, B, etc.) credit hours completed by the end of the semester.

President’s List criteria are a 4.00 grade point and at least 15 letter-graded credit hours completed by the end of the semester.

A part-time Dean's List follows the President's and Dean's List.
 

SPRING 2021 PRESIDENT'S* & DEAN'S LIST

The following students have been named to the Kent State Stark Dean’s List. Those students designated with a star (*) have been named to the Kent State University President’s List. 

Jay Aaron
Taylor Adams
Destini Adorisio
Evangeline Agum
Madeline Aladich
Haleigh Alexander
Albaraa Alhazmi
Brianna Allen
Lillian Allen
Mallory Allen
Morgan Allen
Sara Allison
Brittany Alterio
Chloe Amato
Ethan Armstrong
Vincent Arrigo
Mackenzie Ash
Olivia Ash
Meghan Badger
Maya Bachtel*
Spencer Bagwell
Courtnae Bailey
Ron Bailey
Lorenzo Bair
Alyssa Baker
Anna Baker
Brooke Baker
Tyler Baker
Samantha Baranek
Kreigh Barnette
Elaine Bast
Chelsea Bates
Alexa Battista*
Samantha Battista
Mason Batty
Amanda Baxter
Rachel Beam
Shannon Beavers
Melissa Becerra
Madison Behon
Chelsea Berish
Robert Bever*
Brian Beverly
Emma Bezek
Katherine Billock
Justin Bioni
Brandy Bishop*
Rachel Bishop
Kade Bitikofer
Kylie Blair*
Matthew Blanton
Joshua Blasko
Madison Bodo
Joshua Boley*
Kaidan Bolyard
Mackayli Bolyard-Pizana*
Leah A. Borotkanics
Juliana Borsellino
Grace Boswell
Miranda Bourne
Isabella Bouzari*
Rachel Bowe
Jaimie Bowen
LaKaleb Bowen
Maxx Bowman
Sydney Boyd
Constance Bozeman
Hunter Bradley
Abigail Breiding
Makenzea Briggs
Collin Brink
Spencer Brown
Tiffany Brown
Jordan Browning*
Tristan Bryant
Alexis Budimlic
Zoe Buell
Thomas Bullock
Heather Burkhart-Hill
Lauren Burton
Randi Bush
Brent Butler
Paul Byers
Crystal Byler
Donovan Byler
Arikah Cady
Gregory Cain
Carly Caldwell
Hanna Camulli
Natalie Cannon
Emily Cannone
Lauren Carpenter
Clay Casper
Morgan Casper*
Pablo Castillo Gomez
Carissa Casto-Leglise
Megan Chatelain
Deanna Chatman
Taylor Chism
Harlee Christner
Maggie Cincurak
Anna Clark*
Anthony Clement
Miranda Click
Jordan Cline
Makayla Clos*
Colton Cochran
Lyndsay Cole
Rylee Cole
Jayden Collins
Kylie Collmar
Joy Colvin
Nicholas Comune
Kiersten Congrove*
Hannah Conley
Maryn Contini
Kaitlyn Conto
Carson Cook
Danielle Coontz
Marissa Cooper*
Sean Cooper
Valentino Corbisello
Kaitlyn Cordell
Kerry Coss
Morgan Cottrell
Bradley Cottrill
Amanda Cox
Jaclyn Coyle
Grace Cozart
Sean Craney
Brayden Crites
Isabelle Cullen
Taylur Cunningham*
Britney Cupery
Nathan Cutting*
Danielle Dalton
Emily Daniels
Jennifer Daring
Adam Davis
Jackie Davis
Katie Dawson
Morgan Dawson
Hannah DeBos
Nicole Deertz
Jenna Del Valle
Jacob Demaree
Maya Demchak
Leo Diamantis
Arabella Dillard
Racquel Dillard
Rylie Doane
Mattison Dolan
April Doyle*
DeLynn Drescher*
Madison Dubay
Nathan Dugan
Evan Dukeman
Samantha Dunlavey
Joshua Dunn
Conner Durant
Daniel Earley*
Lucas Eastep
Katherine Edwards*
Jared Eichelberger
Mckenzie Eiseman
Paige Elder
Theodore ElFaye
Melissa Engstrom
Paul Evans
Allison Eyster
Brandon Fee
Ashlie Filimonuk
Grace Film
Brandon Finch
Courtney Fink
Anthony Fiorille
Derek Firth
Michelle Fitz
Asia Flynn
Savannah Foltz
Tristan Ford
Amanda Fowler*
Emma Francis
Olivia Francis
Kaylyn Franklin
Joseph Fuller
Tessa Fusko
Savannah Gale
Noah Galvin
Rebecca Garren
Grace Garritano
Rachel Garritano
Dominiquea Gary
Ryan Gavorcik
Sean Gayler
Kat Gaynesbloom
Jacob Geisheimer
Blair Gemmel
Samuel Gentile
Hannah Gill*
Carley Gillespie
Joshua Glover
Cameron Gmitra
Maliq Goncalves
Emily Gordon
Michael Govan
Benjamin Graber
Jenna Graves*
Holly Greaser
Gabrielle Grimes
Nicholas Grishaber
Daniel Groves
Madison Grzybowski
Landynn Gundlach
Donald Haid
McKenzie Haidet*
Caden Haines-Tessanne
Mary Hammel*
Jade Hamrick
Morgan Hancock
Kaitlynn Hanslik*
Seth Harbert
Jeremiah Harbour
Morgan Hardin
Charlie Harless
Toriana Harris
Kelly Harter*
Christian Hartley
Reyard Hasan
Claire Haswell
Chelsea Hatfield
Sydney Hathaway
Rebecca Haught
Kaitlyn Hays
Danielle Hearn
Nicholas Hearn
Whitney Hendershot
Anna Hensley
Emily Hershberger
Jillian Herstine
Imari Hill*
Brock Himmelheber
Mitchell Hines
Jennifer Hinton
Joseph Hoffman
Elizabeth Holder
Lisa Holder
Julia Holik
Lana Hollis
Hannah Holzopfel
Skylyn Hooks
Mason Hoopingarner
Matthew Hudak
Govan Hudson*
Amber Huffman
Owen Humbert
Danielle Hunter
Mariah Hupp
Walter Hutt
Alexis Hymes
Leanna Iden
Sarah Iden
Sophia Idriss
Tanner Immel
Madison Incarnato
Kaylie Irwin
Muhammed Ismail
Alec Johnson
Paige Johnson
Shaylynn Johnson
Zachary Johnson
Erin Jones
Hanna Jones*
Sean Jordan
Tessa Joseph
Brendan Kambrick
Jaden Kandel
Elayna Kapelka
Luke Kapitan
Mary Karcher
Thomas Karcher
Marius Karl
Benjamin Kelling
Madeline Kelly
Shannon Kendrick
William Kennedy
Rafika Khalfallah
Eman Khan
Kathryn Kidwell
Haley Killingsworth
Tessa Smith Kintz
Abigail Klein
Peyton Knight
Ashley Knoch
Jaret Knox
Donovan Koman
Katelyn Konetsky*
Selena Konjovic
Kellie R. Kordinak*
Nicole Kovatch
Tristan Kraft
Gavin Krall
Kimberly Kroh
Mariam Kromah
Laura Kronk
Madeline Kurtz
Ali Lancaster
Eric Landrum
Julian Larew
Alissa Latak
Zachary Lattur
Hudson Law
Sarah Lawver
Robert Leahy
Kaitlyn Leasure
Emma Lego
Alyssa Lehmier
Jackson Leventhal
Kaitlyn Libb
Lauren Lieser
Jonathan Lilly
Morgan Lineweaver
Rishma Lingden
Miles Listerman
Claire Loffarelli
Brenden Longwell
Grace Lucarelli
Reed Lucas
Robert Lucas
Brycen Ludwig
Payton Lutz
Dallas Lynn
Mason Madenfort
Jenna Maher
Rebecca Makens
Kayla Maloof
Madolyn Manack
Nicole Marran*
LeAndra Martin
Macy Martin
Madison Martin
Jessica Mathews*
Daniel Maurer
Tessa Maurer
Tejasvini Mavuleti
Schyler Maxhimer
Lauren May
Ryan Mazanec
Alyssa McCarthy*
Adam McCloskey
Zachary McCormick
Brandon McCune
Ashlee McDermott
Maria McDonald
Miranda McDonald
Austin McElroy
Aine McGee
Abigail McGhee
Taylor McIntyre*
Leeann McKenna
Aleah McKenzie
Tyler McKenzie
Blaine Mclaughlin
Logan McNutt
Jennifer Mellinger*
Malina Meese
Rachel Menegay
Makell Merrick*
Aleah Mesaros
Hannah Messner*
Madison Meszaros*
Thomas Meyers
Kayla Michels
Amanda Miller*
Ellie Miller
Joanne Miller
Joseph Miller
Kaleb Miller
Katherine Miller
Kayla Miller
Leah Miller
Melissa Miller
Madison Mills
Rebecca Mills
Nevaeh Mitchell
Abby Mizener
Ellie Mizener
Katelyn Mizener
Branden Monroe
Haley Monroe
Brianna Moore
Lynnita Moore
Giovanni Moretta
Kelsey Morgan
Emma Mori
Jessica Morosko
Samantha Morris
Shanae Moss
David Mullett
Sabrina Murch
Jonathan Mustard
Carlie Myers*
Danielle Myers
Sierra Myers
Olivia Nagy
Elizabeth Narris*
Joshua Nason
Susan Nason
Clay Neisel
Joseph Nelson
Grayson Newell
Hannah Nicholas
Michelle Nicholas
Kaitlyn Nicholson*
Skylar Nicholson
Kaitlin Nime
Ryan Nims
Kaitlyn Nist
Autumn Norris
Faith Nowak
Brianna Nutter
Trevor Nutter
Daniel O’Connor
Taylor O’Donnell
William Oeffner
Baylee Offenberger
Keegan Offenberger
Samantha Ogg
Dylan Ohm
Taylor O’Lear
Kayla Onslow
Chloe Orin
Joan Oster
Alyssa Owens
Anju Pandhak
Katelyn Patterson
Roy Patton
Blake Pearsall
Connor Pearsall
Madison Petersen
Haley Pettit
Jason Phillips
Trey Phillips
Jacob Pinkley
Matt Plucinski
Alexis Pochubay
Carrie Powell
Riley Pullen
Jasmine Ramey
Kiera Ramey
Alexandros Ramos
Alexis Ranalli
Kayla Rauschenbach
Alia Ray
Emily Real
Michael Rector
Makaila Rhoads
Rylie Rich
Charleigh Riffle*
Samantha Riffle
Heidi Rine
Abigail Risaliti
Mariah Ritchey
Renee Robinette
Luke Rosato
Micah Rose
Brittany Roush
Neil Ruble
Steven Rudder*
Kaitlyn Rueschman
Giovanna Ruskowski
Braden Russell
Ronna Russell*
Samantha Sacconi
Kayla Saffell
Lexa Saia
Khalila Saleh
Ashmita Samal
Jaquiez Sampson
Jonathan Sams
Nicole Sanderson
Christopher Schell
CJ Schulman
Hannah Schweier
Morgan Sciarini
Rachel Scott
Yaseen Shaikh
Joni Shaw
Jack Shoup
Shana Shultz
Kara Sibbio
Chloe Sickman
Leah Simpson
Kaylin Slapnicker
Patiance Sloan
Taylor Slone
Ashlee Slutz*
Julia Smith*
Natalie Smith
Alexus Snyder
Brandy Snyder
Tessa Snyder
Leah Snow*
Maranda Solomon
Cassandra Soloninka
Megan Somerick
Valentine Spangler
Andrew Spence
Emily Spencer
Elizabeth Spieth
Brianna Sprout
David Squires
Mariah Stanish
Jenna Stanley
Michael Stanley
Destiny Starks
Kylee Stevens
Joshua Stewart
Andrew Stopp
Robin Storad*
Jayden Strawder
Janay Strayton
Katelyn Stringham
Jayma Sullivan
Payton Sullivan
Riley Sullivan
Tori Swain
Benjamin Swartz
Madison Swartzentruber*
Alexander Sweeney*
Jessica Sweeney
Michael Swickard
Rhea Szabo
Camille Tenney
Olivia Terranova
Sydney Terry
Damian Thatcher
Emily Thomas
Alex Thompson
Dyllon Thompson
Brooke Thorne
Abigail Thouvenin
Heather Thrush
Alex Tice
Jadon Tinnon
Nicholas Tomola
Ethan Tonkel*
Katelyn Toth
Kaitlyn Troyer
Tara Tucci
Steven Turik
Alyssa Ulatowski
Lana Ulrich
Kaitlyn Unklesbay*
Lexee Valentine
Austin Vandegrift*
Taylor Vanderveen
Jaban VanKirk
Nicole Vargo*
Adam Varlamos
Louis Varlamos
Madeline Vernyi
Sanjana Vivekanandan
Athena Vohs
Katelyn Walker
Kaitlyn Wallace*
William Waller
Hannah Wallis
Kathryn Walsh*
Sharon Walsh
Tatum Walulik
Hunter Warren
Joshua Warren
Autumn Wassam
Rachael Wayts
Hailey Weaver*
Larissa Weaver
Hailey Weidlich
Madelyn Wells*
Makenzie Westfall
Dylan Weygandt
Emma Whalen
Carlie Whisner
Malori Wike
Beau Wilkinson
Brooke Wilkinson
Walter Wilks
Brandon Williams
Jason Williams
Julie Williams
Lindsay Williams
Zachary Williams
Deonte Wilson
Kaeli Wilson
Mikayla Wirkki
Fox Witt
Bailey Witwer
Nathan Wodzisz
Nick Wodzisz
Luke Wohlford
Samantha Wolford
Kenneth Woodring
Chase Woods
Casey Worges
Stephanie Wrest
Olivia Wright
Megan Yelichek
Alexander Yost
Emma Zbuka
EMI Zehner
Sam Zehner
Dustin Zellers
Gabrielle Zitek
Spencer Zolla


SPRING 2021 PART-TIME DEAN'S LIST

The following have been named to the Dean's List for part-time students:

Corban Aaron
Alexander Adams
Kaela Alex
Anastasia Allison
Leah Andaloro
Caroline Arnold
Karilyn Arnold
Blair Arthur
Dustin Baughman
Mercedes Baxter
Dina Beachy
Cody Bennett
Emily Berger
Taylor Bish
Summer Black
Emma Blake
Noah Blaz
Sarah Boda
Aaron Boggs
Giovanni Borsellino
Madeline Bosler
Renee Braucher
Parker Brennan
Paul Bretz
Trey Brock
Clara Butcher
Emma Campbell
Andrew Carozza
Bianca Chambliss
Makayla Chandler
Rinoa Chech
Nathaniel Cice
Allyson Clapp
Jacob Collins
Alexandra Coseriu
Grace Cunningham
Malena Cybak
Amber Darocha
Mark Davenport
Fiona David
Olivia De Vries
Loren Deck
Emily Decker
Kurt Denning
Aine Donley
Nathan Donze
Madison Dornack
Ethan Douglas
Sarah Dudek
Samuel Dunlevy
Sydnie Dye
Zoe Ellenbogen
Connie Ellis
Hayden Evans
Rachel Fisk
Dyllan Fox
Macaira Fox
Collin Fraelich
Samuel Fraelich
Cole Gabel
Alyssa Galicia
Alyssa Gaynor
Meagan Gear
Sydnee Goff
Mallory Good
Nikki Gray
Gregory Haas
Jillian Hall
Alaina Harless
Claire Hawes
Jylian Haynes
April Hazaimeh
Tyler Hederson
Spencer Hennis
Destiny Henson
Alyssa Henzel
Robert Hietanen
Cassidy Higgins
Kayla Hill
Emma Hochadel
Tamika Hofius
Madalyn Hogan
Alexa Hollinger
Blaine Horvath
Drew Hostetler
Emma House
Elizabeth Hout
Carlee Hudgens
Theodore Hyatt
Jeremy Ickes
Kayla Jasinski
Robert Joseph
Hannah Kardohely
Barry Kaschner
Bailey Keane
Lauren Keithley
Christopher Kessell
Elizabeth Kindig
Maxwell Kirby
Kari Klein
Ila Klick
Luke Kneidel
Emma Koons
Zachary Koston
Jenna Kurtz
Jennifer Lambert
Kaitlynn Latham
David Lattibeaudiere
Kaden Lau
Ivy Lee
Anthony Leighton
Clara Lemmon
Autumn Little
Victoria Lombardi
Noah Lovas
Brittany Lucas
Christian Lucas
Lauren Mackall
Dana Magella
Rylee Manley
Brant Marchand
Lucas Marusiak
Madeline Matthews
Stacy Matuschek
Joel Maus
Jennifer May
Dylan Mazon
Sara McDowell
Jacob McLachlan
Madelyn Mealer
Lauren Meredith
Christian Miller
Marissa Miller
Mya Miller
Jonathan Mong
Nathaniel Monnette
JoAnna Moore
Tabetha Moore
Erica Mora
Makenna Morucci
Sarah Nagel
Allison Neary
Valerie Neman
Phillip Ogilvie
Hunter Ohm
Robin Oster
Michael Palmer
Olivia Paoletti
Amanda Paquette
James Parsons
Taylor Perry
Sam Pleva
Alisha Pocock
Kaleb Powlison
Cassandra Pratt
Matthew Proffitt
Brooklyn Pugh
Aidan Raber
Lauren Ramey
Danielle Rearick
Desiree Reed
Mason Reith
Heather Rice
Ashley Rich
Joshua Richards
Tegan Richards
Amanda Roberts
Christie Rogers
Lauren Rogers
Meredith Rogers
Lauren Rohr
Makenah Rohr
Nicholas Sampsel
Mary Sandlin
Brittany Shaw
Michael Sheets
Jenna Sheridan
Jenna Shoup
Marcus Simon
Nicholas Sirohman
Kaitlyn Sliwinski
Jurnee Smith
Katelynne Smith
Melissa Smith
Zachary Smith
Susanna Snavely
Sophia Soleiman
Aaron Sommers
Nolan Speegle
Liam Spencer
Emma Springer
Moriah Stanford
Emma Stewart
Rebecca Stratton
Natalie Strawn-Shuss
Hayden Stutz
Kent Sundheimer
Efrem Swoope
Radley Tan
Cecilia Taylor
Christopher Taylor
Colin Taylor
Logan Thomas
Alexander Tregub
Marcia Trouts
Bennett Utter
Olivia Vargas
Emily Walter
Abigail Ward
Amber Ward
Michael Warner
Sophia Warner
Brandon Wigfield
Gwyneth Wilde
Patricia Williams
Drake Wilson
Jean Wilson
Kendrick Wilson
Jessica Wishart
Brandon Witmer
Matthew Yeager
Selah Yost
Rana Yu
Nolan Zubaty
Dawn Zuniga
 

Sara Haidet awarded Innis Maggiore Endowed Scholarship for Communications
Sara Haidet awarded Innis Maggiore Endowed Scholarship for Communications
Thursday, June 17, 2021

Sara Haidet and Dick MaggioreWhile many young children dream of becoming an astronaut, a rock star or even a ballerina, Sara Haidet wasn’t drawn to such specific big dreams while growing up in the small town of Louisville. Still, her upbringing in this close-knit community paved the way for a growing desire to give back and help people from all walks of life.

Haidet discovered she fit right in at Kent State University at Stark, her Hometown University. After all, it was nearby, affordable and offered quality academic programs; in fact, she could earn a Kent State University degree without ever having to leave the county.

She started her college career while still in high school, as a College Credit Plus (CCP) student. This natural “people person” was drawn to a field in which she could help folks relay their messages: communication. 

“I never really knew what I wanted to do,” Haidet said. “But I was looking for a degree that is very versatile and gives you many options. Communication was definitely the right choice for me.”

Haidet excelled in her courses. She found the Stark Campus communication faculty to be both welcoming and supportive. 

“The small class sizes meant that I really got to know my professors and they cared about me as a student. They cared about my dreams and aspirations,” said Haidet, recalling one recent Saturday afternoon when Professor Lisa Waite took the time for a phone call. “She (Waite) offered great advice and guidance to help me get to where I am today.”

And, these days, this new graduate is working full-time at Innis Maggiore, the nation’s leading positioning ad agency, located right in Stark County. 

A former intern at the agency, 21-year-old Haidet landed her position even before graduating in May. “To have a full-time job lined up was truly a blessing,” she said. “It shows that Kent State Stark prepared me well and that Innis Maggiore really cares about giving back to local students, just like me.”

Haidet is also a two-time recipient of the Innis Maggiore Endowed Scholarship for Communications. This generous scholarship helped her graduate from Kent State Stark debt-free.

“Offering our endowed scholarship for communications allows us to play a key role in Strengthening Stark and encourage talented young people to stay here in our community,” said Dick Maggiore, Innis Maggiore president and CEO. “We’re proud to be able to assist local students who have an interest in marketing communications and help provide an opportunity to fulfill their dreams of working in this amazing field.”

Haidet is an especially remarkable person and a great asset to the agency, said Maggiore, adding: “We’re thrilled to have her on board!” 

“Not only did she receive the endowed scholarship twice, but she was also an intern at the agency,” he said. “During her internship, Sara demonstrated a strong work ethic and an eye for detail. She enthusiastically embraces each assignment whether it be project management or learning how to populate content into websites. Most of all, Sara has an inquisitive mind – she is eager to learn about the multiple facets of positioning, marketing communications and how to provide excellent client service.”

Maggiore said it’s clear that Haidet will be successful in whatever she puts her mind to. And whether her career keeps her in Canton or takes her to a big-city stage, it’s clear this young standout will shoot for the stars. 


Dick MaggioreDonor Spotlight: 3 Questions with Dick Maggiore, co-founder, president and CEO of Innis Maggiore – America’s leading Positioning Ad Agency

 
1. What does offering the Innis Maggiore Endowed Scholarship for Communications mean to the agency?

I was privileged to serve on Kent State University at Stark’s Board of Trustees for about a decade. A few of those years were as its chairman. I began each meeting by reminding the board members why we’re here by saying, “As the level of education attainment rises in a community; so does its quality of life.” Education may be the No. 1 strategy responsible for enabling each of us to be independent and productive and thereby not rely on the government or social service organizations. It’s about treating the cause rather than the symptoms.

Many communities, including ours, suffer from “brain drain” – the loss of our college graduates to bigger cities. Research suggests that connecting students with the community, by way of internships, helps to keep these folks in their home communities. At Innis Maggiore, we expose interns to our client and supplier companies, other young professionals as well as local industry events. Even though most have lived here their entire lives, they haven’t seen our community through these eyes. It’s a new experience, bringing to life much of what they’ve learned in the classroom. 

2. Why has Innis Maggiore chosen to provide this endowed scholarship opportunity to Kent State University at Stark students, specifically?

We are deeply committed to supporting the growth of Stark County and the Innis Maggiore Endowed Scholarship is one example of our investment in the community’s future workforce. Kent State University at Stark is a perfect choice because of our common goal to develop first-class communicators. 

3. Why is the study of communication and communications-related fields so important? From your vantage point, how does Kent State Stark prepare comm students so well for the real world?

There’s probably never been a more critical time in the field of communications. The speed, volume and intensity of information bombarding each of us is unprecedented. As a result, businesses, government, NGOs and cultural influencers are struggling to effectively inform and engage customers and constituents. 

Kent State Stark offers communication students a powerful combination of a rigorous curriculum, professors who are leaders in their field – plus the opportunity for hands-on skills development. The result is that graduates are uniquely prepared to hit the ground running.


Find Out More

Innis Maggiore originally endowed the Innis Maggiore Endowed Scholarship for Communications in 2007. Full-time Kent State University at Stark students who reside in Stark County, major in communications, marketing, public relations, journalism or advertising, and demonstrate financial need, are eligible to apply for the annual scholarship. Visit www.kent.edu/stark/scholarships for more information.

Are you interested in making a real difference in the life of a student? Establishing a scholarship at Kent State University at Stark can align with the area of your passion and change a student’s life forever. Please contact Beth Fuciu, associate director of philanthropy and alumni engagement, at bfuciu@kent.edu or call Beth at 330-244-3225 to find out more today.

Future Flashes Day
Future Flashes Day
Friday, May 21, 2021

FUTURE FLASHES DAY
JUNE 9 & 10, 2021

 
We can't wait to show you around!

Come experience a campus tour of Kent State University at Stark. Meet our admissions staff, get your questions answered, tour campus with a current student and learn what makes Kent State University at Stark your hometown university. Don't miss out!

Expect to spend about 75 minutes on campus:

  • Small group (10 people max), 45-minute campus walking tours are led by a current student.
  • Before touring the campus, the tour group will meet with a member of the First Year Experience staff for 15 minutes for a general campus overview and to answer questions.

Reservations required.

 
ADMITTED STUDENTS
: If you've been admitted to Kent State Stark,   REGISTER HERE

PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS: If you haven't yet been admitted to Kent State Stark,   REGISTER HERE


CONTACT

Office of Admissions
starkadmissions@kent.edu
330-244-3251

Amanda Cox
Thursday, May 20, 2021

It’s a Saturday morning in 1981. Sunbeams slowly trickle into a small family tent, covered in sparkling morning dew. The sounds of a campfire crackle in the ears of a then 7-year-old Amanda Cox. Yawning and wiping the sleep from her eyes, she unzips the tent, filling her lungs with the crisp, fresh air of a new day – the Rocky Mountain view just as glorious as the day before.

This was a normal weekend for Cox and her family – camping in the mountains not far from where they lived in Colorado Springs.

And it was something that would carve a path in her heart like the winding Colorado River.

Mountain mama

When Cox was 14, her family moved from the Centennial State to the Buckeye State, her parents’ birthplace, to take care of her aging grandparents.

Cox graduated from Norton High School in 1992 and took a year off from school before studying commercial arts at a nearby college. She quickly secured a graphic design job that she loved.

Not long after, Cox was married and began having children of her own – Matthew in 1996, followed by Shaun in 1998.

Like many mothers, the Manchester, Ohio, native decided to stay home and raise her boys.

“As a mom, you do what you have to do,” said Cox. “I loved doing graphic design, but I chose to stay home and take care of my family.”

As her boys grew up, Cox was active with them in Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. She was Shaun’s Cub Scout den leader, troop webmaster, committee member and was on panels for many Eagle Scout board reviews. She cherishes memories of summer camps – hiking, tying knots, cooking over coals and being a teacher of all things outdoors.

One of her favorite memories was going through Wood Badge training.

“I think it’s really important to teach children when they are young to respect nature,” explained Cox. “One of my Wood Badge projects was to create a Leave No Trace program and present it to all of the Cub Scouts. That was a lot of fun because I got to spend some time with them, teaching them the importance of caring for our environment.”

It was that passion that led Cox to take a big step – going back to school.

The climb

“When Shaun graduated high school, I thought ‘I have to do something with my life,’ ” said Cox.

Around 2016, she worked at a home cleaning business. As it often happens in life – Cox was in the right place at the right time. She tidied up for a Kent State University at Stark faculty member who encouraged her to go back to school, adding that a new degree was in the works – environmental studies.

And that was the sign she needed.

At 43 years old, Cox began working toward her environmental studies degree at Kent State Stark. She would be in college at the same time as both of her sons. Matthew was also attending Kent State University and Shaun was at Virginia Military Institute (VMI). Both boys have been extremely proud and supportive of their mom.

“I was thinking, ‘It's about time she went back to school!’ ” said Matthew, who graduated with a degree in information technology.

Determined from the get-go, Cox dove into environmental studies.

“The first class I took – Dr. (Chris) Post’s ‘Nature and Society’ – I realized ‘This is it! I love it! ‘This is so me,’ ” Cox said.

In 2019, she volunteered to take care of Flash’s Food Garden, the cumulative project of the “Campus and Community Gardens” class led by Post, a professor of geography and environmental studies. Cox worked hard to water, weed and harvest daily.

She even took it upon herself to open the campus garden to students who wanted to learn about gardening, or who wanted more school or community involvement. Over the two-month period, 10 to 14 different students, all with unique gardening experience, took her up on the opportunity.

Seeing the summit

Cox has already started as an intern at the James A. Garfield National Historic Site in Mentor, Ohio – a major stepping stone to her dream job.

“When I started this path of my education, my goal was to get a job with the national parks,” said Cox. “To have this internship right out of school – is it too good to be true?”

And the reason she landed the internship has been a full-circle experience. In addition to her Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies with minors in geography and earth science, the national park was interested in her extensive experience with the Scouts and merit badge training.

“This internship is huge!” Cox added. “To get in with the National Parks is so difficult, so that in itself is a huge deal, but to have something that was my goal and to have it – to actually achieve it – it’s been exciting!”

And the apple doesn’t fall far. Cox’s father has worked as a trail maintenance worker for Cuyahoga Valley National Park for nearly 20 years.

“He loves it!” laughed Cox. “He’s 72, and he’s going to be 100 years old, and he’s still going to be working there. I think I get my passion from him.”

The view

On May 14, while most parents watched their child(ren) walk at commencement ceremonies, Cox walked with Matthew. Both left Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium and traveled to Virginia to watch Shaun commission into the U.S. Army and graduate from VMI over Saturday and Sunday.

“It was way more of an emotional weekend because it’s something I shared with my boys,” said Cox, teary-eyed. “To get to walk with my oldest son is – maybe for other kids they might have been embarrassed – but my kids, they support anything that I do, and I think that comes from me supporting everything that they’ve done growing up. I think it’s reciprocal.”

For Matthew, the feeling is mutual.

“I did feel pretty good about graduating with my mom at the same time,” he said. “She's definitely worked hard for what she earned.”

Cox recalled discussing “shared experiences” in her environmental studies classes and how her graduation experience with her sons reflects that.

“My experience was different. I think it would totally be different if I was just (graduating) by myself. It would be more about me. But instead, it’s more about what we accomplished together as a family,” said Cox. “I think it also signifies the end of something, which makes me kind of sad, which is probably why it is so emotional. At this point, my kids are gonna go off and they’re going to go do their own things.”

And while it marks an end, it’s a beginning for Cox, too.

“I’m really excited to start a journey that is something I chose – not just something that came my way to help make ends meet,” she said. “I’m really ready to start my journey.”

The next peak

Five years ago, Cox went back to the Colorado campsite that’s been in her family for 40 years.

“It had been almost 30 years since I had been back,” she said.

But, this time, the mountains didn’t seem as big as she’d remembered them. Within reach, ready for the climb.

“Everything’s smaller in real life, even the mountains,” said Cox, who knows conquering what seems insurmountable begins with a first step – and an open mind.

“I could totally move back here. It’s my home.”

For now, Cox is keeping an open mind.

“There’s so many beautiful places in this world,” she said.

And the possibilities are endless.

Just like the crisp morning Colorado air, for Cox – a 2021 graduate – everything feels new.

 

Jessica Conrad
Jessica Conrad
Thursday, May 20, 2021

Jessica Conrad
Jessica Conrad, Ph.D., a lecturer of English at Kent State University at Stark, has received a Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program award to Austria. 

The U.S. Department of State and the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board announced that Conrad will lecture and research at the University of Graz as part of her project, “Perspectives of American Protest Literature and Culture from Abroad.”

Conrad’s project traces connections between historical examples of early American literary activism to current cultural expressions of protest, particularly in social justice and climate activism. While teachings and scholarship often focus on nonviolent action, such as sit-ins and marches, less attention has been paid to how literature and the arts may have been – and continue to be – used to get the word out, inspire new thinking and call for change.

Conrad will work alongside social and environmental justice scholars in the Graz American Studies department to teach courses, lead doctoral colloquia and collaborate on publications.

“This project flows from Dr. Conrad’s doctoral research, her ongoing research and her excellent teaching of American literature at Kent State University at Stark,” said Robert D. Sturr, Ph.D., assistant dean of academic affairs at Kent State Stark. “She will focus on the role of literature and the arts in social change movements, a subject as relevant today as it was during the 19th century period of American cultural history that Jessica studies.”

As a Fulbright Scholar, Conrad will share knowledge and foster meaningful connections across communities in the United States and Austria. Fulbright Scholars engage in cutting-edge research and expand their professional networks, often continuing research collaborations started abroad and laying the groundwork for forging future partnerships between institutions.

“We look forward to what she will share with colleagues and students upon her return,” said Sturr, adding that Conrad’s award is a tremendous honor for all at Kent State Stark.

The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government. It is designed to forge lasting connections between the United States and other countries, counter misunderstandings, and help people and nations work together toward common goals.

Since its establishment in 1946, the Fulbright Program has enabled more than 390,000 dedicated and accomplished students, scholars, artists, teachers and professionals of all backgrounds to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and find solutions to shared international concerns.

 

 

Jennifer Daring
Wednesday, May 12, 2021

The sun was setting over a little Stow neighborhood in 1995. Eight-year-old Jennifer Daring knew it meant she would have to go inside soon. That was her mother’s rule: be home by dusk.

But Daring was always pushing it. Just a little later. Just a little more time. Just a few more minutes outside to catch the lightning bugs dotting her grandma’s front yard at dusk. Just a second more to collect caterpillars and watch them become something new.

For Daring, outside felt like home. And some things never change.

At 34, Daring is still always outside – hiking, biking, rock climbing, kayaking. And, in May, she will earn her Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies with minors in biological science and geography from Kent State University at Stark, which will put her right where she wants to be.

But, getting here took some time. Like the caterpillars she found as a curious little girl, Daring would go through a metamorphosis, too.

From caterpillar to cocoon

Daring graduated from Stow-Munroe Falls High School in 2005 with little interest in following her peers to college.

Having bounced around a lot as a kid – from low-income housing in a single-parent household with her mom and brother, to living with her grandma, to moving to a home in Munroe Falls, to moving back in with grandma, then to an apartment – what she wanted in life was some stability.

Daring worked in the service industry for several years before making the decision to go to college.

“I decided after being a bartender for five or six years at that point, that, you know, you can’t retire off of a bartender’s salary,” said Daring. “It really kind of put things into perspective for me, and so I decided it wasn’t too late.”

In 2016, she started her collegiate journey at Stark State College to earn an associate degree and, soon after, Daring decided to take it a step further and work toward her bachelor’s degree at Kent State Stark.

Inside the chrysalis

When asked what inspired her to go into environmental studies, one of Kent State Stark’s newest degree programs at the time, Daring didn’t hesitate.

“Bill Nye the Science Guy,” she said, smiling.

As a little girl, Daring watched in awe from her elementary school classes and on the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) at home, as Nye explained, well, everything, it seemed.

“That’s what I grew up with,” she said. “It’s what made me love science. It’s what made me love the outdoors and learning about things and how they work and protecting them.”

So, she dove into the world of environmental studies and hasn’t looked back since. She took classes in geology, entomology, biology, geography – and flourished in the presence of Stark Campus faculty who truly care.

“The connection that you have with the professors here is just so wholesome,” said Daring, mentioning Dr. Chris Post, Dr. Matthew Lehnert, Dr. Robert Hamilton, Dr. Gordon Cromley and Dr. Greg Smith by name. “You can tell they take their time and want to help you succeed. It’s very clear.”

In 2019, Daring began at Summit Metro Parks as an outreach program assistant. In the position that counted as an internship and credit toward her degree, she planned and facilitated her own nature programs for the public, leading themed hikes that focused on trash cleanup, bird-watching and health. She worked with children in the after-school Nature Club, and even had the opportunity to work with the Conservation Department surveying bats, trees and beehives.

Even when the position ended, she stuck with it.

“My seasonal position had expired, but I maintained my relationship with (the Metro Parks) through being a volunteer,” she said. “So, I stayed consistent with them and kept my foot in that door so they didn’t forget about me.”

And they wouldn’t.

Stretching her new wings

In addition to her work with Summit Metro Parks, Daring took the helm of the Northeast Ohio women’s adventure group, Green Girl Gang, at the beginning of 2020.

“I really get to unite women of like-minded interests all together,” said Daring. “We do anything from rock climbing, backpacking, mountain biking, kayaking, trash cleanups – pretty much anything outdoorsy.”

When Daring was challenged in her Integrative Senior Project course to act on environmental awareness, she quickly remembered Summit Lake – a “forgotten hidden gem of Akron” as she called it – a place she didn’t know existed until she worked at Summit Metro Parks.

“It’s in a more low-income neighborhood and it’s very divided and slightly segregated,” she explained. “The east side of the lake is predominantly black families, and the west side of the lake is predominantly white families who live in homes versus the east side, which is low-income housing. It just so happens that the way that the wind and the water currents flow, all the trash is on the east side, so it makes them look bad, making it seem like they don’t care about their area, but that’s just where the trash ends up. There’s a lack of resources there, so I took it upon myself after having worked there for so long that I was going to initiate cleanups. I’ve stuck with it ever since.”

Green Girl Gang’s Summit Lake clean-up was sponsored by the brewery where Daring works, Missing Mountain Brewing Company, and Keep Akron Beautiful – both of which donated project supplies. Daring has worked to collect and weigh all the trash pulled out of the Lake and gather all of the data to put toward her senior project.

Knowing that Summit Lake needed a positive media spotlight, Daring was thrilled when WEWS News 5 Cleveland found the Green Girl Gang on Instagram and asked to cover the project. Daring herself was interviewed.

Ready to fly

On May 14, after five years, Daring will finally spread her wings. She will be the first in her family to graduate from college – a feat she is extremely proud of after being a full-time student working two to three jobs.

She also earned the departmental award for environmental studies, an honor given to her by her professors.

“It adds a piece of completion to my life, and I’m like ‘Yes! I did that!’ I’m an adult college student, and there’s nothing wrong with that,” she explained. “It feels good.”

After graduation, she will return to Summit Metro Parks, this time for her dream job as a seasonal park biologist in the Conservation Department. After a required 90-day hiatus, Daring will be rehired to the position for the winter season.

“I am beyond stoked to work at this place, she said. “It’s the department I want to work in. I’m doing the things I want to do. And I’m meeting people I want to meet.”

And if that’s not enough for major life changes, Daring just bought a house. Her grandma’s house, in fact. A place that, other than Daring’s beloved great outdoors, feels like home.

As expected, this new homeowner plans to practice what she preaches to help the environment – wherever and whenever.

“I use bees wrap instead of plastic wrap. I use reusable Ziploc bags instead of disposable ones. I use paper bags instead of plastic bags. I use reusable straws, reusable utensils, reusable shopping bags. I try to make sure the lights are off when no one’s in the room,” she said. “I’ll have composting outside at home. I’ll have my rain barrels to help water my gardens.”

When the sun sets over the little Stow neighborhood, she’ll have all the time she wants to chase the lightning bugs that dot the night sky, or scoop up caterpillars that are ready for the next leg of the journey. It’s one that requires a little bit of time, but, as Daring knows, it is worth the effort:

She’s ready to fly.


Jennifer Daring featured on WEWS News.

Spring 2021 Commencement at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium
Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Hector McDaniel, president of Stark County NAACP, to give keynote address.

Hector McDanielKent State University at Stark graduates are set to take Canton’s biggest stage May 14 during an in-person commencement ceremony at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium.

View Commencement Ceremony Website
Stark County’s only public university is honored to celebrate its newest graduates and mark the return of an in-person commencement – the first since December 2019.

“We are the county’s Hometown University, and we are happy to commemorate the occasion in a special way – in a landmark that’s synonymous with our region,” said Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., Kent State Stark’s dean and chief administrative officer. “During a year marred by so much uncertainty, our students have counted on Kent State University at Stark’s commitment to academic excellence. We’ve delivered on that promise.”

Nearly 150 graduates have confirmed their participation in the in-person commencement ceremony. In total, more than 700 degrees will be conferred this spring, consisting of associate and bachelor’s degrees, and two Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) degrees. 

Across the university, the Kent State alumni family will grow by more than 5,000 new graduates as the university celebrates the accomplishments of its Spring Class of 2021, which will be recognized with in-person, outdoor commencement ceremonies all next week, along with a virtual commencement ceremony. 

Hector C. McDaniel, president of the Stark County NAACP, will present the keynote address at the Stark Campus commencement ceremony. During his speech, entitled “From Generation Next to Generation Now”, McDaniel is set to inspire this group of leaders to apply their world-class education to fuel positive change in their local communities.

“This is the Kent State University Class of 2021, but their degrees extend far beyond that title,” said McDaniel, M.Ed. ’14, a Kent State University alumnus. “These graduates are the gamechangers and the world needs them. Their time is now.”

As newly elected president of Stark County NAACP, one of McDaniel’s goals is to engage and support youth, while instilling a sense of civic and social responsibility. Also, a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces, McDaniel has dedicated time to working with veterans, helping them achieve academic success and support. In 2016, he helped welcome Kent State Stark’s William G. Bittle Veterans Commons to the campus.  

Currently pastor of outreach ministry at Union Baptist Church in Canton, McDaniel previously served as a rehabilitation counselor for the Veterans Affairs outpatient clinic in Canton, where he coordinated community outreach for mental health, addiction, homelessness and justice system issues. McDaniel also helped establish the Stark County Fatherhood Coalition and has served as a mentor for Men’s Challenge.

Kent State Stark’s invitation-only commencement will be livestreamed on Facebook @KentStateStark, beginning at 4 p.m. May 14. 
 

SPRING 2021 COMMMENCEMENT PHOTOS          SPRING 2021 NURSING CONVOCATION PHOTOS

 

Leah Miller
Monday, May 10, 2021

While other Copley High School students went to Friday night football games and dreamed about prom, Leah Miller had her sights set on what lay ahead. 

In both middle and high school, Miller took advanced courses. By the time she completed her sophomore year, she had earned nearly all her high school credits, setting her up perfectly to begin College Credit Plus (CCP), a program designed to allow college-ready students, who qualify for college admission, the opportunity to earn college credits.

Miller’s interest was piqued by CCP when her older brother participated in the program as a high school senior. Plus, she just really wasn’t into the whole high school scene.

In fact, her junior and senior years weren’t spent at Copley High School at all. She wouldn’t set foot on her high school campus again. 

Enter Kent State University at Stark.

 “I had gotten my license when I turned 16 in March,” said Miller. “Then, I started at Kent State Stark that August.”

Just a high school junior, Miller experienced quite the transition to college life.

 “It was definitely nerve-racking. I had an idea going into it that college classes would be harder than high school,” she acknowledged. “The classes themselves weren’t horrible… I was in honors classes, AP classes (in high school), so I would say they were about the same difficulty-wise and time- management-wise. 

But it was different. 

“You only met twice a week,” Miller explained. “You (met) for an hour instead of 40 minutes every day, so just adjusting to it was a bit different, but I’m so glad that I did it.”

Fridays are for opportunities

Since she was a full-time CCP student at Kent State Stark, Miller didn’t have any classes on Fridays. But being the overachiever and big-hearted person she is, she chose to volunteer at Akron Children’s Hospital during that free time.

While at Akron Children’s, she ran errands and visited with children in different units. She took families back to see their children post-procedure in Outpatient Surgery and helped discharge patients. 

“My favorite was the holiday season when we wrapped presents and put together bags for the patients with about three presents, a blanket, stuffed animal and coloring book,” said Miller. “We then passed them out with Santa on Christmas Eve.”

Miller walked in the Copley High School graduation in Spring 2018 with 58 college credits – nearly the equivalent to that of a college junior – and hundreds of volunteer hours under her belt. And, though she considered transferring to the Kent Campus, she remained at Kent State Stark, bound and determined to get into the rigorous, world-class nursing program. 

But getting into the program wouldn’t be an issue. She graduated with a 4.0 GPA, and had already taken the Introduction to Nursing course with Kent State Stark’s Cherie Mountain, M.S.N., R.N.-B.C., while still in high school.

‘Healthcare and children’

Although Miller loved every one of her nursing classes, she was specifically taken by a half-semester pediatrics course entitled, “Healthcare and Children”.

“Growing up, I never had younger siblings, but I had always known I wanted to work with kids. I just wasn’t sure to what capacity,” she said. “My first job was a swim lessons instructor, and I was level two and below – so the young kids – and it was such a fun time helping those kids learn how to swim.”

With the “Healthcare and Children” course, there was a clinical held at a place happily familiar – thanks to her volunteering experience.

“We were at Akron Children’s on the hematology/oncology floor… so, that was super nice to be able to see what it was and reinforce that, yes, that’s what I wanted to do,” Miller explained.

She was inspired by the children she worked with – their grit and outlook on life.

“These kids – obviously, no kid wants to be at a hospital – but they really try to make the best out of the situation,” added Miller. “They may be hospitalized and unable to leave their bed, but they’re still wanting to play games and they’re still wanting to help you do whatever you’re doing.”

Landing her dream job

Miller always dreamed about moving somewhere warm. Winters were rough growing up. There were too many birthdays, holidays and special moments her father, who worked for the city,  had to miss because he would be called in whenever it snowed. 

While job searching, an opportunity arose in Durham, North Carolina. It seemed too good to be true.

“I was just looking and looking, and out of the blue one night, I looked at Duke University, and I saw that they had (an opening for a) pediatric bone marrow transplant nurse for a new graduate,” said Miller. 

She went back and forth on whether to apply or not. But what would she have to lose?

“I applied on a whim,” Miller said.

And the following Tuesday, Duke University Hospital requested an interview.

“We had the interview scheduled for that Friday, and then a week-and-a-half later they called and offered me the job,” she said. “So, it was such a quick experience. I never thought it would happen that fast!”

The first person in her family to enter the medical field, Miller and her family visited the hospital over spring break, further solidifying her decision to take the leap and make her dream a reality. 

“It’s exactly what I want to be in. I wanted to be in pediatric oncology in some aspect, and pediatric bone marrow transplant seems like the perfect fit,” she said.

The day after Kent State Stark’s Nursing Convocation, at just 21 years old, Miller will move to North Carolina and begin working at the hospital in July. 

A stepping stone

Miller made the most of her time at Kent State Stark. She worked for two years as the Nursing Lab’s student assistant and represented S.C.R.U.B.S. as the student organization president. Her face is a familiar and friendly one on campus.

In addition to her peers, Miller has made great connections with the nursing faculty, who have nothing but good things to say about her and her work ethic. 

“Leah is the epitome of integrity, professionalism and hard work,” said Chrissy Kauth, R.N., Ph.D., professor of nursing. “She has been nothing less than amazing as a student. I know, without a doubt, she will be a professional, competent and caring nurse that will do great things in our profession!”

It’s fitting that this year, nursing faculty chose Miller as the Academic Achievement Departmental Award winner.

As the icing on the cake, thanks to the CCP program, scholarships, Kent State Stark’s affordable tuition and the hard work of Miller and her parents, she will graduate a debt-free Flash.

Unsurprisingly, Miller is already looking past graduation and onto what’s next. 

“It will be a stepping stone,” she explained. “You went through college – that was a stepping stone. You’re graduating, going into that next phase of your life. And then it’s NCLEX, job and moving all in a row! So, it’s just a great progression. It shows where you’ve come from, where you are currently and then where you’re gonna go.”

And we can already tell she’s “gonna go” far.
 

2021 Staff Excellence Award Recipients
Thursday, May 06, 2021

The 2021 Staff Excellence Awards celebrated shining examples of dedication to students and the campus community during a year eclipsed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

On April 30, nominees gathered at the Conference Center for a small ceremony, also broadcast live on the Teams platform.

“You have worked diligently to ensure our campus has not only survived – but thrived – during a global pandemic,” said Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., dean and chief administrative officer at Kent State University at Stark. “We eagerly look forward to a fall 2021 semester in which students will be, once again, traversing our campus…and our staff – who so often quietly support this institution’s success behind the scenes – will get to interact with students and see the lives we impact every day.” 

Seachrist said she was honored to announce this year’s Staff Excellence Award recipients: Rob Kairis, administrator of the year; and Mary Shank, staff member of the year.

“Rob and Mary have gone above and beyond during the global pandemic to ensure they could do everything within their power to help locally,” Seachrist said. “And both share a common characteristic: putting the needs of others before their own.”

Kairis, director of the Library, was nominated for the award by his entire library staff. In their nomination of Kairis, they wrote: “Rob always has the staff’s best interest at heart, while still providing excellent service to the campus community. He is a team player and would never ask any staff member to do something that he would not do himself.”

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Kairis quickly pivoted from offering in-person to remote services to ensure the safety of faculty, staff and students, while guaranteeing the great academic work of the campus continued. That’s not to mention this innovator even took it upon himself to print face shields and mask extenders with the library’s 3-D printer to provide extra PPE for the entire campus community.

Shank, a clerical specialist in the Academic Success Center, was described as the type of support person who makes the jobs of others easier. Her work and dedication go above and beyond her classification.

Said one nominator, “She is ready and willing to help students and other staff members in any way she can – she’s even willing to change her schedule. Especially during the pandemic, Mary offered to shift her daily schedule to cover various hours during the day, depending on the needs of students. Rather than saying no, she prioritizes students first – without question.”

Shank was described as a kind, friendly and welcoming face for struggling students – who, oftentimes, are experiencing anxiety and uncertainty when she sees them. Shank helps calm their fears – and relays the message: Kent State Stark is here to help you succeed.

This year’s Staff Excellence Selection Committee was led by 2020 Staff Excellence Award winners Darcy McBride and Mike Shipe and included: Jessica Anderson, Lyndy Beckley, Paul Bagavandoss, Shaan Fowler, Theresa Huber, Jayne Moneysmith, Thomas Norton-Smith and Jay Sloan.

Groundwater Well Field
Monday, May 03, 2021

It’s a sunny spring day at Kent State University at Stark – the perfect day to install an educational groundwater well field behind the campus’ Pond & Wetlands Research Area. And while contractors dig deep, science faculty know the groundbreaking will have an impact that’s limitless: real-world learning through hands-on experience.

Near the drilling site, Eric Taylor, Ph.D., associate professor of geology, and Carrie Schweitzer, Ph.D., professor of geology, watch eagerly. This moment is one they’ve been looking forward to for years.

Tradesmen from Ohio Testbor, Inc. – contracted by Terracon Consultants, Inc., a construction engineering firm from Parma, Ohio – begin their work. The team uses a drill rig to dig six to seven wells, each between 10 and 20 feet deep. For two of the wells, the bottom 10 feet will include a perforated PVC pipe surrounded by packed sand to filter water flow – a new source for new educational opportunities in Kent State Stark’s science department.

This is the first time Terracon’s Cleveland location has partnered with a university on an educational project – something they’ve wanted to do for a long time.

“We’re very proud to be a part of this,” said Chett Siefring, P.E., department manager of Geotechnical Services at Terracon. “I personally, and I know the company, too, finds this greatly educational. Anything to advance the educational side of this is fantastic.”

Made possible by a $14,190 grant from the Dominion Energy Charitable Foundation and the partnership with Terracon, the well field will be used in conjunction with the start of a new Kent State Stark course – Water and the Environment.

“Through Dominion Energy’s Environmental Education and Stewardship Program, we are proud to award funding to Kent State Stark’s Water Resources Initiative,” said Tracy Oliver, Dominion Energy’s director of media and local affairs. “This program combines environmental educational opportunities for university students, K-12 students and the public.

“Kent State Stark’s leadership and unique position to lead sustainability and water quality projects should be applauded,” added Oliver. “Supporting innovative organizations that improve the environment and provide educational experiences in the communities served by Dominion Energy is core to our business.”

Real-world skills and experience

The new class will be an introductory course to any of the science majors, but it will be of particular interest to students in geology, geography, environmental studies and biology paths, faculty explained.

“I’ve wanted to do this many years ago,” said Taylor. “But… timing. It’s all about timing.”

And, the timing was finally right when Kent State University anthropology and geology alumnus, Daniel Pratt, P.E., P.G., spoke to a geology career class at the Stark Campus. Pratt, who, at the time, worked at Terracon, suggested the well field partnership and was instrumental in getting the project rolling – or in this case, drilling.

So, what will happen once the wells are installed?

“It’s as simple as watching water flow,” said Taylor.

Taylor and Schweitzer explained that students will garner first-hand experience monitoring groundwater, how the levels change throughout the seasons and how the water drops when pumped then discharged. They will be able to test the water from the wells to look at water quality and make comparisons to the water in the nearby pond.

“The broader perspective is that employers want students to have skills and experience,” said Taylor. “We really want to offer our students the opportunity to learn a skill and develop that. By installing the well field, we have the ability to let the students gain practical experience in something that they’ll do down the road.”

“We’re so excited,” added Schweitzer. “The teaching is going to be invaluable because this is what you do as a geologist.”

Enhanced learning opportunities – from ground up

During the drilling process, soil samples are taken every few feet for students to study and analyze in class.

Maxwell Purses, a junior attending both the Kent and Stark Campuses, is already benefiting from the ground breaking. A 2018 Perry High School graduate, Purses is currently working on a project in his Sedimentology and Stratigraphy class at the Kent Campus focusing on glacial events.

“We have to talk about them – when they happened, proof that they happened, comparing two different areas where it shows evidence of it happening and why that evidence correlates with it. I’m using the last glacial maximum, which is a glaciation event that happened recently, about 12,000 year ago. The sediments in this correlate with that,” Purses said, referring to the box full of preserved and labeled samples gathered near the drilling site. “When the glaciers were covering Ohio, they left a bunch of coarse sediments – like this here (pointing to the collection) – so I can use that to prove evidence. And if I compare it to another area, then it works together quite well.”

Amanda Cox, a senior environmental studies student stopped by to watch the drilling process and immediately made the connection.

“I think any opportunities that students have to see things in person and hands-on enhances their education,” said Cox. “You can read stuff out of a book, but to actually see it happen, sometimes visually it makes more sense.”

And isn’t it true that when dreamers have the resources to do, they do more and go further than ever before? Some might even say the sky’s the limit; but geologists know being grounded is where you grow.

Appreciative Curiosity
Appreciative Curiosity
Wednesday, March 31, 2021

It’s close to midterm time for Kent State University at Stark students in the now-online survey course Introduction to World Religions. 

Today, Rabbi Joshua Brown from Akron’s Temple Israel is a guest speaker. Students log in to class prepared with some academic knowledge of Judaism taught by adjunct professor Timothy Temerson. A former pastor at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Akron, Temerson now teaches the course virtually from his home in Charlottesville, Virginia. He covers as much as possible, including the Torah’s kosher laws. Practicing Jews are not supposed to consume a dairy product and meat at the same time. 

Rabbi Brown opens his time by giving students the chance to ask questions – any questions. One student turns on his camera and microphone to ask a rather pressing one: “Rabbi, what do you do when you get a craving for a bacon cheeseburger?”

Rabbi Brown chuckles, responding openly and honestly, knowing that when it comes to world religions, most students are a blank slate. 

The addition of guest speakers, particularly to the virtual classroom, has been an invaluable and welcome change of pace for students, many of whom have been learning remotely since March 2020 when coronavirus (COVID-19) shutdowns began.

‘Appreciative curiosity’

Temerson’s class covers seven different world religions. For five of them – Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Christianity – Temerson usually invites a clergy member from each tradition to host a class Q&A session. 

“It’s a really unique opportunity for the students not just to hear about a tradition from me, from the instructor, but to actually have some time to dialogue with a faith leader or member of that tradition,” said Temerson. “I think that just makes the experience so much richer for the students, so that they’re not just reading about it in a book, not just getting PowerPoint slides from the professor or watching a video. They can have an opportunity to talk to a rabbi, talk to a Buddhist priest, talk to an imam. It’s pretty cool.”

Guest speakers provide a chance for students to learn about an unfamiliar topic from an expert – all within a safe space. This fits in perfectly with Temerson’s “appreciative curiosity” class philosophy. 

“I just try to really create a space where students can just be curious and ask questions and learn and not have to worry about who’s got the final answer, who’s got the absolute truth,” Temerson said. “We’re there to learn together, and we are there to take a journey together.”

Speakers are encouraged to share their own personal stories and experiences with their tradition.

“I think what we want our students to be able to do is connect with the real world, so if the speaker can bring in a real-world experience, I think that’s always more engaging,” said Rabbi Brown. “When speakers are at their best, they tell more of their own personal story and they’re giving you their experiences. That’s the value of it – you’re getting their experience as opposed to knowledge.” 

Advantageous to all

Dale Seeds, Ph.D., adjunct professor and husband of recently retired professor of music, Laurel Seeds, has adopted a similar approach with guest speakers in his Theatre Fundamentals II course. For a course that is normally very hands-on, bringing in guests to fill in some of those gaps was a no-brainer.

“They bring in other areas of expertise and different perspectives that broaden the scope of the material covered in the class,” said Seeds. “It also enriches our understanding of who these authorities are, where race, gender and culture have been historically marginalized.”

This semester, Theatre Fundamentals II, which is co-taught by Loren “Coco” Mayer, focuses on Asian- American playwright David Henry Wang’s “MButterfly”, which Seeds explained is “a script that offers a non-western view on gender, culture, politics and history with rich visual possibilities for costumes, lighting and projections designs for student projects.”

The course has included two guest speakers, Yining Lin, Ph.D., an expert on Asian and Asian-American theatre and Megan Wanderer, a Kent State Stark alumna who is a freelance visual artist and projection designer. 

The student-to-guest-speaker relationship has proven to be mutually advantageous.

“We had a nice discussion and exchange of ideas at the end of the presentation,” said Wanderer of her guest-speaking experience. “For example, a fashion major and I chatted about the use of my projections in runway shows – how fun! I think it was creatively beneficial for all of us.”

Creating opportunities

In Temerson’s class, even pre-pandemic and in-person, guest speakers were a keystone to the course. Now that most courses are online or remote, it seems the impact is even greater. 

LaKaleb Bowen, a McKinley High School senior in Kent State Stark’s College Credit Plus (CCP) program has noticed the difference in Temerson’s class.

“In my other classes, participation is dwindling, yet our class with Mr. Temerson has remained engaged,” said Bowen, “Simply put, when communication is limited and distanced like this, there needs to be some way to keep the class dynamic as opposed to the static that is commonplace. Mr. Temerson has done exactly that by keeping us in anticipation of meeting someone new, an expert on the subject who will bring in the information and the social variety we need in the classroom.”

Seeds echoed Bowen’s statements, emphasizing the importance of being exposed to other worldviews. 

“Under our current remote circumstances, guest speakers connect us to the world beyond the classroom and inspire us with examples of how artists and scholars continue to explore, expand and create within their fields,” Seeds said.

In so many ways, experiencing a topic through someone else’s eyes can solidify and enliven understanding, help otherwise marginalized voices to be heard and provide unique learning opportunities.
 
“It’s such a good opportunity for students to, in some ways, cross a boundary that they might not otherwise cross, not because they’re biased, they just wouldn’t have the opportunity, and I think that this class with the speakers creates that opportunity for them,” said Temerson. “That’s the thing that I really feel is, in some ways, the most important thing that I do as a teacher – to give them the opportunity to have that experience of crossing a boundary and have the chance to have an encounter that’s open-minded, that’s guided by this appreciative curiosity.”

Guitar Weekend April 7-9, 2021
Monday, March 29, 2021

Guitar Weekend celebrates of all styles of guitar playing and features some of the most exciting guitarists in the world. 

Organized by Kent State Stark’s Music Department, Guitar Weekend features virtual Q&As and live performances hosted by Facebook Live.

All events are during Eastern Standard Time.
 

GUITAR WEEKEND SCHEDULE

 
YVETTE YOUNG
Wednesday, April 7, 2021

Kick-off Kent State Stark’s Guitar Weekend with a Q&A and live performance by Covet leader and math-rock innovator, Yvette Young. This talented California musician is a fascinating player, creating multi-layered, cosmic sounds with her unique, two-handed tapping technique.

 
BILL FRISELL
Thursday, April 8, 2021

Bill Frisell is a living legend. His career as a guitarist and composer has spanned more than 50 years and many celebrated recordings, whose catalog has been cited by Downbeat as "the best-recorded output of the decade." The breadth of such performing and recording situations is a testament not only to his singular guitar conception, but his musical versatility as well.

 
MARK LETTIERI
Friday, April 9, 2021

Mark Lettieri is a guitarist, composer, producer, and instructor based in Fort Worth, TX. Proficient in a multitude of styles, he records and performs in virtually every genre of popular music with both independent and major-label artists. He also composes and produces original instrumental music under his own name. Lettieri joined jazz/world group Snarky Puppy in 2008, where he contributes as guitarist, arranger and composer. 
 

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE GUITARISTS FEATURED AT GUITAR WEEKEND

Direct questions to:

Erin Vaughn, M.A.
Lecturer of Music
evaughn1@kent.edu
330-244-3361

Virtual Music Technology Preview on Oct. 23
Monday, March 29, 2021

Turn your passion into your profession. Discover a career in music production and audio recording.

Kent State University at Stark offers a complete four-year curriculum in music technology. This program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music and is only offered at Kent State Stark.

Spend some time with us to learn more about the music technology program!

VIRTUAL MUSIC TECHNOLOGY PREVIEW
FRIDAY, APRIL 23
3 - 5 P.M.

During our virtual Music Technology Preview, you'll

  • Review the admissions and advising process, and learn more about Kent State Stark
  • Talk shop with our highly-qualified music faculty
  • Discuss the program and internships with current music tech students
  • Take a virtual tour of the state-of-the-art audio and recording studios

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION
You'll receive instructions on how to access the virtual event before April 23, so be sure to check your email.


CONTACT

Cindy Deng
Admissions Counselor
330-244-3238
cdeng@kent.edu

 

Kent State Stark to host the 2021 Stark County Heart Walk on Sept. 18
Thursday, March 25, 2021

Kent State University at Stark is honored to host the 2021 Stark County Heart Walk on the campus Saturday, Sept. 18. At this time, the Stark Campus is hopeful the event will be in-person, but regardless of status, the Stark Heart Walk will certainly meet its No. 1 goal: Raising awareness of heart disease.

Dean Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., has been named to the Stark Heart Walk’s Executive Leadership Team. She said being a part of this year’s event is meaningful professionally – and personally.

“By participating in this walk, you may be helping a friend or a colleague, who has an issue now, or may have an issue in the future,” she said. “Others may want to get involved for their own health’s sake. We are all so connected in life, your actions could be saving the life of someone you know and care about.”

Seachrist’s family has battled heart issues for generations. One cousin, Susan, died after a third open heart surgery at the age of 20. And Seachrist’s father, Glen, died from rheumatic heart disease when Seachrist was only 4 years old. Read the dean’s full story.

“There are so many reasons to participate in activities that generate awareness about heart disease and its many causes – whether heart issues run in your family, or not,” Seachrist said. “You may be saving a life.”

As the county’s public university, Kent State Stark provides a quality university education that works to positively impact the region in several ways. Promoting physical activity, health and wellness goes hand-in-hand with moving the community forward.

Find out more about the Heart Walk today and join the campus’ team, which will continue to add to its membership throughout the summer.

Kent State Stark is the proud host of the 2021 Stark County Heart Walk on Sept. 18.
Friday, March 19, 2021

Kent State Stark is proud to host the 2021 Stark County Heart Walk on Sept. 18.

Susan Seachrist lived for just two decades, but during that time, she inspired a community to come together to provide another chance at life. And while she died during her third open heart surgery in 1962, Susan’s memory lives on.

Today, Dean Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., will help lead the 2021 Stark County Heart Walk as part of its Executive Leadership Team. She walks for cousin Susan, and many others in her family, including her father, who died from rheumatic heart disease when Seachrist was just 4 years old. She also walks for her brother, a heart attack survivor.

“Heart disease can go undetected. People may have high cholesterol without even knowing it, and high blood pressure is known as the silent killer,” Seachrist explained. “There are so many reasons to participate in activities that generate awareness about heart disease and its many causes – whether heart issues run in your family, or not. You may be saving a life.”

As the county’s public university, Kent State University at Stark provides a quality university education that works to positively impact the region in a number of ways. Promoting physical activity, health and wellness goes hand-in-hand with moving the community forward.

The 2021 Stark Heart Walk will take place Saturday, Sept. 18, at the campus. Find out more about the Heart Walk and join a team.

Seachrist is happy to lead the campus’ team, which will continue to add to its membership throughout the summer.

“By participating in this walk, you may be helping a friend or a colleague, who has an issue now, or may have an issue in the future,” she said. “Others may want to get involved for their own health’s sake. We are all so connected in life, your actions could be saving the life of someone you know and care about.”

Family ties

The New Waterford community in rural Columbiana County rallied around the Seachrist family in 1962. Many boarded a Greyhound bus to make their way from the small farming community to the big city –Cleveland. There, they gave blood at the Cleveland Clinic, where Susan Seachrist underwent surgery. 

“This was significant for community members to travel for Susan,” the dean explained. “And even though Susan did not survive, it demonstrates the collective care we should all have for one another.”

Heart issues have always plagued the Seachrist side of the dean’s family. While her brother, Daniel, survived his heart attack and is now 73, her father, Glen, died when he was just 39.

Triggered by a susceptibility to rheumatic fever, the heart issues experienced by Seachrist’s father and paternal grandmother, along with her cousin Susan, all resulted from rheumatic heart disease.

“My dad helped my grandfather raise three younger children after his mother died of rheumatic heart disease at age 42,” Seachrist said. “My father was just 13 at the time of his mother’s death. He was athletic, he played ball and worked very hard. When he became sick with rheumatic fever, he didn’t even realize it – and that affected his heart.”

Another cousin, who survived two tours in Vietnam, later died of a heart attack at 48.

Trials and triumphs

And Seachrist has had her own trials. Despite her mother’s best efforts to keep a young Denise free of strep-throat infections that can lead to rheumatic fever and heart damage, Seachrist became ill when she was a teen.

While the disease was treated before it caused permanent damage, it meant being sidelined during much of her high school years. While Seachrist’s heart healed, she was prevented from taking part in physical activities, like basketball, although she still snuck in a few hoops when she could. But this musical talent, who would go on to major in vocal performance and minor in piano at Heidelberg College, performed in the marching band.

In her 50s, Seachrist developed a passion for running, completing one especially memorable marathon with her late husband, Charlie Wentz, in Dublin, Ireland. It’s a pastime Seachrist still enjoys today.

“How fortunate I was,” stated Seachrist, reflecting on her family’s lot.

She was only 2 when Susan died and was sometimes called “Susan” growing up in honor – and memory – of her cousin. She didn’t mind.

“People knew the story,” Seachrist said. “And Susan was very musical, too. She used to sing duets with her father. When I think about Susan, I think about all of these opportunities, all of this life she was not able to experience. She had a bright future ahead of her.”

So, Seachrist walks in September for her family, for Susan and the others, but also for those she’s never met.

“You do not know when you, or someone you love, may need the American Heart Association,” Seachrist said. “So, it’s important to get involved and provide another chance at life.”


Above photo:

Left: Susan Seachrist was just 20 when she died during her third open heart surgery in 1962.

Center: Susan Seachrist (center) and her siblings, Wayne and Leslie (left), were double cousins to Dean Denise A. Seachrist and her brother, Daniel (right). The children were considered double cousins because the Rapp sisters of Columbiana County married Seachrist brothers.

Right: Community members from New Waterford, Ohio, in Columbiana County traveled by bus to the Cleveland Clinic to donate blood for Susan’s final surgery.   

A message from the Dean
A message from the Dean
Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

 
Today, we reflect on an anniversary that, just one year ago, seemed unimaginable. Yet, somehow, we have arrived at this notable milestone.  
 
Beginning at 5 p.m. March 16, 2020, our campus shifted to a largely remote working and learning environment as COVID-19 swept our community, our state, and our country, into the throes of a pandemic our world hadn’t experienced in more than 100 years.
 
We turned on a dime. Kitchen counters and dining room tables substituted for office spaces as we rallied to provide our students with the world-class education they have come to expect from their Hometown University.  
 
I eagerly and naively looked forward to getting back to campus, even considering a “Welcome Back” picnic in the fall.  
 
But September arrived, and we still faced the same silent enemy.
 
We fought back with face coverings, physical distancing, and frequent handwashing.  
 
We’ve learned to give ourselves, and each other, grace.  
 
We’ve learned to trust.  
 
We’ve learned to hope.
 
And, today, we stand cautiously optimistic that the worst of the pandemic is behind us.
 
Still, some of you continued to work on campus at times during this past year to meet the needs of students and our campus community. We are forever grateful that: 

  • Our security, facilities, and grounds crews kept us safe and our property pristine.
  • Our Student Services team rotated their schedules to ensure students’ needs were met.
  • Our library staff manned the building, despite the risks, because we know access to knowledge holds the key to academic advancement.
  • Our Network Services and Instructional Designer Katie Baer conquered the monumental task of ensuring our faculty had the assistance they needed to turn entire courses remote in a matter of days. Our employees were equipped with the technology they needed to do the job at home as well. Our computer labs remained open to assist students with their technology needs.
  • Last but not least, our dedicated faculty continued to offer our students a high-quality Kent State University education that, for some academic disciplines, meant continuing to hold in-person sessions.

I could go on.  I am just so proud of the work we’ve accomplished over the past year.

Now, we prepare to enter a new academic year full of hope, after achieving a record-setting enrollment this spring.
 
I am eager to speak with all of you soon. Faculty, we’ll meet on March 26 for our Spring Full Faculty Meeting. For staff, we’ll meet April 9. Both of these meetings are scheduled in Teams; check your email for more details.
 
As always, transparency is my goal, and we’ll continue to navigate these unchartered waters together with excellence in education serving as our North Star, flexibility as our guiding light, and kindness as our creed.

Again, I could not be more proud of our team here at Kent State Stark.  I leave you with some snapshots of our truly incredible, remarkable year.

Covid Collage, a year in review
 

Sincerely,

Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Stark


 

Computer Science Information Session
Computer Science Information Session
Tuesday, March 09, 2021

People, program, spaces...that's really what you are looking at when you are exploring a major.

During this virtual event, learn about our computer science program from faculty and take a virtual tour to see our classrooms and labs.

Computer Science Information Session
Wednesday, March 24, 2021
5-6 p.m. via Zoom
 

REGISTER TODAY
A personalized Zoom link will be sent to you after you register for the event.

If you can't make it, please still register! We will send you a recording after the event.


CONTACT

Office of Admissions
starkadmissions@kent.edu
330-244-3251

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE KENT STATE STARK COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM

Last Dollar Scholarship and North Canton Medical Foundation team up to support nursing students
Thursday, March 04, 2021

Thirteen Kent State University at Stark nursing students recently received money toward their schooling, thanks to the North Canton Medical Foundation (NCMF) and the Last Dollar Scholarship fund.

The NCMF provided $5,000 in COVID-19 relief funds for nursing students struggling financially as a result of the pandemic. To identify need, students were asked to submit an essay application describing the financial challenges they have experienced due to the pandemic.

“After reviewing their applications, it was evident that nearly all of the circumstances described were the same,” said Andrea Dale, Kent State Stark financial aid coordinator.

Dale’s quick thinking led to nine students being awarded the NCMF scholarship and the remaining four were awarded the Last Dollar Scholarship.

“We were able to change 13 students’ lives,” said Dale, “and I have heard back from nearly all of them expressing their gratitude. This was a team effort from multiple areas on campus.”


SUPPORT THE CAMPUS

Dr. Denise A. Seachrist and Dr. Robert D. Sturr, deans at Kent State University at Stark
Thursday, March 04, 2021

After school, the behemoth of a piano loomed large, yet its black and white ivories still called to the little girl whose feet could barely reach its pedals. And for the boy who grew up in a household brimming with books, burying his nose in them set the tone early: never stop learning. 

While their backgrounds are as varied as the ways they’ve chosen to give, for two Kent State University at Stark deans, giving to the campus means leaving a legacy etched by education – and an intent. That these dollars will provide for the kind of hope that prompts the first step toward a new tomorrow. 

Dean Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., and Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs Robert D. Sturr, Ph.D., are both administrators at the Stark Campus, but they have chosen different methods of giving. And there’s a myriad of approaches to giving that are just as unique as individual donors, said Beth Fuciu, associate director of Philanthropy and Alumni Engagement.

“There are so many ways to give. For some, they give now. Such gifts often come by way of payroll deductions and one-time funds directed toward current student scholarships,” Fuciu said. “And then, there are endowments that begin after you pass, helping future students. These planned gifts often honor loved ones, leaving a legacy.”

Seachrist gives in honor of her late husband, Charles P. Wentz. Sturr gives to honor his late parents, George B.T. Sturr and Dr. Angela R. Young. 

While Seachrist’s contributions are planned gifts, Sturr’s are current scholarships. 

“This demonstrates how donors can give in ways that are most impactful to them and how your assets can truly work for you,” Fuciu said. 

Neither Seachrist nor Sturr are strangers to giving, contributing throughout the years: Seachrist donated to the Fine Arts Building renovation and is the namesake of a practice room in the building; Sturr has enrolled in payroll deductions to give to the campus’ Last Dollar Scholarship fund.  

‘You need a Steinway’

Seachrist is a proud product of the Kent State University School of Music, graduating with her Ph.D. and going on to become the school’s director. 

“If it hadn’t been for the education that I received at the School of Music, I wouldn’t be where I am today,” she explained. And her career has run the gamut – from student, faculty, administrator and director to dean of Kent State Stark. 

Seachrist, who minored in piano and majored in vocal performance, grew up playing an enormous, 19th century piano – one that engulfed an entire wall of her family’s Columbiana County home. 

When Seachrist was in high school, her mother surprised her with a welcomed gift for which she had been saving: a Baldwin piano. Sure, it did the job, but when Seachrist and Charlie had the opportunity to visit a Steinway & Sons piano gallery, shortly after the Kent School of Music became an all-Steinway school, one of them was hooked. 

Surprisingly, it wasn’t the musician.

“Charlie said all along, ‘You need a Steinway,’ ” Seachrist said. 

And Charlie finally “wore me down,” Seachrist says with a laugh. The couple purchased a Steinway M Series player piano that caught the eye of the retired aerospace engineer. The player piano has many features, including video. “You can play right along with classical pianist Vladimir Horowitz,” Seachrist explained. “Charlie, being the engineer that he was, was fascinated with the technology. Plus, he could play it, too.”

And he did. Especially during times when Charlie was being treated for colon cancer, the player piano brought great joy. “That instrument is very, very special, and he got much enjoyment out of that piano,” Seachrist said.

The player piano will serve as the couple’s in-kind gift to the School of Music, which will also receive another gift that has fond memories attached.

Blossom Music Center was also very close to their hearts. Seachrist and Charlie, and some of their closest friends and family, would catch concerts there in the summer, complete with fireworks and fun.

“Charlie had a huge appreciation for music and, of course, music was my passion and vocation,” Seachrist said. 

That’s why it made sense to establish The Denise A. Seachrist and Charles P. Wentz Kent Blossom Music Festival Visiting Artist Series. The fund will be used to bring visiting artists to Kent Blossom Music Festival for annual performances and master classes.

A planned gift

Finally, Seachrist has established a planned gift, The Denise A. Seachrist and Charles P. Wentz Endowed Scholarship at Kent State Stark. 

“The community at Stark just welcomed us so much,” said Seachrist, adding that Stark County has always felt like home.

Her goal is to provide a scholarship opportunity with few restrictions. Seachrist, in fact, was the beneficiary of a very specific scholarship – that, in addition to the ones she’d already received – helped propel her undergraduate college career. Still, the scholarship hadn’t been given in the six years prior to her receiving it. 

“I happened to hit all the markers,” Seachrist said. “If you have money to give, you want to touch as many lives as you can. Sometimes, without meaning to, donors make their scholarships so restrictive that the money just sits. Gifts that can be used ensure we get to impact the lives that go on after ours.”

‘A better future tomorrow’

Sturr grew up in a house full of books, so it’s little surprise he would become an English professor. While his father, also a professor, died when Sturr was just 24 years old, his memory still greets Sturr in unexpected ways. 

“I’ll still come across his handwriting in books I now own that were once his,” Sturr explained. A turn of the page might reveal a thought his father once had about a text – providing for a shared idea even today. 

“Education mattered a lot to both my parents,” said Sturr, the youngest of seven and one of three who went on to a career in education. And while none of the Sturr children would go on to become a medical doctor, Sturr promised his mother he’d encourage any student who may be interested in studying a pre-med concentration – a requirement for the Dr. Angela R. Young Scholarship.  

“My parents felt it was important to attend school without carrying a lot of debt,” he said. “And while I know $1,000 scholarships aren’t a huge amount, I felt, if this could help a student work 20 hours a week instead of 30, my parents would be honored.”

After all, if either scholarship – in honor of Young or the George B.T. Sturr Scholarship, which is geared toward students in the humanities – provides students with the opportunity to focus on their growth – to enjoy learning for learning’s sake – then the goal is accomplished. 

Sturr targeted students with a 2.75 GPA for both scholarships. “I didn’t want students to feel they have to be a rock star, just that they are doing their best,” he said. “I hope students are still maybe finding themselves.

“Fortunately, you don’t have to have a chunk of money to make a difference,” added Sturr, who, along with his wife, have made donations to their alma maters. 

But the Stark Campus has been a part of Sturr’s life since the late 1990s, and for nearly 25 years students have taken his English courses to learn about literature and how words – and decisions – can make a powerful impact.

“By attending college,” he said, “you make the choice to encounter those hard choices: how to spend your money and your time today for a better future tomorrow.”

Forging ahead, together 

Like his father’s handwritten notes, Sturr hopes the scholarships will provide students with the opportunity to discover treasured moments.   

Seachrist finds her gifts as a way to ever connect the couple to the university – and each other.

It’s a way to pay forward the gift of an education that has meant so much. As the music plays on, the player piano that Charlie so appreciated, and may have gotten him through some of the darkest days of his cancer treatment, along with the love of music he and Seachrist shared will go on for a lifetime – and even longer.

“When I think about the connections we all have the opportunity to make here on this Earth, and that we get to have an effect on future generations, is just a wonderful, beautiful thing,” she said. 

Students are armed with the ability to dream, encouraged to take that first step, forging ahead toward a brighter tomorrow.

Because of Angela and George.

And Charlie.
 

SUPPORT THE CAMPUS
 

Support Rising Scholars at Kent State Stark
Thursday, March 04, 2021

The Kent State Stark Rising Scholars Program continues to thrive through the final stretch of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

But now, the need has never been greater to help Stark County youth move out of poverty toward a life of prosperity, explained Beth Fuciu, associate director of Philanthropy and Alumni Engagement.

The Rising Scholars Program is designed to give first-generation and underrepresented students a pathway to achieve a college degree at no cost to participants. But more funding is needed to continue changing students’ lives.

“This program can only continue with donations from local individuals, foundations and businesses,” Fuciu said. “If you have been thinking about making a donation, the time is now to make a real impact that can change the trajectory of lives right here in Stark County.”

Lester Sanders, academic program coordinator for Rising Scholars, said that, during the pandemic, students have continued to meet monthly via Google Meet, as a group and on an individual basis.

Seventy-four Stark County students are participating in the program, boasting a large freshman class of 30. The 2021-22 academic year promises to welcome another record-setting class, with 36 applicants from five local school districts.  

On campus or virtually, Rising Scholars are looking forward to the Summer Institute in June – with your help. 

SUPPORT RISING SCHOLARS AT KENT STATE STARK


RISING SCHOLARS AT KENT STATE STARK

Total number of participants: 74

  • 22 Seniors
  • 14 Juniors
  • 8 Sophomores
  • 30 Freshmen
  • 36 applicants for the 2021-22 academic year

Summer Institute: June 2021

  • Preparing for virtual and in-person options
  • Week of June 14: Freshmen
  • Week of June 21: Sophomores and Juniors
  • Week of June 28: Seniors

 

 

Women's History Month
Women's History Month
Monday, March 01, 2021

The Kent State Stark Women's History Committee will spotlight different, recognized women in fields like the arts, politics, science, sports and business every Wednesday in March on Kent State Stark's social media platforms.

 
Hedy Lamarr (1914-2000)Hedy Lamarr

In the 1930s and 40s, Hedy Lamarr was known as “the most beautiful woman in the world” and was an international star in the movie industry.  Born in Austria to Jewish parents, she left her German husband in the mid-1930s, traveled to the United States and began to make movies for what became MGM Studios. Her movie career lasted into the early 1950s. Her lasting contribution was not the silver screen, but rather the scientific work of creating and developing “frequency hopping,” which was designed to help prevent the jamming of radio signals on torpedoes used in World War II against the Nazis. The device provided a synchronization between the transmitter and receiver, while changing frequency to prevent interception. She worked with George Anthiel to develop a usable system that was patented in 1941.While not fully implemented until 1962, when technology caught up with their invention, the concept of frequency hopping became the foundation of today’s technology found in cell phones, WiFi, GPS and Bluetooth devices. Hedy, as a self-taught scientist, was awarded the Pioneer Award of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Although the US military and the communications industry acknowledges her contribution, Hedy LaMarr was never paid for the work or use of her invention. She died in 2000.
 
Resources:


Mary Cassatt (1844-1926)Mary Cassatt

Mary Cassatt was an American-born painter and printmaker. She grew up in Pennsylvania, but lived most of her life in France, where she practiced painting in the Impressionist form. Mary is best known for her depictions of the private lives of women, with many paintings showcasing the relationship between mother and child. In 1904, she was awarded the Legion d’honneur, the highest French order of merit, a testament to her influence in painting and printmaking. Near the end of her life, she became involved with women’s suffrage and exhibited works supporting the movement.
 
Resources:

  • "Mary Cassatt: Paintings and Prints" // by Frank Getlein
  • "The Graphic Art of Mary Cassatt" // Introd. by Adelyn D. Breeskin. Foreword by Donald H. Karshan
  • "The Artist was a Woman" // by Suzanne Bauman and Mary Bell
  • www.marycassatt.org
  • www.metmuseum.org
  • www.nga.gov

Ruth Bader Ginsberg (1933 – 2020)Ruth Bader Ginsberg

Ruth Bader Ginsberg, former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, was appointed by President Clinton in 1993 and served until her death in 2020. She attended Harvard Law School where she faced significant gender discrimination and a hostile environment. She became the first female tenured law professor at Columbia and was a director of Women’s Rights for American Civil Liberties Union in the 1970s. Throughout her tenure on the Supreme Court, she presented a strong voice on promoting gender equality. Her influence will continue to play a pivotal role in many controversial cases in the future.

Resources:


Madam C.J. Walker (1867-1919)Madam CJ Walker

Madam C.J. Walker is known today as one of the first African American women to become a millionaire, but her story is also that of an incredibly successful entrepreneur and business owner. Due to the lack of plumbing in their homes, African American women could not wash their hair frequently and would experience significant hair loss as a result. In her search for solving this problem for herself, Madam C.J. Walker began her professional career as sales agent selling hair products. She later developed a hair care system that solved the hair care needs of African American women. By the end of her life, in 1919, her business had 40,000 employees in the United States, Central America and the Caribbean and generated sales above $500,000. Madam C.J. Walker was a masterful business owner. She was a pioneer in employment practices. She was focused not only in personal wealth creation, but in empowering her employees to become independent, self-reliant career women and men, enacting policies such as generous commissions and extensive training. Through her employment practices and her marketing strategies, she influenced the perception of black women in society and provided opportunities to many black men and women to escape poverty, become economically independent and build wealth. 

Resources: 


Mildred “Babe” Didrikson Zaharias (1911-1956)Mildred Babe Didrickson Zaharias

Voted by the Associated Press as the Greatest Female Athlete of the first half of the twentieth century, Babe Didrikson excelled in every sport she tried. She was an All-American in basketball, she competed in three Olympic events, played baseball with the House of David and then found her real home as a golfer. As a golfer she dominated both the amateur and, later, professional ranks, winning the U.S. Open in 1948. In 1953, the first Babe Zaharias Open was played. Didrikson set world records in the javelin, high jump, baseball throw and 80-meter hurdles. She also won two Gold medals and one Silver at the 1932 Los Angeles Olympics. Due to some of the challenges she faced to play golf, Didrikson helped co-found the LPGA in 1949. Didrikson married George Zaharias in 1939 and he became her manager until her death from cancer in 1956. 

Resources: 

Fall 2020 President's & Dean's List
Fall 2020 President's & Dean's List
Thursday, February 25, 2021

Kent State University at Stark has announced its Dean’s List and President’s List for the fall 2020 semester. 

Requirements for the Dean’s List include a 3.40 grade point average or above for the fall 2020 semester and at least 12 letter-graded (A, B, etc.) credit hours completed by the end of the semester.

President’s List criteria are a 4.00 grade point and at least 15 letter-graded credit hours completed by the end of the semester.
 

FALL 2020 PRESIDENT'S* & DEAN'S LIST

The following students have been named to the Kent State Stark Dean’s List. Those students designated with a star (*) have been named to the Kent State University President’s List. 

Jay Aaron
Destini Adorisio
Julianne Agnone
Andrea Alderman
Brittany Alterio*
Haleigh Alexander
Brianna Allen
Brooke Allen
Morgan Allen
Sarah Amatangelo
Emily Anderson
Terrance Anderson
Esther Anka
Ethan Armstrong
Angelica Aronson
Vincent Arrigo*
Joseph Artimez
Mikayla Ashba
Cade Aten
Eric Atkinson
Rachel Autz
Maya Bachtel
Abigail Bacon
Sierra Baer
Spencer Bagwell
Ron Bailey
Brooke Baker
Savannah Baker
Tyler Baker
Cameron Balca
Alexander Banks*
Samantha Baranek*
Jimmie Barber
Brooke Barr
Jacob Barton
Elaine Bast
Leslie Bast*
Jamie Bates
Macy Battershell
Alexa Battista
Samantha Battista*
Mason Batty
Amanda Baxter
Paige Bazaar
Skylar Beaty
Melissa Becerra
Sonia Becerra
Madison Behon
Robert Bever
Emma Bezek
Dylan Biehl
Brandy Bishop*
Madison Black
Kylie Blair
Joshua Blasko
Ian Bleininger
Marisa Bleininger
Joshua Boggs
Olivia Bohon
Joshua Boley
Mackayli Bolyard-Pizana*
Leah Borotkanics
Juliana Borsellino
Grace Boswell
Rachel Bowe
LaKaleb Bowen
Maxx Bowman
Sydney Boyd
Constance Bozeman
Jessica Bracken
Hunter Bradley
Kinslee Brasill
Elisabeth Brian*
Makenzea Briggs
Selah Brown
Spencer Brown
Jordan Browning*
Dora Brumbaugh
Tristan Bryant
Karley Buchanan
Thomas Bullock
Tyler Bulone
Lauren Burton
Seana Byard
Crystal Byler
Donovan Byler*
Gregory Cain
Natalie Cannon*
Emily Cannone
Robert Capell
Claire Carpenter*
Lauren Carpenter
Bethany Carr
Benjamin Carretta*
Amber Casey
Clay Casper
Morgan Casper*
Pablo Castillo Gomez
Carissa Casto-Leglise
Megan Chatelain
Harlee Christner
Minung Chung
Anna Clark
Anthony Clement
Jordan Cline
Makayla Clos*
Hannah Coblentz
Colton Cochran
Rylee Cole
Kylie Collmar
Joy Colvin
Makenzie Compson
Nicholas Comune
Kiersten Congrove
Hannah Conley
Christopher Conti
Sean Cooley
Sean Cooper*
Kaitlyn Cordell
Morgan Cottrell
Jenna Covalesky*
Amanda Cox*
Jaclyn Coyle*
Sean Craney
Hanna Crasi
Parker Crawford
Tara Creque
Brayden Crites
Devon Crooks
Logan Crysler
Carli Cummins
Britney Cupery
Shelby Curlutu
Nathan Cutting*
Nicole Cvammen
Alyssa Cvitkovich
Allison Czekansky
Nicholas Dame
Emily Daniels
Jennifer Daring*
Allee Davidson-Chuck
Caitlyn Davis
Jackie Davis*
Meghan Davis
Lexianne De Leon
Eliana Dean
Hannah DeBos
Connor DeChiara
Samuel DeDominicis
Nicole Deertz
Jenna Del Valle
Stephen Delcoma
Jacob Demaree
Ashley Dennison
Connor Dick
Sean Dick
Arabella Dillard
Racquel Dillard*
Mattison Dolan
Dillon Donaldson
Timothy Donnelly
Catherine Draa
Gina Driggers
Madison Dubay*
Bailey Dugan
Nathan Dugan
Evan Dukeman
Cassandra Duplin
Anthony Eaglowski
Conrad Edmisten
Abbigail Edwards
Katherine Edwards*
Jared Eichelberger
Mckenzie Eiseman
Theodore ElFaye
Brittany Ellis
Miranda Etheredge
Gabrielle Evans
Allison Eyster*
Taylor Fedor
Brandon Fee*
Erin Fenk
Grace Film*
Eliza Finn
Derek Firth
Zane Fisher
Michelle Fitz
Jake Fliger
Sarah Flower
Tristan Ford
Amanda Fowler
Emma Francis
Olivia Francis
Jason Frankland
Lydia Frere
Brittany Friedrich
Joseph Fuller
Dillon Fulton
Emily Furlow
Tessa Fusko
Rebecca Garren
Grace Garritano
Ryan Gavorcik
Sean Gayler
Jacob Geisheimer
Samuel Gentile
Quinn Gerney
Jordan Gilbert
Carley Gillespie
Christina Gillmore
Joshua Glover
Maliq Goncalves
Jessica Good
Emily Gordon
Benjamin Graber
Seth Grabowski
Jenna Graves
Victoria Graves
Audrey Graytok*
Brenden Greaves
Adam Gregory
Josiah Gregory
Jacob Griffiths
Nicholas Grishaber
Ross Grismer
Jeremy Groff
Daniel Groves
Kyle Gruber
Madison Grzybowski
Landynn Gundlach
McKenzie Haidet
Sara Haidet*
Caden Haines-Tessanne
Elijah Hall
Mary Hammel
Raven Hancock
Seth Harbert*
Grace Hare
Katherine Harlan
Hannah Harmon
Williemina Harmon
Makiyah Harris
Kelly Harter
Meghan Harter
Christian Hartley
Claire Haswell
Sydney Hathaway
Rebecca Haught
Nick Hayden
Bethany Haynes
Whitney Hendershot
Lindsey Henderson
Alaina Henley
Paige Henman
Anna Henson
Casey Herndon
Jacob Hershberger
Riley Hershberger
Jillian Herstine
Ella Hettich
Imari Hill
Brock Himmelheber
Cole Hinton
Jennifer Hinton
Emma Hlad
Lisa Holder
Lana Hollis
Hannah Holzopfel
Nicholas Hoover
Tyler Hopfensperger
Neil Hoxworth
Ruth Hrusch
Govan Hudson
Danielle Hunter
Mariah Hupp
Madisyn Husted
Hope Hutchings
Baylie Huth
Alexis Hymes
Sarah Iden
Tanner Immel*
Muhammed Ismail
Christine Janson
Alec Johnson
Paige Johnson
Shaylynn Johnson
Tailor Johnson
Jenna Johnston*
Hanna Jones*
Kia Jones
Sean Jordan*
Summer Jordan
Tessa Joseph
Trinity Judy
Brendan Kambrick
Viktoria Kaminski
Jaden Kandel
Mary Karcher
Thomas Karcher
Kristi Karickhoff
Olivia Kast
Merlayna Kauffman
Zach Kauffman
Jillian Keen
Alexis Keeton
Ezra Keeton
Ashley Kertes
Rafika Khalfallah
Hanzala Khalid
Kathryn Kidwell
Haley Killingsworth
Daniel Klotz
Makayla Knicely
Peyton Knight
Ashley Knoch
Jaret Knox
Donovan Koman
Katelyn Konetsky*
Kellie Kordinak
Caleb Kovach
Nicole Kovatch
Gavin Krall
Laura Kronk
Madeline Kurtz
Hope Kvasnicka
Ian Lamb
Kaleigh Lamson
Ali Lancaster
Eric Landrum
Julian Larew
Sarah Lawver
Kaitlin Leach
Erika Lear
Chad Leatherberry
Emma Lego
Jeffry Lengel
Alivia Lepley
Derek Levengood
Jackson Leventhal
Lauren Lieser
Jonathan Lilly
Miles Listerman
Jacob Logozzo
Brenden Longwell*
Reed Lucas*
Jacob Lupardus
Ryan Lutz
Andrea Maag
Mason Madenfort
Nicholas Maio
Natalie Maley
Kayla Maloof
Madolyn Manack
Nicole Marran
LeAndra Martin
Isamar Martin
Macy Martin
Madison Martin
Grace Martin-Santulan*
Crystal Martinez-Jacome
Jessica Mathews
Daniel Maurer
Tessa Maurer*
Tejasvini Mavuleti
Schyler Maxhimer
Jess May
Lauren May
Alyssa McCarthy
Maria McDonald
Austin McElroy
Abigail McGhee
Aine McGee
Tessa McInturf
Branden Mckee
Claire McKelvey
Leeann McKenna
Aleah McKenzie
Logan McNutt
Camille McPherson
Austin Medure
Jennifer Mellinger*
Morgan Mellor
Victoria Menches
Rachel Menegay
Raelynn Meritt
Dominic Merlitti
Aleah Mesaros
Hannah Messner*
Madison Meszaros*
Thomas Metz
Jim Meyer
Thomas Meyers
Kaitlyn Michaels
Amanda Miller
Brice Miller
Ellie Miller
Joseph A. Miller
Joseph D. Miller
Kaleb Miller*
Katherine Miller
Leah Miller
Nicole Miller
Lane Mitchell
Nevaeh Mitchell
Ellie Mizener
Rachel Mohr
Travis Moldovan
Lynnita Moore
Giovanni Moretta
Kelsey Morgan
Micaelah Morgan Abdul-Ali
Emma Mori
Evelyn Morrison*
Jessica Morton
Shanae Moss*
David Mullett
Sabrina Murch
Taylor Murray
Jonathan Mustard
Carlie Myers
Danielle Myers
Olivia Nagy
Melissa Namy*
Elizabeth Narris
Joshua Nason
Susan Nason
Madison Naugle
Clay Neisel
Merina Nicholas
Kaitlyn Nicholson
Skylar Nicholson
Kaitlin Nime
Autumn Norris
Joshua Norris
Aftyn North
Brianna Nutter
Trevor Nutter
Danielle O’Connor
Taylor O’Donnell
Baylee Offenberger
Samantha Ogg
Taylor O’Lear
Chloe Orin*
Joan Oster
Luke Overmire
Alyssa Owens*
Joshua Owens
Mason Owens
Anju Pandhak
Nathan Paparone
Gabrielle Parcher
Kara Parsons
Delaney Patterson
Katelyn Patterson*
Michaela Patterson
Mary Peach
Blake Pearsall
Terri Pelger
Madison Petersen
Haley Pettit
Jason Phillips
Evan Piscitani
Nicole Pittson
Matt Plucinski
Alexis Pochubay*
Jessica Poletti*
Allison Portman
Carrie Powell
Jordan Preston
Breanna Price
Nicholas Prince
Sydney Prince
Morgan Pugh
Riley Pullen
Allyson Purdy
Avery Rair
Alexandros Ramos
Kayla Rauschenbach
Christy Rawdon
Emily Real
Clara Reed
Shaun Reed
Analiese Reichlin
Rylie Rich
Brendon Ridge
Charleigh Riffle*
Luke Ritchey
Mariah Ritchey
Samuel Roach
Renee Robinette
Hanna Rodak
Leah Rogers
Madison Roman
Lauren Rooney
Miranda Rosato*
Micah Rose
Tyler Ross
Brittany Roush
Neil Ruble
Steven Rudder
Kaitlyn Rueschman*
Giovanna Ruskowski
Ronna Russell
Collin Saal
Lexa Saia
Khalila Saleh
Jaquiez Sampson
Kara Sams
Nicole Sanderson
Thomas Sarver
Alexis Saunders
Michael Savoldi
Madison Schaber
Christopher Schell
Lauren Schering
James Schindewolf
Alyssa Schippert
Alexander Schlabach
Maxwell Schlabach
Courtney Schofield
CJ Schulman
Hannah Schweier
Faith Seders
Joshua Seefong
Aaron Shaffer
Summer Shaffer
Joni Shaw
Brennan Shirley
Jack Shoup
Shana Shultz
Ashlee Slutz*
Chloe Sickman
Lane Simpson
Savanna Simpson
Isabella Slaubaugh
Patiance Sloan
Julia Smith*
Keith Smith
Natalie Smith
Sarah Smith
Brandy Snyder
Tessa Snyder*
Samantha Soisson
Megan Somerick
Valentine Spangler*
Brandon Sparks
Andrew Spence
Elizabeth Spieth
Brianna Sprout
Alexis Stahl
Mariah Stanish
Jenna Stanley
Destiny Starks
Daniel Stephan
Kaylyn Stevens
Haley Stewart
Natajah Stokes
Robin Storad
Abbey Straight
Janay Strayton
Delaney Streby
Payton Sullivan
Riley Sullivan
Paige Svab
Madison Swartzentruber
Caprice Swedren
Rhea Szabo
Trinity Tackett
Ana Tahir
Max Taki
Lauren Tarver
Kate Taseff
Camille Tenney
Olivia Terranova
Delaney Thomas
Emily Thomas*
Alaska Thompson
Alex Thompson
Samantha Thorpe
Abigail Thouvenin*
Natalie Thouvenin
MaKenzie Thrasher
Jaime Tobin
Nicholas Tomola
Ethan Tonkel*
Jeffrey Traynor
Kaitlyn Troyer
Tara Tucci
Steven Turik
Emily Turkily
Lana Ulrich
Kaitlyn Unklesbay*
Lexee Valentine
Jacob Vanasse
Austin Vandegrift
Taylor Vanderveen
Nicole Vargo
Adam Varlamos
Louis Varlamos
Hannah Vaughn
Madeline Vernyi
Madison Villegas
Christopher Vogt
Athena Vohs
Grace Vosi
Savannah Waldron
Kaitlyn Wallace
Lisa Wallace
William Waller
Hannah Wallis
Sharon Walsh
Tatum Walulik
Joshua Warren
Autumn Wassam
Hailey Weaver
Taylor Weaver*
Hailey Weidlich
Sarah Weinstock
Haley Weller
Makenzie Westfall
Dylan Weygandt
Emma Whalen
Layne Wheeler
Carlie Whisner
Malori Wike
Beau Wilkinson
Brooke Wilkinson*
Walter Wilks
Brandon Williams
Brice Williams
Lindsay Williams
Natalie Williams
Alexis Wilson
McKenzie Wilson
Mikayla Wirkki
Fox Witt
Nathan Wodzisz*
Victoria Wolfe
Miles Woodling
Kenneth Woodring
Casey Worges
Nathan Worth
Stephanie Wrest*
Olivia Wright
Samuel Wright
Tori Wright
Olivia Yoder
Alexander Yost
Garrett Young
Shayne Young
Samantha Zehner
Spencer Zolla*

Black History Month at Kent State Stark
Black History Month at Kent State Stark
Friday, February 12, 2021

Black History Month, or National African American History Month (United States), is an official, annual celebration of achievements by Black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history. In 1970, according to the "Kent Stater," Kent State University began observance of Black History Month, however, it was not until 1976 that every president designated the month of February as Black History Month. Black History month is also officially recognized in February in Canada.

The Kent State Stark Black History Committee's observance of Black History Month will be spotlighting the achievements of African-Americans from various fields and disciplines.


VIRTUAL FILM PRESENTATION & DISCUSSIONThe Black List Volume Two

THE BLACK LIST: VOLUME TWO
Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2021
11 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Via Zoom

REGISTER
The link to the film showing will be emailed to you after you register. View event flyer.

They’re artists, academics, athletes, activists, authors and more -- a remarkable group of African-American notables share candid stories and revealing insights into the struggles, triumphs and joys of black life in the U.S. From the childhood inspirations that shaped their ambitions, to the evolving American landscape they helped define, to the importance of preserving a unique cultural identity for future generations, these prominent individuals offer a unique look into the zeitgeist of black America, redefining the traditional pejorative notion of a blacklist.

Discussion moderated by Professor Jessica Jones, Dr. Joel Carbonell and Dr. Robert Hamilton. Direct questions to Professor Jessica Jones at jjones1@kent.edu

Sponsored by the Kent State Stark Black History Committee.


FEATURED BLACK AMERICANS

 
Maj. Gen. Charles Frank Bolden, Jr.Maj. Gen. Charles Frank Bolden, Jr.

  • Born August 19, 1946 in Columbia, South Carolina
  • Education: BS in Electrical Engineering, United States Naval Academy; MS in Systems Management from University of Southern California (USC)
  • Member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity
  • United States Marine Corps pilot and major general
  • Astronaut – flew on four space shuttle flights
  • Became 12th director of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
  • First African-American permanent director of agency
  • Directed NASA from 2009 – 2017
  • Distinguished awards: National Space Trophy, Nierenberg Prize and Carl Sagan Award

Amanda S. C. GormanAmanda S. C. Gorman

  • Born March 7, 1998
  • Education: studied sociology and graduated cum laude from Harvard University
  • Youngest-ever inaugural poet in the U.S.; delivered an inaugural poetry reading at the January, 20, 2021, inauguration
  • Received a Genius Grant from OZY Media
  • Three books forthcoming from Penguin Random House, including "The Hill We Climb"
  • Contributor to the New York Times, CBS This Morning¸ among many notable others
  • Appointed the first-ever National Youth Poet Laureate in 2017 by Urban Word – a program that supports Youth Poets Laureate across the country

“For there is always light,
If only we're brave enough to see it,
If only we're brave enough to be it.”
– Poetry reading of "The Hill We Climb"

Source: www.theamandagorman.com
Photo source: Kelia Anne/Sun Literary Arts via AP


Cornel West, Ph.D.Cornel West Ph.D.

  • Born June 2, 1953
  • Completed his undergraduate degree in three years from Harvard University
  • M.A. & Ph.D. from Princeton University in philosophy
  • Currently Professor of the Practice of Public Philosophy at Harvard University
  • Advocate for democracy and racial justice
  • Has written 20 books
  • Frequent contributor on CNN, C-Span, Democracy Now, Bill Maher Show

Source: www.cornelwest.com


LEARN MORE

Discover more about Kent State Stark's diversity events and committees.

 

 

Virtual Biology Information Session
Virtual Biology Information Session
Thursday, February 04, 2021

People, program, spaces...that's really what you are looking at when you are exploring a major.

During this virtual event, learn about our biological sciences program from faculty, take a virtual tour and see the classrooms and labs where our students become world-class biologists.

Biology Information Session
Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021
5:30 - 6:30 p.m. via Zoom
 

REGISTER TODAY
A personalized Zoom link will be sent to you after you register for the event.

If you can't make it, please still register! We will send you a recording after the event.


CONTACT

Office of Admissions
starkadmissions@kent.edu
330-244-3251

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE KENT STATE STARK BIOLOGY PROGRAM

State Auditors Office
State Auditors Office
Thursday, February 04, 2021

Auditor of State Keith Faber’s Office and Kent State University are pleased to announce that the Auditor’s East Regional Office recently moved into space at Kent State University’s Stark Campus.
 
“This is an exciting move for our office for many reasons, especially the cost savings and opportunities for recruitment with Kent State students and community members,” said Auditor Faber. “I hope we can see more of these types of partnerships among state institutions to save taxpayer dollars and increase public engagement with state operations.”
 
The Auditor’s Office has 11 offices across the state. They previously rented space in downtown Canton before negotiating the lease with Kent State, which will result in a savings of 17%. In an effort to save money in rent costs, Auditor Faber initiated a comprehensive office space utilization analysis that is resulting in significant rent reductions while maintaining necessary resources for employees. The Auditor’s Office has made office space moves in the Northeast, Southeast, Southwest and Central regions.
 
Auditor Faber worked with Nick Gattozzi, Kent State’s executive director of government and community relations, and Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., Kent State Stark’s dean and chief administrative officer, to find what the state auditor’s office describes as the perfect location: Kent State Stark’s Conference Center.
 
The space allows for a productive work environment that provides the following opportunities: working with students, offering internships to those interested in finance; engaging with the public; hosting larger meetings in an International Association of Conference Centers (IACC) accredited building. The office is conveniently located off I-77 in Jackson Township and has ample free parking.
 
The Auditor’s Office also plans to utilize the space for future recruitment career fairs and for hosting regional trainings.
 
“We are always looking for ways to collaborate with local and state governmental offices and this partnership made sense,” said Gattozzi. “It really is a win-win for the state auditor’s office, taxpayers and the Stark Campus, as it provides enhanced opportunities for students and the community. We are happy Auditor Faber recognizes the incredible value of being located at Kent State Stark.”
 
Dean Seachrist agreed the move is a win-win for the campus and the state.
 
“We are pleased to welcome the auditor’s East Regional Office to our beautiful Conference Center,” she said. “As Stark County’s only public university, we are continually seeking new opportunities to benefit our already stellar student experience, while providing great spaces for our community and ways to increase public engagement with local and state agencies for the betterment of Northeast Ohio – and beyond.”
 
Kent State University is a well-respected state institution with seven regional campuses. The Stark Campus spans 200 acres near Canton and is Kent State’s largest regional campus. Kent State Stark offers 21 bachelor’s degrees, one master’s degree, three associate degrees, one graduate certificate, 37 minors and the opportunity to complete general education coursework toward any undergraduate program at Kent State University. 
 
While Auditor of State employees are primarily working from home as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, auditors have had to use work space in the regional offices to complete some duties. The Kent State Stark agreement went into effect on Jan. 1, 2021, and auditors are able to currently use the space.
 
###
 
The Auditor of State’s office, one of five independently elected statewide offices in Ohio is responsible for auditing more than 6,000 state and local government agencies. Under the direction of Auditor Keith Faber, the office also provides financial services to local governments, investigates and prevents fraud in public agencies, and promotes transparency in government.


Contacts

AOS Public Affairs
Allie Dumski
Press Secretary
614-644-1111
ajdumski@ohioauditor.gov

Kent State University at Stark
Melissa Seeton
Assistant Director, Communications
330-244-3262
mseeton@kent.edu
 

A message from the Dean
A message from the Dean
Thursday, January 07, 2021

Thursday, Jan. 7, 2021

 
Washington is burning, and this isn’t the first time.

In 1814, British troops stormed our capital city, setting ablaze several buildings, including the White House. On Wednesday, while we watched in horror and shock as protesters stormed the Capitol Building, we couldn’t help but feel that democracy was burning in this present day.

Just as the old rule attempted to assert power, authority and supremacy during the War of 1812, an organized group rallied for the same as they scaled walls and buildings, destroyed hallowed halls and defaced symbols of American freedom. 

But for every seemingly hopeless moment, there are heroes who rise up. We thank the brave officials who worked well into the night to complete the electoral count, and ensure democracy, indeed, shines brightly during this dark hour. 

This time, it wasn’t the British who were coming, but our own countrymen. We once fought for the freedom to worship as we choose, and to drink coffee instead of tea. But this kind of unrest is something our nation hasn’t experienced since the Civil War. 

As Stark County’s public university, Kent State University at Stark stands with our elected officials of both parties, who represent the public good.

We reiterate the words of Kent State University President Todd Diacon, who stated today: “At this moment in our nation’s history, now more than ever, I call on Americans to embrace and practice our university’s core value of kindness and respect in all that we do. Democracy is both a mighty force and a fragile vessel that relies on a universally shared commitment to dialogue, understanding and the truth. We assert, and rightly so, that hate has no home at Kent State University. Hate and sedition likewise should have no home in the United States of America.”

Yesterday’s unfortunate show of privilege will not win. We must not forget the lessons of the past year – from the consequences of political unrest to the power of the Black Lives Matter movement. We must do better as a nation. Our future depends upon it.

We would all do well to remember those word penned by our nation’s founding fathers so long ago:

We the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, ensure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

We are the people. We are the mothers, daughters, sons and fathers, the community members who come together in spite of this. We are the educators, the students who hold the integrity of this great country in our hands. After all, some things are worth saving.

As the British troops drew closer to the White House more than two centuries ago, then First Lady Dolley Madison did something some might have considered strange, but symbolic, nonetheless. She ordered the famed Lansdowne portrait of George Washington to be saved. Breaking its 8-by-5-foot glass enclosure, shards rained down on Madison and her staff. Still, they escaped with the painting.

And, today, we are a little broken, too. But we walk away with something worth saving.

Sincerely,

Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Stark


 

Fall 2020 Graduate Williemina Harmon
Friday, December 18, 2020

Right now, many people are getting ready to celebrate the holidays and the coming new year – a welcome change and hopeful new start. At Kent State University at Stark, more than 140 students are preparing to graduate with their bachelor’s degrees – providing them with the keys to a brighter tomorrow.

One of those students is psychology senior Williemina Harmon. She knows education changes lives.

Harmon, a 2016 McKinley Senior High School graduate, was determined to go to Kent State Stark at a young age. Her mother was a Kent State Stark alumna and her father a Malone University alumnus. Her parents’ love story began on the Stark Campus, and her older sister, Kimberly, also attended Kent State Stark.

“College was always put in a place of importance in my family,” said Harmon. “A good education was the benchmark to security and success.”

She originally wanted to become a nurse, like her mom, but after a few introductory courses, she realized it wasn’t the path for her. Harmon became passionate about psychology after taking several Kent Core classes on the topic. One day, she hopes to practice art therapy. 

Harmon has become a very familiar face on campus these past four years. She held various positions in Student Services as a student worker, helped with campus tours and campus events as a Campus Ambassador. She also worked as a mentor in the Bulldog Flash Academic Institute, now the Rising Scholars Program, and was part of the Black Student Union. 

“I really loved working on campus… Each one (job) allowed me to interact with students. For me, that was exciting,” she said. “Not only just interacting with students, but influencing their college experience for the better… As a Campus Ambassador, I got to meet many people, including Featured Speaker Mary Frances Berry, which was beyond cool.”

It hasn’t all been sunshine and rainbows, though.

“I have not had the easiest time during my college career,” Harmon acknowledged. “I struggled with fundamental challenges I think every student my age does: choosing a career, finding independence, fostering courage and making the best choices for myself. I have grown a lot from the 18-year-old I was when I entered college.”

On top of that, the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic turned her last two semesters upside down. 

“This year has been the hardest for sure. With COVID-19, everyone has had to make some extreme adjustments,” she said. “I adapted like everyone else. It was my final semester, and nothing was going to stand in the way we me getting my degree.”

But the pandemic wasn’t the only hardship Harmon faced. In fact, there was a struggle much darker, much closer to home.

“A lot happened in my life before COVID-19 hit. My mother had a stroke. It shook me to my core,” she explained. “I was still going to classes and managing my education through it all. I think the only reason I was able to maintain was because my mom raised me to give my everything.”

So, along with her student and student worker hats, she added caregiver to the mix. It’s no wonder, the name Williemina means “willing to protect.”

And then the unthinkable happened. 

“It got even harder when my mom passed before she could fully recover.”

Harmon praised her sister Kimberly for helping her through. 

“She had my back and kept me grounded. I kept up with my schooling, sure in my decision to finish my degree no matter what. 

“I think it is what my mom would have wanted.”

For Harmon, the milestone of graduating college means more this year than any other. 

“This achievement will be a positive thing in a year of many negative experiences,” she said. “To me, it feels like finishing a marathon, and you crossed the finish line, but instead of just running that marathon, you had a 100 lb. weight put on your back in the last 10 miles.”

And Harmon will tell you that she is not done running.

“I plan to get my master’s degree,” she said proudly. “And see the world. And live a fulfilled life. And help many people.”

Harmon has a contagious passion for people and community, especially those who are marginalized, and that will be a driving force in her future endeavors.

“For me, community is all about being able to thrive in a world that is accepting of everyone – no matter their race, age, gender and/or sexuality,” she said. “Diversity is so important and so is love. One of my dreams and missions in life is to make the world a better and more accepting and diverse place, especially for minorities who are often misunderstood, criminalized or disliked for being who they are.”

And that’s where her psychology degree will come into play.

“I want to use my degree and work as a counselor and help people find their voices and their strength. I want to be a mouthpiece for justice, kindness and love. And, I look forward to those interactions and meeting people from all over the world and learning from them,” she said. "That is something I learned at Kent, that being in an environment that allows you to meet so many different people from different walks of life teaches you so much about human life and how to be a more empathetic and open-minded person.”

And it sounds to us like Harmon may be following in Civil Rights activist Mary Frances Berry’s footsteps, too. Because as Berry has said:

“The time when you need to do something is when people are saying it can’t be done.”

Take a Virtual Campus Tour
Monday, December 14, 2020

Tour Your Hometown University from the comfort and safety of your own home. Kent State University at Stark offers an endless amount of educational opportunities.

Learn more about what’s possible through this interactive and immersive experience.

Launch Virtual Campus Tour

Blue Gold and Grateful
Wednesday, December 09, 2020

Stark Campus employees to support small business this holiday season; $7K boost to local economy

Kent State University at Stark and the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce are partnering on a new Kent State University employee appreciation initiative that gives back to local businesses and families.

The "Blue, Gold & Grateful!" campaign provides all Kent State University at Stark employees with a $20 voucher to spend at select small businesses during the month of December. 

“Our faculty and staff have worked diligently to accomplish great things this semester, including achieving enrollment growth during a pandemic,” said Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., dean and chief administrative officer at Kent State University at Stark. “We are happy to extend this small token of appreciation toward the purchase of a heartfelt gift after an unprecedented year when we’ve discovered ways to rally together to keep our community strong.”

Working with the chamber, Kent State Stark identified and selected the following small businesses that agreed to participate in the program:

  • Muggzwigz Coffee & Tea locations:  Downtown Coffee & Tea Bar Roastery & HQ, 137 Walnut Ave. NE, Canton; Lake Cable Coffee & Tea Bar, 5854 Fulton Drive NW, Canton; Portage Lakes Coffee & Tea Bar, 3452 Manchester Road, Akron.
  • Mama Guzzardi's Italian Restaurant:  1107 N. Main St., North Canton.
  • Shale Brewing Company:  7253 Whipple Ave. NW, North Canton.
  • Studio Arts & Glass:  7495 Strauss Ave. NW, North Canton.
  • Nothing Bundt Cakes:  4468 Belden Village St. NW, Suite B, Canton.

Dennis P. Saunier, president and CEO of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, agreed the win-win initiative helps strengthen the county’s business community – providing for a boost of up to $7,000 to the local economy. 
 
“Our small business community, particularly restaurants and retailers, have been especially hard-hit during this pandemic,” Saunier said. “When Kent State Stark approached us with an initiative that would not only serve as a thanks to their employees, but would boost local businesses in the process, we jumped at the opportunity to form this partnership.”

Joe Rozsa, communications director at Shale Brewing Company, said the local brewery is happy to take part in “Blue, Gold & Grateful!”.

“Shale Brewing Company has always been a firm believer in collaborating with and supporting local businesses and organizations whenever possible. The idea Kent State Stark gifted funds to their employees to explore local businesses and spend those funds locally is nothing short of genius,” Rozsa said. “We welcome the opportunity not only to participate but to serve those who have visited before, but we especially look forward to serving those who haven’t.”

Seachrist said one of 2020’s biggest lessons is about the importance of home: a safe place we can count on.

“There’s no better way to support local families than to check off those holiday shopping lists right in our hometown, where original handmade gifts and tastes of the season can be purchased with pride,” she said. “Such thoughtfully curated items are sure to be treasured during a season for which we have so much to be thankful.”


For media inquiries, please contact Melissa Seeton, assistant director of communications at Kent State University at Stark at mseeton@kent.edu; and Collyn Floyd, director of marketing and events at the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce at collynf@cantonchamber.org.
 

A message from the Dean
A message from the Dean
Thursday, December 03, 2020

Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020 

 
Dear students and campus community,

Today, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine announced that Stark County has been raised to COVID-19 Risk Level 4 Purple status. As a result, we must adhere to the state’s guidelines for counties at a COVID-19 Risk Level 4 status. We have anticipated and planned for this moment.

Even before this change in the county’s risk level, we have taken necessary measures to ensure the safety of our campus and our community, moving to all-remote instruction on Nov. 30.

We are implementing additional changes in our Stark Campus operating procedures in order to decrease in-person interaction with others, in adherence with the state’s guidance for counties in purple status.

For our campus, this risk level change means all-remote instruction will continue as planned through the remainder of the semester. It also means:

  • Many buildings will be closed and employees who can work from home should do so.
  • To meet the needs of our students, our campus library and computer lab in the East Wing of Main Hall will remain open at limited capacities.
  • The Stark Campus Bookstore will remain open to help students and faculty with their textbook requirements.

With COVID-19 surging in Ohio, everyone must continue to use extra care when guarding against the spread of the coronavirus. Following the Flashes Safe Seven safety principles is still vitally important, despite fewer people on campus.

Wherever you are, remember to wear a face covering, practice frequent handwashing, maintain physical distancing and avoid gatherings. Per state guidelines, you should only leave home for supplies and services.

Take Good Care
For all Stark Campus students, faculty, and staff, free testing continues at CVS Minute Clinic locations.  Follow this link to schedule a test. Visit the COVID-19 testing webpage for all testing options.

It is also important to be prepared with a supply of over-the-counter medications and to take good care of yourself by getting plenty of rest and drinking lots of water to stay in top virus-fighting form. Remember, too, that help is always available by visiting our Wellness Resource Guide.  Students may seek help from our Stark Campus Counseling Services team.

Learning Resources
We understand that remote learning can pose challenges for some. Help is available at our campus’ Academic Success Center, which offers tutoring and other remote services.

Know that we will continue to support one another during these challenging times. We have prepared for this moment since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. May you rest in the stellar academic work of this unparalleled semester with the assurance we are ready to face these unprecedented hardships together.

Keep staying safe as we #StayHometown and finish 2020 stronger, together.

Sincerely,

Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Stark


 

Tuesday, November 10, 2020

Outstanding professors have comprehensive knowledge of their fields, effectively and resourcefully organize and present material, and stimulate student thinking and understanding.

Students, alumni, faculty and staff are invited to submit nominations for such an outstanding professor at Kent State Stark.

Based on your nominations, a member of the full-time faculty will be awarded the Distinguished Teaching Award, and an adjunct (part-time) faculty member will be the recipient of the Award of Distinction.

Award recipients will be announced in May. A selection committee consisting of Kent State Stark faculty and students will choose the recipients. 

The following criteria is used in the selection process:

  • Comprehensive knowledge of his or her field
  • Effectiveness in organizing and presenting material
  • Ability to stimulate thinking and develop understanding in students
  • Ability to arouse student interest
  • Demonstrated resourcefulness

These awards are not popularity contests. Simply submitting a faculty member's name is not enough. Only those nominations which thoroughly describe why the faculty member is outstanding (50 word minimum) will be forwarded to the selection committee.

Deadline to submit nominationsSunday, Dec. 20, 2020, at 11:59 p.m.

SUBMIT NOMINATION


Questions about the 2020-21 nomination process can be directed to:

Dr. Deepraj Mukherjee
Associate Professor, Economics
Selection Committee Chair
dmukherj@kent.edu

Learn more about the Distinguished Teaching Award and Award of Distinction at Kent State Stark.
 

Virtual Studio Art Information Session
Virtual Studio Art Information Session
Wednesday, November 04, 2020

People, program, spaces...that's really what you are looking at when you are exploring a major.

During this virtual event, learn about our studio art/fine arts program from faculty, take a virtual live tour and see the classrooms and studios where our students become world-class artists.

Virtual Studio Art Information Session
Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020
2:45 - 3:45 p.m. via Zoom
 

REGISTER TODAY
A personalized Zoom link will be sent to you after you register for the event.

If you can't make it, please still register! We will send you a recording after the event.


CONTACT

Office of Admissions
starkadmissions@kent.edu
330-244-3251

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE KENT STATE STARK STUDIO ART PROGRAM

An'Jeanette Beverly at Kent State Stark
Wednesday, November 04, 2020

Orphaned at age 11, An’Jeanette Beverly struggled to find her place. When she discovered the support of her Hometown University, this first-generation college student excelled. Still, that dream almost came to a halt. Kent State University at Stark’s Last Dollar Scholarship is carrying her through to graduation day. In December, this 38-year-old will graduate, despite the challenges, with her bachelor’s degree in business management. 

Nights were the worst. In the darkness, An’Jeanette Beverly questioned when the dawn would come. Alone. Left behind. Then, just 11 years old, the words repeated in her mind: unwanted, unworthy, unloved, unqualified. 

But this survivor knows a thing or two about second chances and last dollars.

After all, the path that leads to addiction could have been an easy road for Beverly to follow, but she didn’t. She mustered the courage to leave an abusive household, the first she was placed into after her mother lost parental rights. Summit County Children’s Services then found her a loving home. 

Barely a teenager, she also entered the agency’s Independent Living Program, where foster kids are prepared for life’s challenges and how to live as an adult at age 18. What Beverly didn’t realize is that storm after storm would come. 

Recently, the COVID-19 pandemic left this single mom making tough choices: paying the bills or buying enough food to keep herself and her 17-year-old son fed. Graduation just within reach, she didn’t know if she would have enough money to pay for her final semester at Kent State University at Stark.

“I had no money,” Beverly said. “Like so many in the country during this pandemic, I felt at one of my lowest points. Had I come this far to not graduate? And then, I learned I was given the Last Dollar Scholarship, and it was meant for situations just like mine.”

The Last Dollar Scholarship provides aid to students whose college education is near completion but are at risk due to an unexpected crisis that has left them without other financial options. 

“Without the Last Dollar Scholarship, it would have been very hard for me, especially working from home and caring for my son,” she said. “This scholarship has been a true blessing, and I’m so proud to be a student of Kent State Stark. When they say, ‘Flashes helping Flashes,’ they really mean that.” 

‘Anointed for the hard stuff’

Born and raised in Detroit, Beverly was just a little girl when her mother left to battle the nightmare of addiction. Dreams were few for Beverly, but there were some she clung to tightly. 

While in the children’s services’ Independent Living Program, she attended a seminar at Kent State University. There, she was inspired by the knowledge that an education could help drive your passion, landing you in a career that wasn’t just a job.  

“I didn’t know how, but I knew then I needed to get a college education,” she said. “I knew it would take me to the places where I was meant to be.

“That is my hope really, and this is my testimony,” she continued. “I was anointed for the hard stuff. I know that now. But it has qualified me to reach out to other people by sharing my story.”

A difficult path 

Beverly’s path to college wasn’t traditional. She dropped out of an Akron university when she became pregnant with her son. She found herself juggling work at an area factory and earning a license in cosmetology and her associate’s degree of applied business in legal assisting at a local community college. For years, she worked as a hair stylist after being laid off from her manufacturing job during the Great Recession. 

She discovered the passion she could have for a career when she landed an internship at the City of Canton’s Human Resources Department. There, the profession spoke to her desire to serve the public and better the lives of those around her. “I knew then, I wanted to get my bachelor’s degree in business management,” she said. “And Kent State Stark made that easy when I found out that my associate’s degree credits would transfer.”

Due to previous college coursework, however, her financial aid options were exhausted. 

“I remember sitting on my couch praying, ‘Lord, please bless me with a scholarship,’ ” she said.

Her son, Darryl, was praying, too. He asked that his mom’s internship would lead to a full-time job, and, one day, a home they could call their own. They eventually got both.

As Beverly crafted her application for the T. Raymond Gregory Family Foundation Business Management Scholarship at Kent State Stark, the words flowed effortlessly. When news of the full ride two-year scholarship award came, she broke down and cried in the office of coordinator for financial aid, Andrea Dale. 

“We were all crying,” she said, after Dale was able to confirm the scholarship award when Beverly worried she may not be eligible. “I feel like there is something hard in every blessing for me. Without this scholarship, I wouldn’t have been able to work toward my bachelor’s degree.”

In her footsteps

With one semester to go, the Gregory Scholarship award period ended. 

“During the pandemic, again I found myself not knowing how I would pay for my coursework,” Beverly said. “But again, God has carried me through. I didn’t even know about the Last Dollar Scholarship, and here it is, saving the day.”

So much so, graduation means the pursuit of further education. Beverly has been accepted into Kent State’s master’s program in business administration, where she’ll focus on human resources.

“It was such a blessing to show my family and my son that I can do this. I can do this for me. I can do this for our family,” she said. “I am a first-generation college graduate, and I’m going to be the first in my generation to pursue a master’s degree.”

Darryl is next in line. He graduates in the spring from Copley High School and has plans to go to college, following the path set by his mother’s trailblazing footsteps. 

‘Time to shine’

Beverly will turn 39 two days before she graduates on Dec. 19. Her son – and her mother, now more than a decade sober – will be cheering her on.

“It will be the best birthday ever,” Beverly said. “My heart is to give people hope. Sometimes, things happen and they lose that hope. But it can be better. Never give up. My heart is just to show people your hard times are not in vain. You can rise above this, even when things haven’t gone according to plan, it will all work out for your good.”  

She knows it’s after the hard-fought battle, the blessing arrives. It may be the Last Dollar Scholarship that comes along, when it’s least expected. 

After all, it’s the trudge through the valley, before the ascent to the mountaintop. It’s sitting on the sidelines, a face in the crowd, before taking the stage. It’s a new day for Beverly and the future is bright, as these words repeat in her mind:

Chosen.
Worthy.
Loved.
Qualified.

And while graduation may look a little different for everyone this year, even young Darryl knows, “Mom, it’s your time to shine.”


Make a dream come true today.

Make a decision that has an impact for generations. The gift of an education changes lives, like An’Jeanette Beverly’s. It changes families; it changes communities. Give to the Last Dollar Scholarship and help students make better tomorrows for years to come.

GIVE TO THE LAST DOLLAR SCHOLARSHIP
 

Virtual Nursing Information Session
Virtual Nursing Information Session
Monday, October 26, 2020

People, program, spaces...that's really what you are looking at when you are exploring a major.

During this virtual event, learn about the Kent State Stark nursing program from faculty, take a virtual live tour with our current nursing students and see the classrooms where our nursing students become world-class caregivers.

Virtual Nursing Information Session
Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020
12 - 1 p.m. via Zoom
 

REGISTER TODAY
A personalized Zoom link will be sent to you after you register for the event.

If you can't make it, please still register! We will send you a recording after the event.


CONTACT

Office of Admissions
starkadmissions@kent.edu
330-244-3251

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE KENT STATE STARK NURSING PROGRAM

A message from the Dean
A message from the Dean
Thursday, October 08, 2020

Thursday, Oct. 8, 2020 

 
Dear students and campus community,

Kent State University at Stark remains steadfastly focused on keeping everyone healthy and safe this fall – and beyond. 

We will continue with our COVID-19 mitigation strategies throughout the remainder of the academic year.

For our students, this means you can view spring semester courses with the knowledge that the campus’ course schedule will again include a mix of remote and in-person course offerings. Priority spring registration begins Oct. 27. 

As a reminder, all classes – including those courses that are currently meeting in-person – will move to a remote delivery format following Thanksgiving Recess.  

Please be advised that:

  • Thanksgiving Recess (no classes) will be observed Monday, Nov. 23, through Sunday, Nov. 29.
  • Classes resume on Monday, Nov. 30, and will be delivered remotely through the last day of instruction on Sunday, Dec. 13.
  • Final examinations will be delivered remotely during the week of Dec. 14-20.
  • Beginning Monday, Nov. 23, most campus offices will operate remotely through the remainder of the semester, including Student Services and the Academic Success Center

The spring semester calendar will follow a similar pattern. Spring break has been moved to April 12-18, 2021. After spring break, classes will continue remotely through the last day of instruction on Tuesday, May 4, 2021, and through final examinations, May 6-12, 2021. On May 4, there will be no classes between 12 to 2 p.m., a university tradition in remembrance of May 4, 1970. 

These changes are being made in an effort to reduce transmission of COVID-19.

As a reminder, please continue to follow the Flashes Safe Seven principles, wear a face covering at all times and limit in-person contact with others.

Thank you, all, for your efforts thus far to make this fall semester an academically productive and healthy time.

 
Sincerely,

Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Stark


 

Virtual Music Technology Preview on Oct. 23
Wednesday, October 07, 2020

Turn your passion into your profession. Discover a career in music production and audio recording.

Kent State University at Stark offers a complete four-year curriculum in music technology. This program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music and is only offered at Kent State Stark.

Spend some time with us to learn more about the music technology program!

VIRTUAL MUSIC TECHNOLOGY PREVIEW
FRIDAY, OCT. 23
2 - 4 P.M.

During our virtual Music Technology Preview, you'll

  • Review the admissions and advising process, and learn more about Kent State Stark
  • Talk shop with our highly-qualified music faculty
  • Discuss the program and internships with current music tech students
  • Take a virtual tour of the state-of-the-art audio and recording studios

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION
You'll receive instructions on how to access the virtual event right before Oct. 23, so be sure to check your email.


CONTACT

Cindy Deng
Admissions Counselor
330-244-3238
cdeng@kent.edu

 

A message from the Dean
A message from the Dean
Thursday, September 24, 2020

Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020

 
Dear students and campus community,

Today, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine announced a COVID-19 Risk Level 3 Red status for Stark County. As a result, we must adhere to the state’s guidelines for counties at a COVID-19 Risk Level 3 status. We have anticipated and planned for a change in the county’s risk level, and we are prepared to take the necessary measures to ensure the safety of our campus and community.

In keeping with our Kent State University reopening plan and with the state’s guidance for counties in red status, we are implementing changes in our Stark Campus operating procedures in order to decrease in-person interactions with others and limit gatherings. 

This status change means:  

  • The delivery mode of all in-person courses remains the same, unless your instructor informs you otherwise.
  • The Emporium Grille & Market is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. All menu items are available and offered in to-go containers. (updated Oct. 2)
  • The library will remain open. 
  • The East Wing Computer Lab will remain open.
  • The Recreation & Wellness Center has reopened. (updated Oct. 2)
  • The Office of Student Services is unable to take in-person payments. Payments can be made online.
  • Faculty and staff who can work remotely should do so until further notice.

Remember: Any Kent State Stark community member who has been exposed to, diagnosed with or shows symptoms of COVID-19 must contact the COVID Response Team at 330-672-2525. Further, any travel out of state and beyond must be reported to the COVID Response Team prior to departure.

These additional measures are aligned with the guidance of state and local health authorities, and we will continue to work in cooperation with these health experts to manage the virus in our community. Visit the university’s COVID-19 dashboard for more information regarding positive cases and campus status. 

Please remember, practicing the Flashes Safe Seven principles on and off campus is the best way for us to navigate the pandemic successfully.  We urge all Kent State Stark community members to sign up for Flash ALERTS to receive crisis communications through the emergency text system.

The ever-changing nature of this pandemic means that we must remain flexible and adjust our plans as necessary to ensure the health and safety of our community.  Thank you for your attention to this message.

Sincerely,

Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Stark


 

College Planning Made Easy
College Planning Made Easy
Thursday, September 17, 2020

In today's remote environment, set yourself up for success.

It’s no secret that planning for college is different this year and, perhaps, for the foreseeable future. Still, you can be your own champion during these uncertain times.

As the world continues to do its part to flatten the curve of COVID-19, college and university personnel have transitioned their services into remote or alternative models. This includes remote college courses and extracurricular activities, along with virtual campus tours and events. 

While virtual services offer a chance for students to comfortably explore and research their college options remotely, there are opportunities to safely tour a campus in person – even in your own hometown! A 2019 survey from the University of California-Los Angeles found that more than half of the 97,000 polled students indicated that a campus visit was a “very important” factor in choosing their school. 

I couldn't agree more! 

As an admissions counselor at Stark County’s only public university, students are often pleasantly surprised by the glimpse of student life and campus facilities that exist here, down the road from where they grew up. This is their Hometown University, where they can fully complete their bachelor’s degree at a fraction of the cost.

Whether it is done virtually or in person, college planning doesn’t have to be an overwhelming experience – if you begin now. 

Here’s an easy way to help you prioritize your own college planning to-do’s while meeting all of the important deadlines: 

Financial Aid: Apply beginning Oct. 1. No matter what type of college you’re planning to attend, it is highly encouraged you take the time to complete a FAFSA. After all, it is a determining factor for aid of all types, including grants, loans and even scholarships. The amount of aid awarded depends upon financial need, the cost to attend your chosen university and more. It’s free to complete, so why not?

Choices: Narrow down your college choices by Halloween. Start today by searching the internet for any college or university that may pique your interest. I encourage you to create a list of the top five to 10 things that are most important to you. These values could include a university that is close to home, affordable, offers incredible degree programs and student involvement opportunities. Then, check out a virtual or in-person campus tour, speak to an admissions counselor and/or navigate the university’s website. Doing so will help you narrow down your choices and identify your true fit.

Admission: Apply online by Thanksgiving. Admissions applications for prospective students are generally due at that time, unless the desired college has an open enrollment policy. I always tell students that submitting an admissions application is a fail-safe plan. It’s not until a student enrolls (upon acceptance) and has a class schedule that they are committed to said college or university. 

Scholarships: Apply by Presidents Day. The earlier you submit an admissions application, the sooner you’ll find out whether you are eligible for merit-based or first-year scholarships. But don’t stop there! You can also apply for national and local scholarships. Check with your high school, county, city, your parent/guardians, or your employer to discover if opportunities exist and when scholarship applications are due. If it’s only going to take, at most, an hour of your day to submit a scholarship essay to increase your chances for free money to cover some — if not all — of the cost of your education then it’s worth your time!

Registration: May begin around St. Patrick’s Day. If you followed these steps, you should have received a decision letter about your admission status. If you were accepted at an institution, generally class registration for your first college semester will begin around the springtime. The respective institution will be in touch about your full enrollment.

That’s it! All of this can easily be done in the comfort of your own home.

And as a friendly reminder, you do not have to do this alone. Your guidance counselor, your family and even folks at the college or university you’re considering, are there to help you through every step. And, of course, my virtual door is always open. 

You’ve got this!

Cindy Deng is an admissions counselor at Kent State University at Stark. You can reach her at cdeng@kent.edu or 330-244-3238.
 

Hate has no home here
Hate has no home here
Thursday, September 10, 2020

Thursday, Sept. 10, 2020

 
Dear Stark Campus community,
 
We take the right to free speech seriously. As Stark County’s public university, we welcome and encourage all forms of expression, with the exception of one. 
 
Hate has no place here. 
 
While some of you may be unfamiliar with the rock at the Kent Campus, many of you know that it has served as an icon of strength and a canvas for freedom of speech since the 1930s. In recent days, the rock has served as a tool for the cowardly delivery of hate speech. For that, we do not stand. 
 
We recognize and support the tenets of free speech, but there is a difference between hate speech, which flies in the face of our caring and compassionate community. 
 
What happens at the Kent Campus affects our entire university system. After all, we are one Kent State University, united by our academic pursuits. We are here to learn and grow, and prompt positive change. We, too, want to make a statement.  
 
We are encouraging our Stark Campus students to participate in this evening’s town hall, “Strategizing for Change: Revising the Rock”. The Town Hall is scheduled for 5 p.m. today, Sept. 10.

REGISTER FOR THE EVENT
 
A Town Hall for Action Against Racism for administrators, faculty, and staff, will be organized at a later date.
 
We look forward to an event organized by Stark Campus students Jaylon Smith, president of the Black Student Union, and Deborah Belintani Rosa, president of our International Students Organization. The goal of this student-organized event is to bring our campus together peacefully to send the message that, indeed, “Hate has no home here.”
 
While we do not have “The Rock” at Kent State University at Stark, we have a strong foundation. It is one built upon the Kent core values of kindness, respect, and purpose in all that we do. On that, we stand.
 
Sincerely,

Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Stark


 

Thursday, September 03, 2020

Justin Kilchenmann happy to present first student with Margaret Kilchenmann Memorial Scholarship.

Justin KilchenmannWhen I was an incoming freshman, I applied for and received the Charity Rotch Scholarship. In my essay, I said that I would tell students still in high school how important it was that they focus on their grades early, because it would determine the college they attended. I always felt guilty that I never did that, even though I said I would. In reality, things worked out very well for me. 

I was a lazy student in school, not particularly trying too hard, but getting decent grades. No matter how well I did in high school, I still would have found my way to Kent State University at Stark, because it had everything I was looking for: a college near home, with a good reputation, that allowed me to commute so that I could still work and save money by living with my parents.

I had so many good experiences at Kent State Stark. My first semester was a struggle, as I thought that I could put forth the same amount of effort and still do as well as I did in high school. That did not work. My second semester is when I really turned the corner and discovered a love of learning that is with me to this day. 

There were two College English II classes offered at the same time. I asked an advisor which one I should take, and he pointed to the one taught by Dr. Sharon Carson. What an amazing class! English was never one of my favorite classes, but Dr. Carson’s class is certainly one that changed my outlook on learning. She had a very distinctive smile and she smiled frequently. Seeing her smile always brought a smile to my face. 

We read “Double Indemnity” by James M. Cain and watched the movie of the same title starring Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck. To this day, it is the only novel I have ever enjoyed reading. We also read several short stories, including John Updike’s “A&P”. I have never enjoyed reading, but Dr. Carson found the perfect assortment of fiction. That was the only time in my life that I’ve enjoyed reading fiction.

My mother, Margaret Kilchenmann, never attended college, but it was important to her that her children do so. She always said that she did not care what we majored in, as long as we went to college. My sister, Kimberly, later attended Kent State Stark and graduated from Kent State with a bachelor’s degree in early childhood education. She went on to earn a graduate degree in education from Ashland University. She has taught elementary school in this country and internationally.  

Sadly, my mother died unexpectedly from complications of influenza in April 2018. At the time, I was finishing a master’s degree in accountancy from Emporia State University. She always asked how my classes were going, as I continued to take classes and earn degrees after moving off on my own and starting a career.  

Given how much she was interested in my education, I found it fitting that a scholarship would be the best way to ensure her memory lived on in the community. My parents provided my sister and me with a place to stay, food, and transportation while we were in college. We had to pay for our own tuition and books. While my sister had a much higher GPA in high school (and college) than me, and thus received quite a bit more in scholarships than I did, we both worked part-time to pay for our education costs and both graduated debt-free. Hopefully, the Margaret Kilchenmann Memorial Scholarship can help students like my sister and me.

Caitlin Brown QuoteAfter graduating from Kent State, I spent 14 years as an auditor for the federal government. My completion of a master’s degree in accountancy, three weeks following the death of my mother, gave me the desire to try what I’ve always dreamed of doing, and that’s to teach accounting. I applied to three positions never expecting to be interviewed, but I am very fortunate that one university called me.  

I am now in my “junior” year of teaching accounting.  My style in the classroom, to a great extent, emulates many of the wonderful professors I had at Kent State Stark. Thanks to the impact Dr. Carson had on me, I speak to my students frequently about the importance of smiling. 

It is hard to be sad when you have a smile on your face!

This is the first year the Margaret Kilchenmann Memorial Scholarship will be awarded. Find out more about scholarships at Kent State Stark by visiting www.kent.edu/stark/scholarships
 

 

A message from the Dean
A message from the Dean
Thursday, August 27, 2020

Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020

 
Dear students,
 
Today we welcome you with open arms to Kent State University at Stark. Whether you are joining us in the classroom or from your dining room, the quality education we will provide to you this semester is a certainty you can count on.
 
During these unprecedented times, we turn to the consistency a university education can provide. We are the hometown choice. You’ve made the best decision by refusing to put your education on pause, especially during a time when so much of our world is at a standstill. Please take comfort in knowing that you are moving forward in a positive direction.
 
After all, the decisions you make today impact tomorrow’s journey. We are here for you all along the way. You can find answers to your most frequently asked questions at our website. Find our Flashes Safe Seven principles here.  We must work together to stay safe and healthy.
 
Your professors join me as we welcome you today.  We are certain you are ready to learn and excel, but also adapt, over the course of the semester.  While excellence in education is always our North Star; flexibility will be our guiding light.
 
Trust us, we’re here for you.
 
I’ve witnessed how this campus community comes together in the face of adversity.  We overcome.  No one would have guessed that when we kicked off 2020, we would be operating in a largely virtual world by mid-March.
 
While learning environments are different, our high standards remain the same.  We are working tirelessly to come up with new ways to connect students with one another, faculty, and staff, and to enjoy the close-knit community that makes Kent State Stark unique.
 
I want you to know that I am so proud of each of you as we begin this new academic year together.  Wishing you a productive and healthy start to this semester.
 
Welcome, Flashes!
 
Sincerely,

Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Stark


 

Welcome Kit
Saturday, August 15, 2020

Welcome Kit article banner
 
Hello, Kent State Stark Flashes!
 
All students taking in-person classes, working at or visiting a Kent State University campus will receive a Flashes Take Care of Flashes Welcome Kit that provides you with safety essentials.

WELCOME KIT CONTENTS

  • Flashes Safe Seven postcard
  • KSU Student Pledge Card
  • Two washable face coverings
  • Forehead thermometer strips
  • Antibacterial hand sanitizer gel
  • Sanitizing wipes
  • A clean key
  • Drawstring bag 

WELCOME KIT DISTRIBUTION

  • Students can pick up their welcome kits in the Office of Student Services, 132 Main Hall, during open office hours.
  • If you are picking up your parking hang tag or FLASHcard, you must show a photo ID.

QUESTIONS

Office of Student Services
132 Main Hall
330-244-3251

If you’re unable to attend, you can stop by Student Services in Main Hall during open hours beginning Aug. 26 to pick up your kit.
 
 

Fall semester tuition is due on Friday, Aug. 7.
Thursday, July 30, 2020

While a college education is an investment in your future, we all understand it requires some financial juggling. If you need assistance with your tuition, please don’t hesitate to contact our Financial Aid experts. We’re here to help!
 
Fall semester tuition payments were due Friday, Aug. 7. We have several ways you can pay:

  • Use our convenient online pay option. All credit card payments must be made online. Checks can be processed online at no additional cost.
  • The cashiering booth in Student Services at 132 Main Hall will be open the following dates and hours:
     

    IN-PERSON CASHIERING AVAILABLE IN
    STUDENT SERVICES, 132 MAIN HALL

     DATE  TIME
     Wednesday, Aug. 12  1 to 5 p.m.
     Thursday, Aug. 13  1 to 5 p.m.
     Friday, Aug. 14  1 to 5 p.m.

As always, when on campus, please remember to follow our Flashes Safe Seven principles. Face coverings and appropriate physical distancing are required when in campus buildings.

Thank you, Flashes!
 
Your Student Services Team
330-499-9600

Kent State Stark graduate, RedHawk entrepreneur Blake Gibbs manufactures PPEs during pandemic
Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Just a Kid from Hartville

The hot sun beat on the pavement as customers, wheelers and dealers scurried around the crowded Hartville Flea Market. A small group of curious shoppers gathered around the “ZingAnything” booth, manned by several Lake High School students. 

Blake Gibbs knew then he was on to something. While outsiders may have seen “just a kid from Hartville” with a newfangled gadget, this 15-year-old budding entrepreneur had an eye for new products. 

And, in 2012, fruit-infused water was just beginning to trend. The ZingAnything water bottle, designed by Gibbs and his cousin Josh Lefkovitz, provided users the option of taking any fruit or vegetable to add a little flavor and extra health benefits to plain ole H2O. 

In the months and years that followed, ZingAnything became an enterprise, offering customers 30 different, innovative fruit-infusion products. The water bottles were eventually sold nationally at Brookstone, Walmart, Target, Sam’s Club, QVC and more. Gibbs and his partner were approached twice by ABC Network to be on “Shark Tank”, first for the ZingAnything products and second for the iTens electrical therapy device they later developed. Since then, ZingAnything has been sold to a larger corporation, and the duo’s iTens device is being sold by pharmaceutical companies. 

These days, Gibbs, a recent 2020 Kent State University at Stark graduate, has used the business knowledge learned early on as a springboard for an opportunity spurred by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. 

Gibbs currently works for Brighteye Innovations, a large corporation in Akron that owns many subsidiary companies including the one he works for, Pain Management Technologies (PMT) Medical. In the last two years, Gibbs started RedHawk Supply, the business arm that contracts with the government. As it did for nearly all businesses, the global pandemic changed everything, and RedHawk’s main goals became manufacturing and distributing personal protective equipment (PPE) all over the United States. 

“We were able to, in a short span, pivot the entire company,” said Gibbs. “What was interesting was we were all able to adapt. We are a team of 15 people here in Akron. Everybody was able to step up to the plate, and I think that goes to show the type of people that we have at our company who were willing to go above and beyond. A lot of us work seven days a week, 16-hour days – for two months I did that.”

Still a Kent State Stark student at the time, Gibbs recalled the expanse of it all, “I was sitting in (Applied Communication professor) Patrick Dillon’s class never thinking that…I’d be chartering a plane to fly to Asia to pick up millions of masks, face shields, gloves, hand sanitizer and thermometers.”

PPE has been distributed from RedHawk Supply to businesses large and small, locally and nationally, and they are prepared if and when cases rise again. Although he could not give an exact number, Gibbs noted that the number of supplies distributed by the company is in the millions and continues to increase. 

“I think my favorite experience from this was being able to, not necessarily travel during a pandemic, but load up planes and deliver the product to strategic places throughout the U.S.,” he said. “Being able to give that product…to somebody who has to be on the front lines and continue to keep the country moving, that’s a huge thing that, as a Hartville kid, I never would have thought I’d be in a situation where I’m able to help other people and help them in a way that no one else could.”

As people and companies continue to need PPE, Gibbs and his company will be there, and we have a feeling they would agree — he’s more than just a kid from Hartville.


 

A message from the Dean
A message from the Dean
Thursday, July 02, 2020

Dear students,
 
In what seems like a world of uncertainty right now, there are still some things that you can count on. One of those is the assurance that Your Hometown University will provide safe options for you this fall so that you can continue on the path toward earning your college degree. I want you to know that every decision we make is driven by our commitment to the health, safety and well-being of students, faculty and staff.
 
Earlier this week, you received an email from the University Registrar concerning changes to the Fall 2020 schedule. As is the case on the Kent Campus, the majority of classes offered by the Stark Campus will be taught remotely. Some of these classes will include voluntary activities, like meeting with a small discussion group or attending a lecture, that could be held on campus. Remote classes will be taught through Blackboard utilizing a combination of asynchronous, self-paced activities, and synchronous sessions, which will take place in real time through videoconferencing. This technology will allow you to see and hear your professors and interact with fellow students. 
 
Our goal for remote classes is to replicate the unique, close-knit community that is the heart of KSU Stark. Now, more than ever, we need to remain connected with one another.
 
A small number of classes will be scheduled for delivery on campus. These courses will mostly take place in laboratory or studio settings and will be offered in Art, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geology, Music, Nursing, and other areas. Students who come to campus for these classes, as well as the entire faculty and staff of KSU Stark, must adhere to our Flashes Safe Seven principles because we want our campus to remain open and for all of you to be safe.
 
Computer labs will be open and available, along with practice rooms in the Fine Arts Building, our library, the Recreation and Wellness Center, and other resources that will help you to thrive. You are going to come together with friends and faculty. We are all in this together, united by an incredible academic institution. 
 
This global pandemic is no rival to the world-class education that will continue to take place right here in Stark County. At Kent State University at Stark, there’s no place for pause.
 
We are full go.
 
Here’s what you should know:

  • The fall schedule is now set. You can check your schedule in FlashLine by clicking on the Student tab on the left-hand side. You can register for courses in FlashLine by clicking on Student > Courses and Registration > Look Up and Register for Classes.
     
  • We will begin classes on Aug. 27, 2020, utilizing a remote format this fall, with some in-person components. Sometime this summer, you be hearing more from the professors teaching your fall classes.
     
  • We plan to end all in-person instruction on Nov. 20, 2020, with remaining instruction, study sessions, and final examinations moving remotely for the remainder of the semester.
     
  • This plan is designed to address epidemiologic models that suggest a potential resurgence in COVID-19 cases in late November/early December. Because of this new schedule, we will forego the fall break that had been planned for Oct. 15-18.

Our Student Services team is here to meet you where you are. We can advise you on everything from your class schedule to financial aid. Don’t miss our Virtual Drop-In Sessions beginning next week. 
 
We are creating an environment that’s flexible enough that, no matter what the future may hold, we are going to help you move forward. 
 
Together, we will navigate these new challenges. COVID-19 will not win this battle as we claim our present – and our future. We will most certainly see Flashes of brilliance as we embark on this new academic year together. That, you can count on.

 
Sincerely,

Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Stark


 

Monday, June 29, 2020

Due to several significant factors related to the COVID-19 pandemic, it is with a heavy heart that the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce announces the cancellation of the 2020 Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival Balloon Classic scheduled for July 31-Aug. 2 and the Up, Up & Away 5K scheduled for Aug. 1.

The decision follows discussions with university leadership, as well as health and safety officials, regarding the feasibility of holding these two large community events in the current climate. After exploring multiple options, all were in agreement it is not possible to mitigate the magnitude of the logistical challenges required to successfully produce the events, while adhering to the guidelines mandated by the State of Ohio, as well as Kent State University’s official, multi-phased return-to-campus plan that does not permit in-person events until at least mid-August.

While cancelling these events is deeply disappointing for everyone involved, ultimately the health and safety of the attendees and participants, vendors, sponsors, entertainment, staff, volunteers and event partners must come first.

“We support our Chamber partners in this decision. Public health is our utmost concern as we all work together to slow the spread of COVID-19 in the community,” said Denise A. Seachrist, dean and chief administrative officer at Kent State Stark. “While we will miss these spectacular summer events, held on our beautiful, 200-acre campus each year, we’ll look forward to celebrating with our community in 2021.”

For more information about the Balloon Classic and Up, Up & Away 5K, please contact Joanne Murray, vice president of community events and sponsorships, Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, at 330-458-2050 or joannem@cantonchamber.org.
 

Friday, June 26, 2020

Marlington Dukes’ star forward Leah Springer knows what it means to give back to her hometown. And, for this basketball standout, “giving back” is more than just a few words, it’s a way of life.

That’s why this stellar scholar athlete, who has volunteered since childhood, was named the winner of Kent State University at Stark’s Hometown Flash Award at the virtual 2020 Best of Stark Preps.

Leah SpringerWhen asked about Springer’s accomplishments, Mike Stadulis, head coach of Marlington High School’s girls basketball team, pointed out the list is seemingly endless – ranging from varsity letters in basketball, volleyball and softball, to numerous district honors and academic achievements, including National Honor Society. This year, Springer also received the basketball team’s “Whatever it takes” award. 

But her work doesn’t end there. In the community, she serves in the church nursery at First Friends Church, volunteers for the Alliance City Backpack Giveaway and was named a Washington Ruritan Rising Senior. That’s just to name a few.

“We are pleased to present Leah Springer with the Hometown Flash Award,” said Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., dean and chief administrative officer at Kent State University at Stark. “This Hometown Flash has done what it takes to excel on and off the court. Leah has balanced rigorous academics; earning college credits through our College Credit Plus (CCP) program, and is a proven leader in her hometown.”

Springer was one of the numerous area high school students taking part in the popular program, which introduces students to the transformational power of higher education. This fall, the CCP program at Kent State Stark will enroll more local students.

Springer said she is honored to receive the Hometown Flash Award and plans to continue to give back to her community. 

“I’ve always known it was a good thing, to give back to others and give back to your community whenever you can,” she said.

She’s learned that lesson from her family, including her parents Scott and Kim Springer. “My parents have always taught me to give back. No matter where we go off in life, we should always remember where we came from. I’m proud to call Alliance my hometown.” 

 
Home and away, Kent State Stark provides students with the keys to drive their collegiate journey and make it their own. That’s thanks to an affordable, world-class education right in Stark County. 

For more than 70 years, that has been the goal of Kent State Stark – Your Hometown University – providing the community with the education necessary to meet their dreams head-on. 

“We work to change lives through the education we provide,” said Seachrist. “During these unprecedented times, we offer students a safe, affordable and quality option. Our credits seamlessly transfer to other universities; something to keep in mind as students are considering their hometown options for the upcoming year – and beyond.”
 

Friday, June 19, 2020

Kent State University at Stark has announced its Dean’s List and President’s List for the spring 2020 semester. 

Requirements for the Dean’s List include a 3.40 grade point average or above for the spring 2020 semester and at least 12 letter-graded (A, B, etc.) credit hours completed by the end of the semester.

President’s List criteria are a 4.00 grade point and at least 15 letter-graded credit hours completed by the end of the semester.

A part-time Dean's List follows the President's and Dean's List.
 

SPRING 2020 PRESIDENT'S* & DEAN'S LIST

The following students have been named to the Kent State Stark Dean’s List. Those students designated with a star (*) have been named to the Kent State University President’s List. 

Corban Aaron
Michelle Abel
Samuel Aegerter
Julianne Agnone*
Evangeline Agum
Elizabeth Ainsworth
Ali Al-Ali*
Brianna Allen
Morgan Allen
Lauren Almes*
Brittany Alterio
Emily Anderson
Ryan Andrie
Monica Arnold
Vincent Arrigo
Joseph Artimez
Mackenzie Ash
Cade Aten
Rachel Bachman
Maya Bachtel*
Abigail Bacon
Spencer Bagwell
Kate Bailey
Brooke Baker
Robert Baker
Tyler Baker*
Cameron Balca
Julia Banks
Nicholas Banner
Michaela Banta
Chí Barrino-Goins
Rachel Bartsch
Elaine Bast
Leslie Bast*
Samantha Battista
Mason Batty
Amanda Baxter
Rachel Beam
Jazmin Beard
Steven Beck
Autumn Bell
Caroline Bennett
Daniel Berens*
Lauren Beris
Veronica Bingham
Brandy Bishop
Bryce Black
Matthew Blanton
Joshua Blasko
Marisa Bleininger
Nicole Bobbs
Ashley Boggs
Joshua Boggs*
Jacob Bohon
Joshua Boley*
Toni Boling
Leah Bolyard
Juliana Borsellino
Sydney Boser
Jason Bosley
Michael Bowman
Tyler Boyd
Constance Bozeman
Jeffery Bratanov
Jacob Brent
Makenzea Briggs
Mara Brinker*
Jonathan Brooke
Jaycie Brooks
Derek Brown
Samantha Brown
Selah Brown
Amanda Browning*
Jordan Browning*
Dora Brumbaugh
Thomas     Bullock
Tyler Bulone
Skylar Busche
Brent Butler
Raegan Butler
Seana Byard
Donovan Byler
Arikah Cady
Gregory Cain
Scott Caldwell
Elizabeth Callahan
Jamie Campbell*
Maylee Cannon*
Noah Cantera
Chaz Capps
Hannah Carnes
Alyssa Card*
Dominic Carosielli
Bethany Carr
Benjamin Carretta
Christina Carroll
Morgan Casper*
Matthew Carson
Katelyn Carter
Taylor Carter
Clay Casper
Pablo Castillo Gomez
Carissa Casto-Leglise
Chloe Chapman
Megan Chatelain
Kylee Cheatwood
Rachael Childs
Lea Ciavarella
Regan Cirtwill
Madelyn Clair
Anthony Clement
Emily Clemson
Megan Click
Miranda Click
Makayla Clos*
Hannah Coblentz
Benjamin Cochran
Colton Cochran*
Brooke Coleman
Kylie Collmar
Hannah Conley
Kiersten Congrove*
Kathryn Connair
Katarina Converse
Christopher Cook
Morgan Cottrell*
Bradley Cottrill
Jenna Covalesky*
Amanda Cox*
Sean Craney
Teresa Crater
Parker Crawford
Katie Cua
Isabelle Cullen
Britney Cupery
Anthony Curati
Shelby Curlutu
Nicole Cvammen
Zachery Daisher
Nicholas Dame
Donovan Davis*
Trever Davis
Lexianne De Leon
Jordan Debois
Loren Deck
Samuel DeDominicis
Jacob Demaree
Ashley Dennison
Sean Dick
Tessa DiFrancesco
Chloe Dimario
Dillon Donaldson
Catherine Draa
Gina Driggers
Samantha Drobney
Evan Dukeman
Cassandra Duplin
Delayna Durr
Lucas Eastep
Conrad Edmisten
Abigail Eitman
Keihle Elersic
Theodore ElFaye
Miranda Etheredge
Isabella Eugeneau
Jacob Ewing
Allison Eyster
Macie Faigley
Alex Farabaugh
Kimberly Faust
Taylor Fedor
Kayla Fell
Julia Fenbers
Erin Fenk
Chelsea Fernandez
Stacey Ferrell*
Grace Film
Derek Firth
Zane Fisher
Michelle Fitz
Sarah Flower
Katie Flynn*
Nathan Fontes
Tristan Ford
Jack Forsyth
Maria Fortseras
Amanda Fowler*
Shawn Fowler
Samuel Fraelich
Brittani Frick*
Kayden Fricke
Hannah Fricker
Brittany Friedrich
Dillon Fulton
Tessa Fusko
Casey Gallagher
Paige Gallina
Rachel Garritano
Ryan Gavorcik
Samuel Gentile
Zoe Gibson*
Mackenzie Gilliland
Christina Gillmore
James Glass
Alessandra Gnecco Sarmiento
Maliq Goncalves
Emily Gordon
Desarae Gorney
Victoria Graves
Thomas Gray
Audrey Graytok
Josiah Gregory
Ross Grismer
Mariah Groetz
Ashley Grove
Daniel Groves
Kyle Gruber
Jordan Haas
Sara Haidet
McKenzie Haidet
Timothy Haines
Nathan Halasinski
Elijah Hall
Mary Hammel*
Brian Hampe
Seth Harbert
Kassidy Harkness
Lydia Harless
Williemina Harmon
Donielle Harrington
Kelly Harter*
Meghan Harter
Christian Hartley
Zachary Haskell
Chelsea Hatfield
Sydney Hathaway
Nick Hayden
Bethany Haynes
Morgan Heaton
Rebecca Heisler
Paige Henman
Paige Henson
Chase Henzel
Casey Herndon
Erin Hershberger
Joshua Hershberger*
Riley Hershberger
Raini Hershey
Matthew Herttna
Frank Hill
Imari Hill
Caitlyn Hilliard
Brock Himmelheber
Wyatt Hines
Jennifer Hinton
Martaysia Holland
Austyn Holt
Skylyn Hooks
Mason Hoopingarner
Nicholas Hoover
Tyler Hopfensperger
Tyler Horn
Ottie Hosler
Elizabeth Hout*
Neil Hoxworth
Ean Hudspeth
Danielle Hunter
Robert Husted
Kaitlyn Hutt
Leanna Iden
Brandon Jacobs
Logan Jacobs
Samantha Jacoby
Jordan Jamison
Chase Jeffries
Alec Johnson
Chase Johnson
Emma Johnson
Hanna Jones
Jalen Johnson
Jessa Johnson
Kia Jones
Matthew Jones
Sean Jordan
Trinity Judy
Lucas Kail
Jaden Kandel
Mary Karcher
Kristi Karickhoff
Ryan Kast*
Merlayna Kauffman
Jillian Keen
Skylar Keirn
Erin Kelly
Dylan Kelsey
Cole Kern
Joshua Kerr
Wasomi Khewa
Alivia Kinney*
Donna Kitchens
Abigail Klein
Kelsee Kleinhenz
Peyton Knight
Jaret Knox
Destany Knutty
Adalina Kohr
Ember Kommel*
Caleb Kovach
Nicole Kovatch
Zachary Kramarich
Jacob Kritzell
Nicholas Kunzen
Madeline Kurtz
Alexis Lake
Ian Lamb
Kaleigh Lamson
Eric Landrum
Julian Larew
Erika Lear*
Chad Leatherberry*
Ivy Lee
Nicholas Leeders
Miranda Legg
Ashley Lehmier
Hannah Lemons
Jeffry Lengel
Alivia Lepley
Jewell Lewis
Aubrey Lightfoot
Morgan Lineweaver
Rishma Lingden
Kevin Little
Claire Loffarelli
Jacob Logozzo
Madelyn Lombardi
Mercedes Lombardi
Brenden Longwell*
Christian Lucas
Payton Lutz
Jordan Lyden
Mason Madenfort
Jenna Maher*
Julia Majzun
Mary Mallett
Kayla Maloof
Landen Marchand
Brehana Margazano
Audrey Marquette
Nicole Marran
Macy Martin*
Eric Martinez
Crystal Martinez-Jacome
Robyn Marx
Logan Mast
Kyelynn Mastri
Daniel Maurer
Nicholas Mauser*
Tejasvini Mavuleti
Schyler Maxhimer
Jessica May
Robert McBride*
Breanna McCartney*
Margaret McCartney
Stephanie McCartney
Caitlin McCaslin
Tyler McClellan
Gavin McCloskey
Dennis McCracken
Anthony McCray
Megan McDaniel
Maria McDonald*
Sierra McElwain
Corrie McHone
Tessa McInturf
Catherine McKelroy
Leeann McKenna
Aleah McKenzie
Braden McLean
Dylan Mease
Kaitlyn Mease
Victoria Menches
Dominic Merlitti
Brittney Merritt
Kelsey Merritt*
Hannah Messner
Madison Meszaros
Thomas Metz
Katelynn Meyer*
Moses Michael
Benjamin Mikulik
Amanda Miller*
Brice Miller
Ellie Miller
Hailey Miller
Kaleb Miller
Katherine Miller
Leah Miller
Justin Mills
Rachell Miterko
Elliana Mizener
Katelyn Mizener
Mark Moldovan
Brianna Moore
Kennedy Moore
Lynnita Moore
Madeline Moore
Madison Moore*
Micaelah Morgan Abdul-Ali
Jessica Morton*
Shanae Moss
Tyler Mull
David Mullett
Sabrina Murch
Taylor Murray
Brittany Myers
Carlie Myers
Jacob Myers
Olivia Nagy
Dharma Nason
Joshua Nason
Clay Neisel
Dylan Nesbitt
Jonathan Newsome
Skylar Nicholson
Sean Nims
Ashley Norris
Joshua Norris
Paige Norton
Brendin Nourse
Daniel O’Connor
Taylor O’Donnell
Brittany Ohler
Dylan Ohm
Olivia Okress
Taylor O’Lear
Joan Oster
Luke Overmire
Katelyn Paolucci
Gabrielle Parcher
Rachel Parker
Charles Parsons*
Kara Parsons*
Rutvi Patel
Delaney Patterson
Mary Peach
Adela Pearcy
Terri Pelger
Jacob Penrod
Zach Petroff
Haley Pettit
Karlee Pezzano
Jason Phillips
Trey Phillips
Allison Pierce
Renee Pike
Macey Pope
Micaela Pope
Allison Portman
Brandon Post
Nicholas Prince
Matthew Proffitt
Brooke Provance
Ashley Rader
Alexandros Ramos
Reis Rankin
Kayla Rauschenbach
Michael Rector
Stephanie Redmond
Shaun Reed
Alexis Reese
Jade Reynolds
Isabella Rich
Rylie Rich
Sarah Richards
Leeanne Ridgley
Samantha Riffle*
Trevor Rimmele
Austin Ritts
Liam Roach
Amanda Roberts*
John Robison*
Lauren Rooney*
Miranda Rosato
Savanna Rosato
Tyler Ross
Brittany Roush
Neil Ruble
Steven Rudder*
Kaitlyn Rueschman
Jacob Rummell*
Gabrielle Russo
Kayla Saffell
Jaquiez Sampson
Jonathan Sams
Emma Sanders
Elizabeth Sanner
Thomas Sarver
Joseph Schermesser
James Schindewolf*
Samantha Schippert
Robert Schreffler
Michaela Schroeder
Joshua Seefong
Blake Seifert
Brenna Seifert
Katherine Seiter
Aaron Shaffer
Summer Shaffer
Joel Sharkey
Katie Shatzer
Madison Shaw
Brennan Shirley
Taylor Short
John Shoup
Shannon Simonson
Savanna Simpson
Samantha Skowron
Gabrielle Skyllas
Patiance Sloan
Ciara Slusser
Dylanni Smith
Jordan Smith
Keith Smith
Zachariah Smith
Brandy Snyder*
Zachary Snyder
Samantha Soisson
Megan Somerick
Matthew Sorensen
Brittany Spangler
Sarah Speicher*
Emily Spencer
Liam Spencer
Bailey Spring
Brianna Sprout
Jo Ann Stanley
Marissa Stelluto
Daniel Stephan
Kylee Stevens
Erin Stewart*
Mackenzie Stewart
Natajah Stokes
Alyssa Storz
Evelyn Striejewske
Madison Swartzentruber*
Alexander Sweeney
Hallie Swonger
Trinity Tackett
Ana Tahir
Lauren Tarver
Gabrielle Tausch
Alexis Taylor
Camille Tenney
Delaney Thomas*
Emily Thomas
Alex Thompson
Samantha Thorpe
Abigail Thouvenin
Jaime Tobin
Kali Todich
Nicholas Tomola
Madalynn Triner
Tanner Triner
Ann Trissel
Morgan Tropf
Marcia Trouts*
Tara Tucci
Taylor Ulichney
Lana Ulrich
Kaitlyn Unklesbay*
Lindsay Vance
Tyler VanNatten
Hannah Vaughn
McKenna Vega
Corey Velasquez
Joe Viront
Emily Vossen
Laura Wadsworth
Kaitlyn Wallace
Hannah Wallis
Sharon Walsh
Tatum Walulik
Sylvia Ward
Joshua Warren
Autumn Wassam
Rachel Watson
Hailey Weaver
Malia Weaver
Taylor Weaver*
Jodan Weber
Hailey Weidlich
Adrienne Weiner
Sarah Weinstock*
Matthew Weller
Jake Wells
Madelyn Wells
Nathan Wells
David Wertz
Dylan Weygandt*
Emma Whalen
Christopher Whisenant
Carlie Whisner
Gregory White
Bryan Whitten
Maddison Wichman
Justin Wilcox
Brooke Wilkinson
Jason Williams
Jenna Williams*
Lindsay Williams
Natalie Williams
Mikayla Wirkki
Randall Wise
Luke Wohlford
Samantha Wolford
Miles Woodling
Elizabeth Woods
Stephanie Wrest
Samuel Wright
Olivia Yoder
Alexander Yost
Selah Yost
Garrett Young
Maggie Zaleski*
Jordan Ziss
Spencer Zolla
 

SPRING 2020 PART-TIME DEAN'S LIST

The following have been named to the Dean’s List for part-time students:

Madison Adams
Sara Alam
Sumayah Al-Dobaishi
Anastasia Allison
Sarah Amatangelo
Leah Andaloro
Owen Anstine
Taylor App
Joshua Armstrong
Shane Baker
Kaitlynn Bamler
Mercedes Baxter
Paige Bazaar
Victor Berni
Hannah Bernier
Jacob Berry
Crue Bingham
Alexis Black
Noah Blaz
Nathan Blough
Karrie Bluck
Carol Blundell
Isabelle Bosler
Jillian Boston
Ariel Bradford
Abigail Breiding
Parker Brennan
Tiffany Brown
Alexander Burkhart
Morgan Campbell
Andrew Carozza
Claire Carpenter
Kaylee Carruthers
Marcia Casey
Molly Chamier
Makayla Chandler
Emily Christmas
Mykenna Creager
Nathan Cutlip
Rebecca Cutright
Madison D’Avello
Grace Davies
Crystal Dell
Kate Dick
Ella Dipold
Madeline Dodson
Marc Dottavio
DeLynn Drescher
Sarah Dudek
Samuel Dunlevy
Madison Earlenbaugh
Dakota Eckenrode
Emily Eckhart
Annabelle Ehmer
Nancy Ely
Courtland Faulkner
Kristen Flinner
Nicholas Flory
Kohen Foster
Andrea Frank
Matison Froehlich
Graceann Fryer
Elena Gartrell
Angelina Globokar
Giavonna Globokar
Dakota Gordon
Hailey Gross
Madison Gross
Joseph Grutzmacher
Paige Hammer
Morgan Hancock
Claire Haswell
April Hazaimeh
Dominic Heller
Danielle Herouvis
Grace Hibbs
William Hibbs
Cassidy Higgins
Lisa Holder
Casandra Hoolihan
Blaine Horvath
Sarah Hughes
Elizabeth Husk
Angela Ice
Alexandra Kapper
Christopher Kessell
Maxwell Kirby
Anna Kish
Lisa Klauka
Riley Kline
Luke Kneidel
Kimberly Kroh
Jeremy Ladd
Nia Lambdin
Isabella Lamparty
Delan Lara
Ian Lara
Abigail Lattea
Christine Lawver
Anthony Leighton
Jessica Lippert
Kelley Little
Alejandro Llewellyn
John Lohrman
Morgan Lower
Jacob Lupardus
Erica Machan
Dana Magella
Alex Martino
Jennifer May
Dakota Mazon
Katherine McBee
Katherine McMullen
Courtney Merrin
Joseph Middleton
Caleb Miller
Christian Miller
Kayla Miller
Rachel Mohr
Nash Monroe
G Moore
Julia Moore
Aiden Morgan
Scarlet Muncey
Abigail Murphy
Erin Murphy
Brent Newsom
Shelby Nicely
Ryan Nims
Jory Oakleaf
Matthew Oster
Chloe Palfy
Joseph Partridge
Alexis Paulo-Roberts
Blake Pearsall
Alexis Pena
Hannah Petersen
Melissa Phillips
Megan Pirigyi
Kaleb Powlison
Jonathan Raynes
Monica Reinhart
Grace Renier
Megan Rice
Walker Riley
Ann Marie Riley-Nees
Leah Rogers
Micah Rose
Lucas Ruegg
Winnie Russ
McKenna Ryan
Lexa Saia
Shannon Sammons
Nicholas Sampsel
Mary Sandlin
Jordan Scheufler
Gavin Schlaubach
Marina Schneider
Hunter Seachrist
Kiley Seal
Jessie Sedlock
Amber Shaffer
Brittany Shaw
Rebecca Shields
Tori Sickafoose
Natalie Siglow
Lauren Simon
Nicholas Sirohman
Nancy Sirrine
Hadil Smiley
Kasidy Smith
Christine Stalder
Nathanial Stephens
Phylicia Stickler
Amir Stokes
Ronald Stokoe
Jaimie Stone
Olivia Storad
Anne Taylor
Edwin Torres Alvarado
Brianna Walko
Michael Warner
Shannon Watson
Rachael Wayts
Jyllien Welk
Emily Wells
Makenzie Westfall
Brian Wilkerson
Alexis Williams-Doss
Alex Winters
Lauren Wirt
Michael Wolfe
Maxwell Wolford
Amanda Yarosik
Evan Yost
Brittany Zampelli
Alexandra Zanin
Reagan Zehnder
Dawn Zuniga


 

Thursday, June 04, 2020

Dear campus community,

We are witnessing a pivotal, defining moment in our nation’s history. Everyday people have taken to the streets of their cities and to their social media platforms to demand change with passion and unity.  

Our unwavering hope is that this will result in a true shift to establish fairness in a system that is inherently unfair. For generations, institutionalized racism has bestowed either privilege or disenfranchisement based solely on one’s skin color. The disparity is real; it must no longer be ignored.

We’ve rallied before in this country, but this time it feels different, because it is different.  

Coming amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the struggle is compounded. Social distancing and fear have caused all of us to experience loss and pain. We are grieving our old routines, and we must acknowledge that. However, we must not wallow in self-pity; we must unify and take positive action. We must focus on one another: our country, our state, our community, our campus. It is going to take all of us working together to stand up for those whose voices have long gone unheard.  

Like you, I am deeply saddened by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. I ponder why these senseless acts of violence keep happening in our country.  

I was just a little girl when the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated more than 50 years ago now. And it’s difficult to believe that nearly 30 years have passed since our nation witnessed the 1992 Los Angeles riots unfold, a response to the brutal beating of Rodney King.  

Unconscionable acts of violence started long before MLK was killed and have continued to the present day. The list of victims is seemingly endless. Earlier this year, my heart sank when I heard of the death of Ahmaud Arbery, a young black man who was murdered while out for a jog in February.

As a fellow runner, I declare with heartfelt sincerity, “Maud, I run with you.”  

And as dean of the Stark Campus, with so many students driven to enter the healthcare field, I was heartbroken over the tragic loss of 26-year-old EMT Breonna Taylor in March.   

The violence must stop.  

While I did not have the opportunity to hear the great Dr. King call for the end of violence so many years ago, I am thankful that my mother did.  In 1958, she, along with three of her friends, set out on a road trip to hear him speak at Purdue University. These progressive women journeyed 350 miles from their rural Columbiana County homes, leaving young children in the care of their fathers for three days. It was remarkable for the time.

My mother kept in her library a booklet she obtained on that trip, “The Measure of a Man.” As I grew older, I read its timeless words. King wrote that America had strayed from its promises of equality outlined in the Declaration of Independence into a “far country of segregation and discrimination.”

King said: “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

King wrote that while we are all “merely men,” we have the potential to discover ourselves, our neighbors and realize our collective interdependence as we strive for purpose, togetherness, and a path where every man, woman and child are treated equally and with dignity.

As dean of Kent State University at Stark, I can assure you that we are deeply committed to this premise. We are deeply committed to equity.  To our students, faculty, and staff of color, we are here for you, and we hear you. The work of dismantling the structures of prejudice and the legacy of racism in this country is something we all must engage in. The administration will take steps to ensure our campus is advantageous for all, disparaging for none. 

We are unwaveringly hopeful and we dare to dream, Dr. King, that an indelible shift is taking place in this nation.  

Today, we kneel in honor of George Floyd and countless others. And, then, we stand. Together. Because black lives matter.

 
Sincerely,

Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Stark


 

Monday, June 01, 2020

Dear Golden Flashes,

Over the last several months, Kent State University faculty, staff and leadership have been consulting with local and national authorities as well as our own health experts as we work to develop a return-to-campuses plan that ensures, to the greatest extent possible, the health and safety of all members of the Kent State community.

Let me begin by reiterating the precepts that guide our planning. Our plans must protect the health and safety for everyone in our university community; reflect the values and mission of Kent State; and allow our students to be successful, our employees to thrive and our scholars to be innovative and creative.

We plan to resume residential living and a number of in-person classes in August. Although we will be together in person, there will be notable differences during the next school year. Students will likely enroll in a combination of face-to-face and remotely taught courses.

Also, we will eliminate Fall Break and move to fully remote instruction for the two remaining weeks in the semester after Thanksgiving. This will reduce the amount of travel to and from campuses, which reduces the potential spread of the virus. Other fall 2020 academic calendar changes are under study. If at any time during the semester the pandemic worsens, we will be prepared to move all instruction to remote learning.

While we will not have a Fall Break this coming semester, we recognize the importance of student mental health and will continue to enhance student mental health services this upcoming academic year. At any time, students may access mental health support services through our Step Up and Speak Out initiative.

It is important to reiterate, whether you are currently on campus or returning during our phased plans to reopen, all Kent State community members are required to adhere to the Flashes Safe Seven principles to ensure the safety of our community. Following these safety principles is the single most important action any of us can take to remain healthy and protect our fellow Flashes. We plan to provide two reusable cloth masks for every student and employee.

To prepare for a return to campuses, the planning group has outlined a phased approach for students, faculty and staff.

ACCESS PHASES FOR RETURNING TO CAMPUSES  VIEW OUR FLASHES SAFE SEVEN PRINCIPLES

While these plans are subject to change as we monitor developments with the virus, they will guide our continued preparations. Additional details of the plan are forthcoming, including information about contact tracing, virus testing, and quarantine and isolation protocols.

Employees currently working remotely should continue to do so until additional guidance is provided by their supervisor. Staff members will return to campus at different times, depending on their roles and responsibilities. Some employees may continue to work remotely as their role allows, possibly beyond the beginning of fall semester. Supervisors will receive additional information shortly.

We understand how important it is that decisions be made as soon as possible regarding which specific classes will be delivered in person or remotely. Virtually every part of the university is working diligently to identify feasible academic solutions given the constraints driven by the COVID-19 pandemic.

As always, University Health Services is open and available to answer questions about COVID-19 and safe practices at 330-672-2322, or after hours, contact the Kent State Nurse Line at 330-672-2326.

My heartfelt thanks to all faculty, staff and students whose great work is shaping our plan to come together as a community. Thank you all for your patience as we prepare for a safe return to on-campus activities and the start of fall semester. We must all be diligent in our actions to protect the health of every member of our community.

Sincerely,

Manfred van Dulmen, Ph.D.
Interim Associate Provost for Academic Affairs
Chair, Reopening Steering Committee

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Applied Communication major’s EntICING Cakes food truck provides ‘Free Lunch Fridays’ to area children in need.

As a young girl, the pink slip Lianna Fertig held tightly in her small hands guaranteed her a free lunch at school. Today, the pink truck she drives carries that same promise to kids in the inner-city neighborhood where she grew up: Free Lunch Fridays.

But Fertig offers more than sandwiches to the children at Akron’s Robinson Academy and school districts across Summit and Stark counties. “We want families to know they are thought of, that we do care about them during these uncertain times,” said the senior Applied Communication major at Kent State University at Stark. “We share laughs, we share hope for better days.”

Preparing ready-to-eat lunches from her food truck, EntICING Cakes, was a way for Fertig to help local communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.  

“Many parents have been asked to work remotely, which means new challenges, such as the extra time and cost to handle lunch that is typically offered by the schools,” she said. “So, every Friday, I drive my truck around neighborhoods in need and hand out free lunches to kids.”

She plans to continue the service this summer, a time when childhood hunger is often at its highest.

Fertig started the nonprofit, Free Lunch Fridays, with her friend, Ahlam “Lam” Abbas, CEO of the Dirty Lamb, a local company specializing in high performance skin care.  

“I interned with Lam, and we are great friends. Plus, we have some time on our hands,” explained Fertig. “Due to coronavirus, a lot of weddings and corporate events that EntICING Cakes would typically bake for have been cancelled, so it made sense to do something creative while also giving back.”

On a typical week, Fertig and Abbas make 100 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and assemble other lunch offerings, based on donations. All lunches are given away; cupcakes are offered for sale. Donations are being accepted for Free Lunch Fridays. For more information, visit www.freelunchfridays.com.

Fertig credited one of her professors, Lisa Waite, senior lecturer of Communication Studies, for inspiring her to strive for more. 

“She always tells us that we have the responsibility to do more, not less,” Fertig said.

Fertig clings to that.

“It’s super humbling to see children without shoes as they walk up to our big, pink truck and pick up lunches for all of their brothers and sisters,” she said. “You just know you’re doing something that goes beyond offering a free lunch, it’s taking care of children, of families, who may feel hopeless during this time.”

For Fertig, it’s also full circle. From walking Robinson Academy’s halls to driving her pink truck around the city block she used to call home, the hands that now reach out to her for help are so familiar to her own. Once small, held open wide and ready to receive, Fertig’s hands are now ready to give – even if just for one Free Lunch Friday – hope. 
 

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

A Message to Our New Students

The circumstances that we are all experiencing from COVID-19 have disrupted one of the most exciting and happiest times of your life – preparing for college. Through all of the stress and uncertainty, I want you to know that Kent State University at Stark is here to support you.

FLASHES TAKE CARE OF FLASHES

Kent State remains committed to providing you with an affordable, world-class education. Students and their families across the country are choosing to invest with us, and we hope you will, too.

We want to help you and your family weather the current crisis by assisting you with staying on track with your college plans. If you or your family have experienced a loss of income, have questions about applying for financial aid and scholarships, or would like to learn about payment plan options, let us help.

Our team of Financial Aid experts are ready to assist you.

Become a Debt-Free Flash

LOOKING FORWARD TO FALL 2020

Kent State University President Todd Diacon recently announced that the university prefers to resume face-to-face instruction on all Kent State campuses. In addition to our preference for face-to-face instruction, Kent State is preparing both a remote learning scenario and a hybrid face-to-face and remote learning plan.

PHASES FOR RETURNING TO CAMPUSES

Please know that your safety and well-being and that of other students and employees are of primary importance, and our plans and preparations will be guided by health experts and by following state and federal guidelines.

If you have further questions, please reach out to us at starkadmissions@kent.edu. You can find more information by visiting our Admissions page or reach out to any of our Admissions team members. We are here to support you!

Kent State University at Stark truly is the safe option during these uncertain times. You will discover why so many of our students choose to #StayHometown!

Sincerely,

Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Kent State University at Stark


 

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Staff Excellence Award

As Kent State University at Stark looks forward to the new academic year, Dean Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., announced the winners of the 2020 Staff Excellence Awards, while extending heartfelt gratitude to all campus staff.

“I want to thank you for supporting this institution and doing everything within your power to make every semester, this one especially, a successful one for our students,” said Seachrist. “Without all of you, our greater goal of educating the community doesn’t happen as effectively or efficiently.”

Staff and faculty have successfully transitioned day-to-day jobs from the office to home, embracing a temporary remote working environment spurred by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Seachrist said she is honored to announce this year’s Staff Excellence Award recipients: Darcy McBride, administrator of the year; and Mike Shipe, staff member of the year.

“It is clear Darcy and Mike demonstrate a strong commitment to our campus,” Seachrist said. “Both were described in their award nominations as reliable and dependable, the epitome of a team player.”

Of McBride, coordinator of Academic Services, Student Accessibility & Tutoring, one nominator said, “She works tirelessly to support students and be a true advocate. Darcy’s work ethic and dependability are above and beyond what anyone could ask for.”

Another said: “Darcy’s commitment to the campus and Kent State makes me want to be better at my job. The support and guidance she offers means so much. She has that open-door policy and makes you feel welcome and that you are important. …When meeting with students, Darcy greets them with a smile and encouragement. She believes and effectively communicates her belief that they can be successful at Kent State Stark, no matter their circumstances or struggles.” 

Of Shipe, the Conference Center’s custodian, one nominator said, “This facility is well cared for on days it is bustling. Mike makes sure the building shines. He understands his role and the importance of his role to set the stage for an outstanding event. He is the glue that keeps everything connected.”

Another said: “Mike takes a sincere approach to carrying out the duties of his job. It is obvious that he takes pride in his work. Mike has worked many hours past his normal work schedule in order to make sure these tasks are properly completed… He never complains and always displays a positive attitude. His positive attributes are enormously critical to the KSU community.”

This year’s Staff Excellence Selection Committee was led by 2019 Staff Excellence Award winner Ellen Reber and included: Katie Baer, Jim Seelye, Julie Spotts, Deirdre Warren and Jeanne Winafeld.


 

Thursday, May 07, 2020

Thursday, May 7, 2020

Dear students,
 
I want to check in with you and see how you are doing. There has been so much going on recently, resulting in changes that are out of your control as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
 
Finances might be a concern that are causing you to delay registering for summer and fall semesters. If you or your family have experienced a loss of income, have questions about applying for financial aid and scholarships, or would like to learn about payment plan options, please do not hesitate to reach out to a member of our Kent State Stark Financial Aid team to have your questions answered. 
 
You can now schedule an appointment online to speak to a financial aid representative or VA certifying official. You’ll have the option to select a Microsoft Teams, phone or email appointment. You can still continue to email Financial Aid at starkfinancialaid@kent.edu for any questions.
 
Now is also a great time to check in with your academic advisor before summer break. You can email Academic Advising at ksustarkadvisors@kent.edu or schedule an appointment online.
 
We care about you. Your dream of a college education does not have to be put on hold. Your Hometown University is here to help.
 
Sincerely,  
Dean Denise Seachrist


Thursday, March 19, 2020

Dear students and campus community,

As you will notice on our social media pages, we are working to share some encouraging words. Tomorrow, you’ll hear from faculty and staff members as we encourage everyone to dig deep.

I have every confidence that we are going to get through this together because, at Kent State University at Stark, we’re filled with kind and compassionate people who really do care about one another and take care of each other. We respect one another. And so, knowing that we have this community, with our best interests at heart, gives me hope.

I know that any time we face adversity in our lives, we come out stronger as a result.

I invite you to view the below short video.

 
Sincerely,
Dean Denise Seachrist 


Monday, March 16, 2020

Dear students and campus community,

As you are aware, Kent State University has taken a very proactive measure to close in order to prevent further spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) in Ohio.

This move does not change our commitment to continue the academic mission of the university. Our dedicated faculty members are continuing their swift efforts to transfer classes online. Meanwhile, our staff continues to address student needs, transitioning to offering all services online and via telephone.

Together, we are rising to meet these new, unprecedented challenges every minute, every hour, every day in the weeks to come.

SOME IMPORTANT STEPS FOR STUDENTS INCLUDE:

Technology. If you do not have a computer in which you can access your coursework at home, you may borrow a laptop from our library through 5 p.m. Tuesday. Please call 330-244-3330 to set up an appointment. The library will not be open for any purpose other than to check out laptops or books already requested and on our hold shelves. All other library services are suspended.

Financial Aid. Campus Financial Aid can be reached at starkfinancialaid@kent.edu. If you have paperwork to turn in to financial aid, you can submit it directly to the Kent State University One Stop.

Academic Advising. Schedule your advising appointment online or email ksustarkadvisors@kent.edu.

Tutoring and Testing. For tutoring and other Academic Success Center services, email dmcbri10@kent.edu (Darcy McBride, tutoring) and jcervena@kent.edu (Jessica Cervenak, testing).

Counseling. For Counseling Services, you are encouraged to call our counselors directly at 330-244-5048 (Emily Ribnik) or 330-244-3408 (Kelsey Kalgreen) or email starkcounseling@kent.edu.

Spring Coursework. Continue to work with your professors electronically or via telephone for further instruction regarding your academic coursework. There are several great resources available at www.kent.edu/keeponlearning.

FOR FACULTY AND STAFF:

Campus Closure. At 5 p.m. on Monday, March 16, the campus is closed. All employees should begin working remotely Tuesday, March 17. Special arrangements will be made for faculty and staff who need building access on Tuesday. Contact Stark Campus Security at 330-244-3333 for assistance.

Resources. There are several resources available to you at www.kent.edu/keeponworking. Please be in contact via email or telephone call with your direct supervisor to discuss your next steps.

Please continue to keep each other in your thoughts during this time as we all work together, not only as a university, but as a country, to stay healthy and safe. Remember that Flashes take care of Flashes, and we will rise above these momentary challenges triumphantly.

Sincerely,

Dean Denise Seachrist

VIEW KENT STATE COVID-19 (CORONAVIRUS DISEASE) UPDATES


Friday, March 13, 2020

Dear Kent State Stark students, 

As you are aware by now, Kent State University and many other colleges and universities throughout Ohio have made the decision to suspend in-person classes and move to a remote instruction delivery model through the remainder of the semester. This move is in response to Gov. Mike DeWine’s call to public institutions of higher education to help stop the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19).

Our faculty and staff are working hard to ensure you are able to continue your academic coursework as we move to a modified teaching system. While those of you with online or hybrid classes won’t be impacted, we know this may be a big change for some of you. Our goal is for minimal interruptions in your learning and this will not have an impact on our students who are nearing graduation.

There are several great resources available at www.kent.edu/keeponlearning. Stark Campus staff can also address questions or concerns. You should have already received information concerning advising, financial aid, and other campus resources and how to access them remotely.

If you want to learn more about the university’s efforts regarding this current situation, I encourage you to bookmark www.kent.edu/advisory for updates. Information will also be shared regularly on the Stark Campus social media platforms and on our website, www.kent.edu/stark, as well as Kent State’s coronavirus information page at www.kent.edu/coronavirus.

I want to thank you for being Flashes who take care of Flashes.

Sincerely,

Dean Denise Seachrist
 

VIEW KENT STATE COVID-19 (CORONAVIRUS DISEASE) UPDATES

Friday, April 24, 2020

Even as a preschooler, Marissa Stelluto knew she wanted to be a nurse.

When her teddy bears got the sniffles, and her Barbies suffered the occasional broken leg, Stelluto was there to fix them. Toy stethoscope in hand, she listened for abnormal rhythms or other signs of something more serious.

Her brother and sister played along, and she learned early that not every superhero wears a cape.

But they do wear a mask.

These days, the 25-year-old has traded in her plastic stethoscope for one made from stainless steel. Scrubs are her uniform; gloves serve as a shield. Stelluto and her fellow nurses are ready to battle an invisible threat, a silent invader that steals the health of its victims they rally to save.

Stelluto is one of 21 Kent State University at Stark nursing students entering the field early to serve on the front lines of the COVID-19 health crisis. Slated to graduate in May, they are being recruited to assist short-handed area hospital and health care facilities.

State boards are on hold – for now. That was the Ohio Board of Nursing’s response to Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine’s declaration that Ohio is in a state of emergency due to the coronavirus pandemic. Temporary licenses are being issued to graduates, like Stelluto.

“A lot of people might be worried because we are working before passing our state boards,” said Stelluto, who will graduate with her Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). “But what they must realize is that we’ve developed the critical skills needed through our education. A state examination is simply that – an exam. It doesn’t teach you anything further.

“The program at Kent State Stark is such a great nursing program because you graduate with the skills that you need to begin working on Day One.”

For Stelluto, Day One has already begun. She’s serves as a patient care tech at Aultman Hospital in Canton, where she works directly with nurses to get patients’ vital signs, help them with bathing and feeding, along with assisting when it’s time to discharge a patient.

For all seniors in Kent State Stark’s nursing program, their final semesters are spent in clinical settings, including Aultman, Mercy Medical Center, Heartland Behavioral Health and Akron Children’s Hospital, where they receive hands-on experience to prepare them for their professional careers.

While the students are not fully licensed professionals and are limited in the services that they can perform and provide, they are a huge asset to health care facilities and illness-stricken community members, said Chrissy Kauth, Ph.D., RN, coordinator of Kent State Stark’s nursing program and the campus office of Recruitment and Retention.

“We need more people in health care to help with patients,” said Kauth. “In this pandemic, I’m sure you’ve noticed who the essential people are, they are the people protecting and providing care. We, at Kent State University, prepare the finest nurses to be on the forefront. We have the most phenomenal full-time faculty, all specialists in the area in which they teach. We are blessed to have some of the most amazing equipment, including high-fidelity simulator manikins that enable students to practice critical skills.

“We are so very proud of our senior nurses for all of their hard work and dedication that they’ve shown during this transitional time.”
Stelluto says she is ready. In fact, she’s been waiting her entire life for this moment.

“I’ve always known that I’ve wanted to take care of people,” she said. “Entering the health care profession right now, during an outbreak that occurs once in a century, doesn’t change my desire to work in the field. I go into work every day not knowing what patients could have, so I’m used to taking those kinds of precautions.

“I’m willing to take the risk, after all, that’s the job.”

It’s the one she’s dreamed about since she was a little girl. And while today’s enemy is unlike any that new nurses have ever faced, the care they’ll provide remains unchanged. They suit up: scrubs on, gloves tight, mask in place, to fight another day.

“That’s why we do this,” said Stelluto, “to save lives.”


Learn more about Kent State Stark's nursing program

Kent State University at Stark’s nursing program is part of Ohio’s largest academic program for nursing – the sixth largest program in the nation – educating the majority of Northeast Ohio’s registered nurses. It offers students a comprehensive curriculum, leading edge simulation technology, and valuable clinical experiences with more than 350 clinical partners.

Graduates are in high demand, with most having jobs upon graduation. In fact, more than 40% of the nursing workforce in Northeast Ohio are Kent State College of Nursing graduates. The university’s wide range of nursing programs meet the career goals of students and the growing demand for professionally trained nurses.

Find out more at www.kent.edu/stark/nursing.


Photo caption: Graduating senior, Marissa Stelluto, provides care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Thursday, April 23, 2020

Imagine being in high school and having no plan for your future…

Imagine being told that college is not an option for you because of finances…

Imagine no one in your family ever attending college and being discouraged at the thought…

Then, imagine hearing that Kent State University at Stark’s Rising Scholars Program could change your life.

Rising Scholars is designed to give first-generation and underrepresented students a pathway to achieve a college degree at no cost to participants. Our goal is for every student in our program to complete postsecondary education with the credentials necessary to succeed in his or her career.

Students who successfully complete the high school portion of the program will be eligible to apply for a full-tuition Rising Scholars Scholarship at Kent State Stark and change their lives forever.

The Rising Scholars program includes year-round enrichment workshops on a variety of subjects including STEM, personal leadership, academic motivation, college readiness, career exploration and civic engagement. The program also features the Summer Institute during which students have the opportunity to gain unique learning and service experiences.

A global pandemic was the last thing that Lester Sanders, Rising Scholars Program coordinator at Kent State Stark, was expecting in 2020. This program originated with Canton McKinley and has grown to include GlenOak, Canton South, Fairless, and Alliance this year.

“We are determined to keep the program going during this crisis and also want it to thrive because this is a vital ‘Real-Life Learning Opportunity’ to mentor students on how to navigate adversity in everyday life,” Sanders said. “From this pedagogical perspective, they will gain experience in overcoming adversities that are awaiting them in the future. Life is 10 percent about what happens to us and 90 percent about how we respond, and the Rising Scholars Program wants to model that in real-time.”

During the COVID-19 pandemic and period of social distancing, Sanders is making daily adjustments about how to best connect with the students utilizing remote communication technology, such as Google Meet and Zoom. The mandatory 2020 Summer Institute will be taught virtually.

Kaylee Allison is a member of the first graduating cohort of the Rising Scholars Program from Canton McKinley High School and has plans to become a nurse. “I know I can earn a college degree especially from the instruction and skills I gained from the Rising Scholars Program, my concern was paying for college. This program has taken that concern away, which will allow me to concentrate more on my goal of graduation,” said Allison. “I am grateful for this opportunity at Kent State Stark.”

The Rising Scholars Program at Kent State Stark was initially made possible through a generous donation from The Hoover Foundation. “If you truly want to make a difference in the life of a young person, the Rising Scholars Program is where it can happen,” said Beth Fuciu, associate director of advancement at Kent State Stark. “To offer these students a free college education is like offering them the world. The program is a true commitment to bettering Stark County through the education of our youth.

“There is uncertainty in the world today, but we know for certain that the Rising Scholars Program will rise above and continue to offer hope to promising young minds.”

If you are interested in making a gift to support Rising Scholars at Kent State Stark, please contact: Beth Fuciu, Associate Director of Advancement (bfuciu@kent.edu or 330-705-1122).

 
Image caption: Rising Scholars Program Coordinator Lester Sanders meets with Rising Scholars student, Kaylee Allison, remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

A woman wearing a face mask and gloves nervously enters Aladdin’s Eatery at The Strip in Belden Village to pick up her food. Clearly anxious, she expresses concern about touching anything to sign her receipt. She proceeds to wait outside of the restaurant for her server-turned-carryout hostess to deliver her order.

A Target customer attempts to check out with nearly 10 gallons of milk. He becomes irate and leaves the store without purchasing anything after the cashier gently reminds him that there is a limit of two gallons per customer.

This is a new reality for Kent State University at Stark’s working students – now essential employees – with jobs in food service, retail and more during the current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Dylon McElhaney is a senior English major working as a delivery driver for the Marco’s Pizza in Girard. “There’s a much larger emphasis on safety for both ourselves and the customers,” said the 2015 Howland High School graduate. “Every step of the process is sanitized to reduce that chance.”

John Gerber, a freshman in his second semester at Kent State Stark, works as a cashier at the Target in Jackson Township. Gerber acknowledges that he is a self-proclaimed “germaphobe” and has been more cautious than ever – even sanitizing the card reader and conveyor belt after every customer.

McElhaney explained that although some customers have been ignorant of the rules and precautions, most have been supportive and understanding.

“I’ve noticed a lot of kinder people, or, at least people show their kindness a bit more, whether that’s giving extra tips or just offering more conversation,” he said. “I’ve had a lot of people really sympathize with me delivering, even though I’m not doing anything that dangerous in comparison to the health care field.”

Hope Hutchings, a sophomore at Kent State Stark working as a carryout hostess at Aladdin’s, echoed McElhaney’s sentiment, saying that most customers have been considerate. “They know it’s not in our control. It’s not our fault,” she said.

Normalcy is certainly missed. “I do miss serving people,” added Hutchings, a communication studies major. “When you get a good table, or even a bad table, you have a connection with people. I miss the people who love coming out to eat.”

In addition to working, going to college – especially now that classes are delivered remotely –proves to be a learned balancing act. Hutchings, a 2018 Hoover High School graduate, said she is working hard to keep the same routine she had while taking in-person classes. Namely, she completes her coursework during the day and works in the evenings.

McElhaney said that while the semester has been challenging, he has experienced incredible support from the English faculty.

“Honestly, the (remote) courses, they’ve been really great, and I feel like all of my teachers have been extremely helpful during this time,” he said. “I really can’t thank enough my teachers because they’ve really went above and beyond this semester for me.”

Still, students long for days back on campus. “I miss walking with friends from one class to another, one building to another,” said Gerber, a 2019 Jackson High School graduate.

“I do miss conversations with other communication students – the interpersonal connection with other people,” said Hutchings. She’s keeping up in her “Criticism of Public Discourse” class by reading her textbook, but says of professor Lisa Waite, senior lecturer of communication studies, “I need her wisdom, her anecdotes!”

Until in-person classes resume, Kent State Stark students continue to find the silver lining.

“We are living through history,” explained Gerber. “It’s kind of exciting. I can say I was alive during the coronavirus pandemic. Every generation has their defining crisis. Millennials had 9/11. Generation Z has the coronavirus.” Said like a true political science/journalism major.

“This is obviously a very difficult situation, but I think we’re gonna get through this, and I think we will be better for it,” added McElhaney. “Not that this is a good thing, but I think that because of all this, maybe we will spend more time building up our health care system and appreciating our workers more.

“I just hope that there are some positives that come from this situation, but I know that as long as we stick together, we can get through this.”

Friday, April 17, 2020

Dear Stark County high school seniors,

This is not how you wanted your senior year to end.

You deserved last dances at the prom, championship tournaments and walking with your class to the timeless sound of “Pomp and Circumstance”. But as our circumstances would have it, those celebratory marches, game-winning shots and slow songs aren’t to be.

Still, we at Kent State University at Stark cheer you on because you are a resilient bunch. You were just babies on 9/11, just little kids when the Great Recession had an impact on many families, and now, you are making big sacrifices for the safety of others during a global health crisis.

One day, we’ll look back on this moment as a pivotal one – when your generation sacrificed much for the greater good.

When I was a senior in high school, I looked forward to the little things, like my school’s senior breakfast that took place annually the Friday before graduation. We celebrated with alumni, family and friends during what would be our last time in the school before we received our diplomas. It was a beautiful send-off.

I know this is not the senior year you’d imagined; these are not the moments that make you feel like your time in high school is coming to a close. Still, every day, I am inspired by the new and creative ways that you are celebrating life’s big moments using Zoom, FaceTime and even old-fashioned telephone calls. And while you may be missing the milestones that define a senior year, no circumstance can take away the undeniable achievements that make you so special.

I love my role in the College Credit Plus program because I get to witness our students as they grow and challenge themselves. Thank you for participating in CCP at Kent State Stark and making it an important part of your high school experience.

As Your Hometown University, Kent State University at Stark wants you to know that we are thinking of you! We are celebrating you, and we are here to help.

We would love to see you continue with us in the fall. You might want to start one of our major programs, such as Nursing, Middle Childhood Education, Business Management, Music Technology or Computer Science, that can be completed entirely at Kent State Stark. Or maybe, you’d just like to stay close to home for your freshman year of college.

During these uncertain times, you can find certainty in knowing that you have a world-class, affordable public university in your backyard, close to the safety of home with local professors who care. Right now, we are waiving application fees, along with ACT/SAT requirements for fall 2020 admission. Apply today at www.kent.edu/stark/apply-now. Make sure to click “Apply as a New Freshman” to qualify for freshman scholarships.

We are Kent State Stark Strong, and we are here for all of you!

We believe in a brighter future, together!


Elizabeth Ohlin, M.Ed.
Academic Program Coordinator, College Credit Plus
Kent State University at Stark
 

Thursday, April 09, 2020

Kent State University at Stark’s Corporate University is offering complimentary check-in surveys to area businesses to assess their employees’ needs during the coronavirus pandemic.

“Just as we continue to provide academic services to our students during this unprecedented time, we are providing this service as a help to our local business community,” said Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., Kent State Stark’s dean and chief administrative officer. “Our Corporate University is providing this check-in survey to assist business leaders in keeping the pulse of their employees, many of whom are working remotely.”

The Corporate University will work with businesses to design a free, custom employee check-in survey, which can provide valuable feedback about staff needs – ranging from technology to emotional support.

“Maintaining contact and communication with your team is critical during times of stress and uncertainty,” said Marshall Hill, Corporate University outreach program coordinator and survey author. “As the community outreach arm of the campus, we are happy to support our business community in this small, but impactful way.”

To inquire about this complimentary service, please contact Hill at mhill6@kent.edu.

Friday, April 03, 2020

Unprecedented challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic necessitate a change in approach to Kent State University’s admissions process to ensure student access and success.

“We recognize that COVID-19 has disrupted the college enrollment process for our prospective students and K-12 educational partners,” said Sean Broghammer, Ph.D., associate vice president for enrollment management/admissions at Kent State. “Therefore, we have worked to simplify our admissions process beginning with the 2020 Fall Semester.”

For fall 2020 applicants, Kent State University at Stark will:

  • Waive ACT/SAT standardized test requirements, recognizing that testing was canceled in many locations leaving students unable to take the test.
  • Accept unofficial transcripts from high school counselors.
  • Waive application fees.
  • Move the deadline to apply for the 2020 Fall Semester to Aug. 15.

“Kent State is always committed to promoting access to higher education, and the need to do so is particularly crucial in these times of unprecedented challenges,” said Melody Tankersley, Ph.D., Kent State’s interim senior vice president and provost.

Kent State Stark faculty and administration agree the changes are in the best interest of students.

“Student success is paramount to our mission at Kent State University at Stark,” said Lisa Hart, Ph.D., director of Stark Campus enrollment management and student services. “As Stark County’s only public university, we are open to everyone, and we have the academic services in place to support student success. Just as we have been committed to academic excellence, since our founding nearly 75 years ago, we remain steadfast to that commitment during today’s uncertain times.”

For Stark Campus Admissions, visit Kent State Stark Admissions or email starkadmissions@kent.edu.

# # #

Stark Campus Media Contact:
Melissa Seeton, mseeton@kent.edu, 330-244-3262

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Kent State University announced the creation of the Pay It Flash Forward Emergency Fund that will help students who are unexpectedly finding themselves in financial need as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Our students need us now more than ever,” said Kent State President Todd Diacon. “I am confident that our Golden Flash family will answer that call, because despite the uncertainty we are all facing at this time, there is one thing that remains constant: Flashes take care of Flashes.”

More than $15,800 was raised within 24 hours of the fund’s launch via the president’s March 26 email to all university alumni.

With the recent shift to remote learning for the remainder of the semester and other challenges related to the COVID-19 pandemic, some students and their families are encountering unexpected financial challenges associated with travel, food, housing, technology needs and, in some cases, lost wages by both the student and parents.

”These funds will help students who need it most and will keep them on track to their ultimate goal: graduation,” said Steve Sokany, Kent State vice president for institutional advancement and executive director of the Kent State University Foundation. “Perhaps most importantly, it’s a reminder to our students that we are here for them. They are a part of our Kent State family, and we are in this together.”

In order to distribute funds quickly and efficiently, Kent State is streamlining the application process. Undergraduate and graduate students who are experiencing a financial need and who are attending any of the university’s eight campuses may apply.

Students - Apply for the Pay It Flash Forward Emergency Grant

Those interested in supporting this fund can visit the Pay It Flash Forward Emergency Fund page.

# # #

Media Contacts:
Eric Mansfield, emansfie@kent.edu, 330-672-2797
Leigh Greenfelder, lgreenfe@kent.edu, 330-672-7108

Stark Media Contacts:
Melissa Seeton, mseeton@kent.edu, 330-244-3262
Beth Fuciu, bfuciu@kent.edu, 330-244-3225

Stark Campus Operations Updates
Stark Campus Operations Updates
Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Updated Jan. 3, 2022:

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY'S SPRING SEMESTER PLANS

During the 2022 Spring Semester, most aspects of university life to be very close to pre-pandemic normal, with a return of all in-person classes, engaging activities and residence halls that are at capacity. 

Face coverings will continue to be required inside all buildings, and are strongly recommended outdoors where six feet of social distancing cannot be maintained.

Because of the ever-changing nature of the pandemic, our plans are always subject to change to adapt to new pandemic conditions that might arise, including the rise of the COVID-19 omicron variant.

For the health and safety of our entire university community, on Aug. 27, 2021, Kent State implemented a COVID-19 vaccine requirement which now extends to all students, faculty and staff. While booster shots are not yet part of this requirement, they are strongly encouraged.

All our decisions will continue to be guided by the best public health science and recommendations from federal, state and local health agencies, as they have since the beginning of the pandemic.

KENT STATE COVID-19 UPDATES   COVID-19 DASHBOARD   COVID-19 REQUIREMENTS & GUIDELINES


STARK CAMPUS SPRING 2022 OPERATIONS

  • Face coverings will continue to be required inside all buildings, and are strongly recommended outdoors where six feet of social distancing cannot be maintained.
  • Kent State Stark community members and visitors should follow Flashes Safe Eight to ensure the safety of our community.
  • Open office hours are posted on each office's website. See below.

STARK CAMPUS COVID-19 PROTOCOLS

 
CLEANING & DISINFECTING

Campus areas will be cleaned and disinfected daily. Cleaning and disinfecting stations are located throughout campus. Please do not move cleaning supplies from room to room. Plexiglass barriers have been installed in high traffic offices and areas.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU FEEL YOU HAVE COVID-19 SYMPTOMS

If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing), get emergency medical care immediately and/or call 911 and:

COVID-19 SELF-TEST KITS

Self-test kits are available for free to any member of the Kent State community and can be picked up at the Kent State Stark Library. View website for hours.

COVID-19 VACCINE EXEMPTION

On Aug. 27, 2021, Kent State issued a COVID-19 vaccine requirement effective Dec. 20, 2021. Exemptions to this requirement will be granted for medical, religious or personal conscience reasons. Anyone seeking an exemption must submit the appropriate request form (see below) and accompanying documentation. Submitting the request form and appropriate documentation does not grant you an automatic exemption. Exemption requests will be individually reviewed for completion, accuracy of information and direct relevance to the COVID-19 vaccination requirement. Please do not assume that because you have requested an exemption that it is or will be approved. Submitting your request starts the review process. You will be notified, in writing, whether your request is approved or denied. Denials cannot be appealed, but you may submit a new exemption request if additional supporting documentation becomes available. The review process is expected to take up to four weeks, after the submission of the appropriate request form and documentation.

COVID-19 VACCINE EXEMPTION


STARK CAMPUS ASSISTANCE 

  • Email starkinfo@kent.edu or call 330-499-9600. Emails and messages will be returned by the next business day.
  • Campus Security can be reached at 330-244-3333. Save this number as a favorite in your phone.

ACADEMIC ADVISING

ACADEMIC SUCCESS CENTER

ADMISSIONS

BOOKSTORE

CAMPUS TOURS

COLLEGE CREDIT PLUS

COMPUTER LABS

CONFERENCE CENTER

CORPORATE UNIVERSITY

COUNSELING SERVICES

  • www.kent.edu/stark/counseling-services
  • Faculty and staff may contact Kent State University’s Employee Assistance Program, IMPACT, at 1-800-227-6007, for live, immediate assistance.
  • There are several 24/7 professional support services available that can also connect you to local resources. You can reach the Crisis Text Hotline by texting 741-741. You can reach the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline by calling 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or by visiting their website for a live chat.

EVENTS

FINANCIAL AID

     VETERANS BENEFITS & MILITARY CALL-UP GUIDELINES

FIRST STEP - FIRST-YEAR ADVISING & REGISTRATION

FLASH BISTRO

FLASHCARD STUDENT ID

  • www.kent.edu/stark/flashcard
  • New Stark Campus students can request a FLASHcard online; follow instructions on website
  • Students can also visit Student Services, 132 Main Hall, for a FLASHcard

FLASH'S FOOD PANTRY

GLOBAL EDUCATION INITIATIVES

INTERNSHIP & CAREER SERVICES

LIBRARY

PARKING SERVICES

RECREATION & WELLNESS CENTER

SENIOR GUESTS

SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

STUDENT ACCESSIBILITY SERVICES

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT & ORGANIZATIONS

STUDENT SERVICES OFFICE

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

TESTING SERVICES

TUTORING SERVICES

WRITING CENTER


CONTINUE TO TAKE PREVENTATIVE MEASURES

FLASHES COVID-19 PREVENTION INFORMATION
It is imperative that we take steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Additional information can be found here:

We take all of these steps to ensure the health and safety of our campus community and to be proactive in an effort to prevent illness while continuing the academic mission of the university.

We will continue to monitor the outbreak and will align our recommendations with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the World Health Organization and other city, state and federal agencies.

SUBSCRIBE TO FLASHALERTS

 

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

Several telecommunications companies are offering free internet access to students and area families.

MCTV, a leading internet, TV and phone provider in the region, announced Tuesday it would offer free internet access for families without service in response to online learning concerns related to COVID-19.

MCTV is offering free internet access to households with K-12 or college students who do not already have an MCTV broadband subscription. The offer is available now through April 30. Find additional information here or call 330-833-4134.

Comcast and Spectrum are also offering free internet access to households that do not already have a subscription.

Comcast is offering its Internet Essentials package for free for 60 days during the coronavirus outbreak. Find additional information at Free Internet Essentials package.

Spectrum is offering broadband and WiFi access for 60 days to households. Get more information on Free Spectrum Internet.

Thanks to the “Keep Americans Connected Pledge”, AT&T, Comcast, Charter, Cox, Google Fiber, Spring, Verizon, and T-Mobile will not disconnect customers over the next 60 days. Read the Pledge.

You can find more information regarding remote instruction resources and remote working resources at the following:

Friday, March 06, 2020

Kent State University at Stark Theatre will hold its second theatrical production of the 2019-20 season, “The Nerd”, a two-act comedy by playwright Larry Shue.

The cast of “The Nerd” will take to the campus’ stage for opening night at 7:30 p.m. March 6 in The Mary J. Timken Theatre, which is located in the expanded and renovated Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW.

Directed by Kent State Stark Theatre Director Jim Weaver, “The Nerd” is set in Terre Haute, Indiana, in late 1979. The play centers around the hilarious dilemma of a young architect, Willum Cubbert, who is visited by Rick Steadman, a fellow ex-GI whom he has never met but saved his life after he was seriously wounded in Vietnam. Willum is delighted when the ex-GI shows up unexpectedly at his apartment on the night of his 34th birthday party. However, Rick’s awkward manner and inappropriate behavior throw the occasion, and Willum’s life, into shambles.

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. March 6 and 7, and at 2 p.m. March 8. The show also will take place at 7:30 p.m. March 13 and 14, and at 2 p.m. March 15.

Tickets for the show can be purchased online at www.kent.edu/stark/the-nerd, by phone at 330-244-3348 or in person at the box office in the Fine Arts lobby. Will call opens one hour prior to performances. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for senior citizens and non-KSU students. Tickets are free to all Kent State students with student IDs.
 

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Renowned marine scientist Michael W. Beck, Ph.D., will discuss the importance of coastal conservation at a free lecture on March 4.

Beck, a research professor in the Institute of Marine Sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz, focuses on conserving our coastlines in an effort to reduce the risks of storm surges and flooding to property, people and our planet.

Thanks to a generous grant from the Herbert W. Hoover Foundation, Beck will speak at 7 p.m. March 4 in Auditorium 101 in the Science & Nursing Building at Kent State University at Stark, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. The event is open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

Beck’s approach to research is multidisciplinary – across ecology, engineering and economics – in an effort to bring clear results to decision makers. A fellow of both the Fulbright Scholar Program and the Pew Marine Conservation Program, Beck worked for 20 years at The Nature Conservancy helping to establish a global marine program before being named lead marine scientist.

“Even though Stark County is a long way from the ocean, it’s important that we generate an interest in ocean biodiversity, especially as threats to that biodiversity continue to increase,” said Greg Smith, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences at Kent State Stark. “There is great value in the preservation of our natural ecosystems that buffer our coastlines from damaging storms, for example. Understanding what we are losing is crucial to creating sustainable solutions for the future.”

As part of the grant from the H.W. Hoover Foundation, Kent State Stark students will travel to Florida this summer to study the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf Coast and the Everglades ecosystems, along with Smith and Robert Hamilton IV, Ph.D., associate professor of biological sciences. The grant will also support Beck’s continuing research.

“We are thankful to the H.W. Hoover Foundation for providing the means for our regional campus to collaborate with top-tier researchers,” Smith said. “It provides our students and our community with an incredible opportunity to understand the critical need of preserving our endangered marine ecosystems.”
 

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Update on March 10 at 4 p.m.

Our Featured Speaker event is STILL TAKING PLACE tonight at 7:30 p.m. in the Kent State Stark Conference Center. However, beginning tomorrow, Kent State University has canceled face-to-face classes and events through April 12, 2020. This move aligns with Ohio Governor Mike DeWine's proactive approach to limit the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19). There have been no confirmed cases in Stark County or on any of the Kent State University campuses.


Singer-songwriter, philanthropist and actor, Bryan Terrell Clark is perhaps best known for his starring role as George Washington in the record-breaking hit “Hamilton: An American Musical” on Broadway. His TV credits include “Empire”, “CSI: NY” and “Blue Bloods”, and musically, he has performed with stars Brandy, Ciara and Michael Bublé. 

Clark is the final presenter in this year’s Featured Speakers Series lineup. He will speak at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 10. 

Now in its 29th year, the Featured Speakers Series is free and open to the public, but tickets are required and limited to two per person. 

Tickets for Clark’s presentation are available beginning at 7:30 a.m. Monday, Feb. 17, at the Main Hall information desk. Tickets will remain available, while supplies last, during regular business hours 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. 

GET TICKETS
Clark made his Broadway debut playing the iconic role of Marvin Gaye in “Motown: The Musical”, which received a 2014 Grammy Award nomination for Best Musical Theater Album. 

Clark is the co-founder of the philanthropic lifestyle brand inDEFINED, launched in 2017 to inspire and teach young people to use their voices to dispel constrictive labels in society. The online apparel brand supports arts education programs for at-risk youth.

Featured Speaker programs are held in Timken Great Hall at the Kent State University at Stark Conference Center. Doors open at 6:45 p.m.

For more information, visit www.kent.edu/stark/featured-speakers-series.

Thursday, February 06, 2020

Kent State University at Stark’s observance of Black History Month will include such notables as actor Bryan Terrell Clark, star of the Broadway hit “Hamilton: An American Musical”, and Cleveland-based popular electric blues ensemble, the Wallace Coleman Band.

The celebratory activities, funded in part by ArtsInStark, are free, open to the public, and feature Wallace Coleman, a 10-year veteran of the Grammy Award-winning Robert Lockwood Jr. Band. Coleman will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. Feb. 20 in the auditorium at Main Hall, located on the campus at 6000 Frank Ave. NW. No tickets are required.

Coleman started his own band in 1996 and has released critically acclaimed singles on his label, including “Blues In The Wind” and “Remembering Robert Jr. Lockwood”.

A Broadway star, Clark will serve as the final presenter in this year’s Featured Speakers Series lineup. He’ll speak at 7:30 p.m. March 10 at the campus’ Conference Center.

Clark is a singer-songwriter, philanthropist and actor who made his Broadway debut playing the iconic role of Marvin Gaye in “Motown: The Musical”. He is the co-founder of the philanthropic lifestyle brand inDEFINED, which supports arts education programs for at-risk youth.

Now in its 29th year, the Featured Speakers Series is free and open to the public, but tickets are required and limited to two per person.

Tickets for Clark’s presentation will be available beginning Feb. 17 at the Main Hall information desk and will remain available during regular business hours 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday.

Join Kent State Stark for Clark, the Wallace Coleman Band, and other events listed below:


PRESENTATION: THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE
Feb. 12
12:30 to 1:30 p.m.
316 Main Hall
Presented by Leslie Heaphy, Ph.D., associate professor of history.

“THE BLACK LIST” FILM PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION
Feb. 18
12:30 to 1:45 p.m.
221 Main Hall
Discussion led by Joel Carbonell, Ph.D., associate professor of political science, and Jessica Jones, lecturer of English.

PRESENTATION: BLACK COMPOSERS
Feb. 25
3:30 to 5 p.m.
216 Fine Arts
Presented by M.J. Albacete, lecturer of architecture and environmental design.

LIVE JAZZ
Feb. 27
12:30 to 1:30 p.m.
Campus Center
Performance by Erin Vaughn, lecturer of music, and students.

View all diversity events at Kent State Stark.

 

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Kent State University at Stark is host to the 66th Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Exhibit and Awards Ceremony.

The exhibition features more than 400 pieces of artwork from middle and high school students, representing districts in Stark, Summit, Portage, Wayne, Tuscarawas and Medina counties.

66th Scholastic Art Exhibition
January 21 - 29, 2020
Fine Arts Building

Kent State University at Stark
Monday - Thursday: 7 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Friday: 7 a.m. - 5 p.m.

A regional awards ceremony for students and their families will take place on Saturday, Jan. 25, in the Kent State Stark Conference Center. 

“Kent State University at Stark is proud to again host this incredible event,” said Jack McWhorter, Ph.D., professor of art and regional affiliate coordinator of the Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Exhibit and Awards Ceremony. “The best way to characterize this competition is it truly sets the standard for work at the middle school and high school levels.”

The Stark Campus is one of 90 regional partners that sponsor the local awards program. Middle and high school art and photography students will receive Silver and Gold Key awards for their efforts. Several special awards, including the American Vision awards, also will be presented.

The artwork of Gold Key winners, American Vision and portfolio recipients will be forwarded to the national level in New York City. Winners will be announced at the National Student Art Exhibition of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards in June. Students will be notified if their work has been selected.

The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards are the largest, longest-running and most prestigious recognition program for creative young people in the United States.

Learn more about the Scholastic Art Awards & Exhibition at Kent State Stark.

Friday, January 17, 2020

The upcoming 50th May 4 commemoration in 2020 provides an opportunity for all to remember and honor the tragic events of May 4, 1970, that occurred on the Kent State University campus.

This year’s anniversary represents a significant and historic milestone, not only for the university, but for Stark County.

This semester, Kent State University at Stark will commemorate this important event in American history with a look at the events leading up to May 4, 1970 – and beyond. Here’s a look at the free, public events to be held at Kent State Stark, 6000 Frank Ave. NW:

Jackson State, Kent State, and the Civil Rights Movement
Wednesday, Jan. 22
7 to 8:30 p.m.
Science and Nursing Building – Room 101

This program discusses how the shootings at Kent State University on May 4, 1970, and Jackson State College in Mississippi, where students from both institutions were shot and killed, fit within the larger societal issues of race and violence against protestors at that time. This event also explores the establishment of Black United Students at Kent State University and their ongoing legacy of activism. This event will include a viewing of part of “Fire in the Heartland” and an open panel presentation and discussion about these connections. Presented by Dr. Robert Hamilton, IV; Dr. Amoaba Gooden; Dr. Leslie Heaphy; Professor Idris Syed; and Dr. Chris Post.

 
Placing May 4, 1970, in Historical Context

Wednesday, Feb. 19
7 to 8:30 p.m.
Main Hall – Auditorium

This Stark Campus presentation will detail the events leading up to and surrounding May 4, 1970, as well as reactions and responses. Time will also be spent talking about its importance and relevancy today. Presented by Dr. Leslie Heaphy, associate professor of history.

 
Theatre Auditions for “May 4th Voices”

Tuesday, Feb. 25, and Wednesday, Feb. 26
6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Fine Arts Building – Studio Theatre

The Kent State University at Stark Theatre will hold open auditions for “May 4th Voices: Kent State, 1970” by David Hassler. Auditions are open to everyone, including students and members of the community. Kent State Stark encourages diversity in casting. Those auditioning may perform a prepared monologue, or work from selected scene excerpts (sides) chosen by the director at the auditions. Visit www.kent.edu/stark/may-4th-voices for more information.

 
How We Remember May 4, 1970 - EVENT CANCELED

Wednesday, March 11
7 to 8:30 p.m.
Science and Nursing Building – Room 101

This Stark Campus presentation, “How We Remember May 4th: A Geographic Approach to Looking Back and Moving Forward,” will assess the commemorative history regarding the events surrounding May 4, 1970, at Kent State University, from a geographic perspective. Dr. Chris Post, a cultural and historical geographer, will present on geographic thought and analysis, which includes seeking an understanding of memorial landscapes and how they came to be, particularly by assessing where they are located, who controls their production and when/how they are produced. Presented by Dr. Chris Post, associate professor of geography.

 
“May 4th Voices: Kent State, 1970”

Fridays and Saturdays, April 17-18; April 24-25
7:30 p.m.
Sundays, April 19 and 26
2 p.m.
Fine Arts Building – The Mary J. Timken Theatre

“May 4th Voices: Kent State, 1970” by David Hassler brings together first-person narratives about the May 4, 1970, shootings at Kent State University. First performed in 2010 in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the shootings, the “May 4th Voices” play is composed of verbatim excerpts from the Kent State Shootings Oral History Project. Weaving these voices and stories together, Hassler’s play tells the human story of May 4, 1970, and its aftermath while capturing the tragedy, which had a profound impact on the nation and is credited as a catalyst in changing Americans’ view toward U.S. involvement in Vietnam. Tickets available April 6. Visit www.kent.edu/stark/may-4th-voices.

 
May 4 Civic Commons Panel

Thursday, April 23, 2020
7 - 9 p.m.
101 Science & Nursing

This panel discussion of May 4, 1970, at Kent State will feature those who were present. The panel will discuss the protests, shootings, their causes and impacts on society, including the 50 year commemorative history of May 4. Tickets not required.

 
13th Annual Student Conference

Friday, April 24, 2020
8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Science & Nursing

Each year, the Kent State Stark Honors Program sponsors the Student Conference to showcase the academic talents of Kent State students. This year, there will be a line of sessions dedicated to May 4, 1970, and its causes and impacts on society.


For more information on Kent State University systemwide events, visit www.kent.edu/may4kentstate50.
For more information on Kent State Stark events, visit www.kent.edu/stark/may4-50th-commemoration.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Fall 2019 President's & Dean's Lists

The following students have been named to the Kent State Stark Dean’s List. Those students designated with a star (*) have been named to the Kent State University President’s List.

Requirements for the Dean’s List include a 3.40 grade point average or above for the fall 2019 semester and at least 12 letter-graded (A, B, etc.) credit hours completed by the end of the semester. President’s List criteria are a 4.00 grade point and at least 15 letter-graded credit hours completed by the end of the semester. 

Akron: Brianna Allen, Andrew Bordenkircher, Jordan Burns, Lea Ciavarella, Nicole Cvammen, Chloe Dimario, Abigail Eitman*, Luke Erdle*, Elisabeth Giles, Ross Grismer, Nick Hayden, Martaysia Holland, Brianna Howiler, Tabitha Hoyt, Charisse Hubbard, Kristi Karickhoff, Kaitlyn Kitchen, Lauren Leeser, Anthony McCray, Navarre Medlock, Dominic Merlitti, Shanae Moss, Skylar Nicholson, Ashley Norris, Jason Phillips, Chelsea Pifer, Christy Rawdon, Lydia Reaman, Riley Rhoades, Renee Robinette, Amber Sapp, James Schindewolf, Alexandra Smoley, Kathy Snider-Buchanan, Alexus Snyder, Destiny Starks, Mara Thomas, Autumn Wassam, Hailey Weidlich, Carlie Whisner, Jenna Williams*, Nathan Wodzisz, Jesse Wood and Miles Woodling.

Alliance: Kailey Abel, Madison Frase, Brock Himmelheber, Shaelah Lopes, Leeann McKenna, Lynnita Moore, Jessica Morton, Tyler Mull, Trey Phillips*, Shelby Plath, Terri Pelger, Jaquiez Sampson, Allison Schloneger*, Aaron Shaffer, Jackson Simpson, Keith Smith, Brooke Stubblefield, Samuel Wright and Garrett Young.   

Amsterdam: Tatum Walulik.

Atwater: Gregory Cain, Maylee Cannon, Viktoria Kaminski, Mary Mallett, Savanah VanSteenberg and Randall Wise.

Aurora: Tyler Bulone.

Baltic: Garrett Disler.

Barberton: Bethany Markov, Brittney Merritt, Kara Morey, Luke Overmire and Katherine Seiter.

Beach City: Carissa Casto-Leglise, Caprice Swedren, Hallie Swonger and Paul Tucker.

Berlin Center: Tommy Woolf.

Bolivar: Whysper Baker, David Copen, Solomon Hill, Chase Knode and Gabrielle Tausch*.

Brewster: Hannah Asplin, Zachary Childs, Zane Fisher, Andrew Hall and Gabrielle Russo*.           

Buffalo: Arikah Cady.

Cadiz: Kristina Cologie.

Canal Fulton: Angelica Aronson*, Maya Bachtel, Sydney Boser, Kylie Collmar, Jacob Demaree, Natalie Feaser, Chelsea Hatfield, Mackenzie Hawkins, Anna Henson, Briana Horvath, Hannah Messner, Katherine Miller, Danielle Myers, Julie Ovendorf, Liam Roach, Emily Spencer, Jennifer Van Camp and Dustin Zellers.

Canton: Ali Al-Ali, Brooke Allen, Mackenzie Ash, Kate Bailey, Robert Baker, Macy Banner, Nicholas Banner, Autumn Bell, Matthew Blanton, Nathanael Blubaugh, Ashley Boggs, Jessica Bracken, Makenzea Briggs, Mara Brinker, Julia Brooks, Derek Brown, Dora Brumbaugh*, Xena Burden, Rebecca Butler, Clay Casper, Kylee Cheatwood, Emily Clemson, Rebekah Cornell, Anthony Curati, Maya Demchak, Arabella Dillard, Derek Firth, Hannah Fricker, Mercede Gutscher, Elijah Hall, Lydia Harless, Kelly Harter, Sydney Hathaway, Breanne Hawthorne, Matthew Herttna, Amma Hmeidan, Skylyn Hooks, Mason Hoopingarner, Kaitlyn Hutt, Mitch Jacovetty, Jordan Jamison, Chase Jeffries, Marquiez Jennings, Sean Jordan, Ashley Knoch, Emma Laughman, Katelynn Leach, Hannah Lemons, Eric Lieser, Erin Lockwood, Julia Lockwood, Adrianna Long*, Christian Lucas, Corneliu Lup, Landen Marchand, Daniel Maurer, Tessa Maurer, Robert McBride, Ryan McCamish, Megan McDaniel, Eilis McGee, Shaun McMyler, Victoria Medla, Kathryn Milek, Isaac Miller, Heather Monnot, Madison Moore, Brittany Myers, Olivia Nagy, Joseph Neff, Joan Oster, Mia Owens, Zach Petroff, La'Teshia Pullin, John Robison, Lauren Rooney, Steven Rudder, Kayla Saffell, Jonathan Sams, Mason Sanders, Eric Sarbaugh, Michael Savoldi, Selena Shirkey, Marcus Simon, Shannon Simonson, John Smithberger, Brittany Spangler, Brianna Sprout, Marissa Stelluto, Zachary Sterling, Alyssa Storz, Caleb Summers, Alexander Sweeney, Lauren Tarver, Alexis Taylor*, McKenzie Taylor, Phillip Thomas, Abigail Thouvenin*, Kaitlyn Unklesbay*, Louis Varlamos, Emily Vossen, Laura Wadsworth, Sharon Walsh*, Hailey Weaver*, Taylor Weaver, Sarah Weinstock*, Matthew Weller, Nathan Wells, Dylan Weygandt and Zachary Williams.

Carrollton: Lexianne De Leon, Robert Husted, Alivia Kinney* and Zara Pyles.

Cleveland: Imari Hill.

Clinton: Abigail Brandenburg, Madelyn Clair, Kayden Fricke, Timothy Haines, Abby Mizener and Madalyn Swinehart.

Copley: Jordan Ziss.

Cortland: Alex Tryon.

Coshocton: Benjamin Mikulik.

Coventry Township: Teresa Crater, Collin Knisely, Mark Moldovan, Erica Oeltjen and Joshua Tomor.

Cuyahoga Falls: Benjamin Chandler, Andrew Kuder, Eric Martinez and Carlie Myers.

Dalton: Makayla Clos and Jennifer Hinton.

Dellroy: Drew Ohman and Elizabeth Woods.

Dennison: Jillian Keen.

Dover: Jewell Lewis, Ashley Rader and Geoffery Thompson.

Doylestown: Rachel Bachman.

East Canton: Brooke Baker, Veronica Bingham, Hollie Dalton and Audrey Graytok.

East Sparta: Jaret Knox and Kyelynn Mastri.

Eastlake: Justin Cooper.

Fairlawn: Brice and Leah Miller.

Fresno: Kristin Poorman.

Garrettsville: Sharon Kernig.

Geneva: Bryan Whitten.

Hartville: Dina Beachy, Megan Behon, Hannah Coblentz, Kathryn Connair, Brandon Fisher, Joshua Hershberger*, Adam McCloskey, Mary Peach, Kenneth Slaton, Liam Spencer, Averi Starkweather, Bailey Sweitzer*, Jaime Tobin, Corey Velasquez and Olivia Yoder.

Hubbard: David Wise.

Kensington: Cameron Haught.

Kent: Isabelle Cullen and Patrick Glaser.       

Lakemore: George Hayden.  

Lisbon: Gavin McCloskey and Karlee Pezzano.

Louisville: Julianne Agnone*, Kory Arner, Michaela Banta*, Rachel Bartsch, Anna Brown, Katherine Brown, Selah Brown, Samuel DeDominicis, Grace Film, Sara Haidet, Jacob Hansen, Meghan Harter, Zachary Haskell, Ryan Kast, Kaitlin Leach, Alivia Lepley, Zoe McKimmie, David Mullett, Harley Nunez, Alexis Pochubay, Reis Rankin, Isabella Rich, Wade Scott, Ciara Slusser, Bailey Spring, Ana Tahir, Lana Ulrich and Brianna Yacono.

Macedonia: Cade Aten.         

Madison: Jacob Brent.

Magnolia: Jared Eichelberger, Macie Faigley, Jillian Herstine* and Augustus Lancaster.

Malvern: Jordan Browning*.

Marietta: Jodan Weber.        

Massillon: Corban Aaron, Lauren Almes, Kaitlynn Arney, Vincent Arrigo*, Ron Bailey, Brock Barger, Elaine Bast, Leslie Bast, Cailin Brooks, Benjamin Burch, Gary Couch, Parker Crawford, Jacob Crow, Danielle Dalton, David Durham, Anthony Eaglowski*, Rebecca Farley, Micah Frye, Samuel Gentile, Christina Gillmore, Sophia Gough, Robyn Green, Benjamin Gregory, Kyle Gruber, Matigan Hammer*, Nicholas Hillyer, Mariah Hoffman, Bryan Hunt, Alec Johnson, Jessa Johnson, Kiara Lauer, Aubrey Lightfoot, Amanda Lint, Jacob Logozzo, Brittany Lucas, McKenzie Maxhimer, Schyler Maxhimer, Maria McDonald, Victoria Menches, Madeline Moore, Brooke Provance, Brittany Roush, Blake Seifert, Christopher Smer, Leah Snow, Brandy Snyder, Maranda Solomon, Brianna Specht, Daniel Stephan, Stevie Tabellion, Radley Tan, Haley Weller, David Wertz, Mikayla Wirkki, Wyatt Wright and Spencer Zolla.

Medina: Dylan Biehl.

Millersburg: Lucas Eastep*, Riley Hershberger and Kaleb Miller.

Mineral City: Holly Geisinger.

Minerva: Morgan Allen, Arec Burman, Paige Henman, Micah Rhodes, Jayden Strawder and Derek Zwahlen.

Mogadore: Ryleigh Butler, Mason Clapp, Tessa DiFrancesco, Miranda Etheredge, Chelsea Fernandez, Baylie Huth, Macy Martin, Jessica May, Justin Mills*, Brianna Moore, Haley Pettit, Amanda Roberts, Miranda Rosato, Savanna Rosato, Bri Specht, Sarah Speicher* and Hannah Vaughn.

Monroeville: Maddison Wichman*.

Mount Eaton: Donovan Byler.

Navarre: Joshua Boggs, Andrew Foradas, Mary Hammel*, Christian Hartley, Ottie Hosler, Hanna Jones*, Maria Jones, Abigail Klein, Payton Lutz, Brittany Parker, Trinity Tackett, Justin Wilcox and Rebecca Wilson.

New Carlisle: Sylvia Ward.

New Franklin: Brittany Alterio*, Jaycie Brooks*, Amanda Cox, Neil Hoxworth, Taleb Husein, Kayla Maloof, Breanna McCartney, Ian McCartt, Cory Mcvaney, Dustin Nist, Holly Palmer, Samantha Riffle, Camille Tenney, Emily Tenney and Noah-Patrick Wandling*.

New Philadelphia: Tyler Baker, Riley Meese, Sabrina Murch, Rebekah Orellana* and Marcia Trouts.

Newton Falls: Morgan Cottrell and Joshua Warren.

North Canton: Paige Acito, Joseph Artimez, Samantha Battista, Nickolet Biedenbach, Siretha Brinker, Vy Bui, Seana Byard, Jenna Covalesky*, Alyssa Durocher, Delayna Durr*, Daniel Earley, Conrad Edmisten, Hayden Evans, Kayla Fehlman, Jack Forsyth, Amanda Fowler*, Olivia Futo, George Gilbert, Mackenzie Gilliland, Maliq Goncalves, Micah Goncalves, Madisyn Husted, Matthew Jones, Emma Kirkbride, Caleb Kovach, Ivy Lee, Nicholas Mauser, Kelsey Merritt, Thomas Metz, Katelynn Meyer, Dharma Nason, Emily Orsich, Rachelle Phillips, Kevin Russo, Thomas Sarver, Madison Shaw, Katelynne Smith, Zachary Snyder, Giselle Spaulding, Madison Swartzentruber*, Max Taki, Taylor Vanderveen, McKenna Vega, Malia Weaver, Adrienne Weiner, Austin Young and Matthew Zehnder.

North Jackson: Abigail Hartman.      

North Lawrence: Tyler Boyd, Anthony DeGregory, Jacob Hershberger, Brennan Shirley and Joe Viront.

North Royalton: Nicholas Tomola.   

Norton: Thomas Bullock, Megan Somerick and Misty Thompson.

Orrville: Emma Whalen.

Orwell: Stephanie McCartney.          

Painesville: Olivia Parsons.

Paris: Ruth Hrusch.

Peninsula: Trinity Judy.

Plain City: Rebekah Snyder.

Ravenna: Tyler Braden, Jack Buckey, Samantha Dunlavey, Paige Henson, Samantha Smith and Hannah Wallis.

Salem: Matthew Carson, Barbara Gross, Dennis McCracken and Jordan McGuire.

Salineville: Shelbee Stidom.

Scio: Casey Herndon.

Stow: Joshua Blasko, Carmen Brooks, Zachery Daisher, Jennifer Davis and Katie Flynn*.

Strasburg: Kayla Crawshaw, Donovan Davis, Richelle Leatherman and Rachel Slankard.

Strongsville: Megan Krych.

Sugarcreek: Amanda Miller*.

Tallmadge: Toni Boling, Christopher Conti, Maria Fortseras, Emily Francis, Ali Lancaster and Madison Meszaros*.         

Uhrichsville: Emily Shuss and Caleigh Weaver.

Uniontown: Mason Batty, Deborah Belintani Rosa, Bryce Black, Jonathan Brooke, Anthony Clement, Kiersten Congrove, Stacey Ferrell*, Shawn Fowler, Thomas Gray, Luke Greenlee, Edward Henderson, Jacob Hershberger, Jillian Hockwalt, Tailor Johnson, Madeline Kurtz, Azia Layman, Ashley Lehmier, Kirstin Lengel, Savanna McElwain, Sierra McElwain, Abigail McGhee, Samuel Merendino, Abigail Miller*, Taylor O’Lear, Kara Parsons, Allison Pierce, Heather Pinney, Allison Portman, Trevor Rimmele, Jacob Rummell, Clayton Spicer, Erin Stewart, Olivia Terranova, Alison Troyer, Tyler VanNatten, Jesse Villers and Kaitlyn Wallace.

Wadsworth: Amanda Browning*, Ian Lamb, Nathaniel Davis and Tyler Gnatowski.

Warren: Marina Brockway.   

Waynesburg: McKenzie Haidet, Lucas Kail and Hanzala Khalid*.                

West Salem: Jamie Campbell and Raini Hershey.

Willoughby: Dylan Kohl.

Windham: Cassidie Maur.

Wooster: Cody Bennett and Alexander Yost.

Youngstown: Lloya Hopkins and Evann Maxwell.

Zoar: Dominic Carosielli.       

Undisclosed address: Evangeline Agum, Kirk Baglia, Alexandra Cumo and Katelyn Mizener.        

 
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Beijing, China: Yizhen Meng, Yucong Sun, Yifei Xu and Haoxiang Zhao.

Mexico City, Mexico: Pablo Castillo Gomez.

Shanxi, China: Yuchi Nie.

Tongren, China: Xingyu Liu.

Xiantao, China: Xiaomiqi Yang.

       

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Dean Denise A. Seachrist (center) is pictured with longtime donor, Sandie Kramer (left), and new donor, Barb Preston (right). Preston recently provided a much-needed match for Kent State University at Stark’s Giving Tuesday initiative, The Last Dollar Scholarship.
 

Kent State Stark students benefit from generous gifts. 

Barb Preston knows what it’s like to face a financial crisis. In fact, she was forced to drop out of the private liberal arts college she once attended. 

That’s why she didn’t hesitate to provide a much-needed match for Kent State University at Stark’s Giving Tuesday initiative, The Last Dollar Scholarship. 

“Donors can really make a difference at Kent State Stark,” said Preston, confident her gift will be life-changing for the students who need it most. “At the private school where I attended, my gift would have been meaningless, frankly. There, any dollar amount is a drop in the bucket of costly tuition. But here, it can make a real impact.”

For senior Cheyenne Clawson, whose daughter was born with a rare genetic disorder, The Last Dollar Scholarship has enabled her to continue her college education. And for recent graduate Steven Smith, who was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma while at Kent State Stark, the scholarship meant he could finish his bachelor’s degree while juggling his medical bills. 

It’s these stories that show financial gifts make all the difference to a student who is experiencing a life crisis, Preston said. 

It’s better to give

And she doesn’t shy away from the idea that fate played a role in her gift. So, how did Preston, who had no previous affiliation with Kent State Stark, find out about The Last Dollar Scholarship? 

“Well, it’s no question Giving Tuesday is a community effort at Kent State Stark,” explained Beth Fuciu, associate director of advancement. When Fuciu contacted a longtime donor to seek her support for the initiative, she was happy to make a $5,000 gift —with no strings, but a challenge, attached. 

Fuciu was challenged to find a second donor to match the gift. Fuciu contacted another loyal campus supporter, Sandie Kramer. Kramer, who passionately gives to her endowment supporting middle childhood education students, decided to ask her friend – Barb Preston – for some advice. 

When Preston, who had recently met Kramer at church while volunteering, heard that students in crisis were contemplating dropping out of college, she immediately decided to rise to the challenge. Preston agreed to be the second donor to provide a total of $10,000 in matching funds to The Last Dollar Scholarship drive.  

“This is a great Kent State Stark story,” said Fuciu. “Existing donors, new donors, a donor who pushes and challenges us, a donor who is so passionate about Kent State University that she tells her friends, and a new friend whose own challenges inspired her to help others, this is what giving is all about.”
 

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Sydney Cowles knows gridiron greatness is made in Stark County.

Sydney Cowles grew up just like many Stark County kids, with football Friday nights cheering for the hometown team. These days, her job takes her to the big leagues. It’s where she rubs elbows with the professional players who’ve made it to the ultimate stage: the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

As an event manager at the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, Sydney is living her dream.  

“When I was younger, our family reunions were always based around the Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival, especially the parade and the fashion show,” she said. “Now, being a part of organizing those events – what was such a great part of my childhood growing up – is really a dream coming true.”

This 2018 Kent State University at Stark graduate is looking forward to continuing to organize big events, such as the Fashion Show Luncheon, the Enshrinees’ Gold Jacket Dinner and the Enshrinees’ Roundtable, that draw national attention as 2020 approaches. The NFL will celebrate its 100th anniversary next year, with a centennial celebration that’s sure to kick off the league’s next century with style, right in the city where it was born: Canton, Ohio.

“I’m so thrilled I get to represent this great city, this great county and help make it the best that it can be,” said the 23-year-old Jackson Township native. “As an employee of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, I get to promote all of the wonderful things that our region has to offer. Of course, that means football, but it also means being a champion of all of the other great things happening.”

While majoring in Communications Studies at Kent State Stark, Sydney said she received a solid foundation in organizational communication. “I learned about events, social media and more, all of the tools you need to be successful communicating for organizations, both large and small,” she explained. 

Sydney credits all of the faculty with helping her excel, but gives special thanks to Associate Professor Erin Hollenbaugh, Ph.D., and Lisa Waite, a senior lecturer, M.A. 

“I switched my major because I just fell in love with Communication Studies because of their classes,” Sydney said. “And, Lisa (Waite), she helped me land an internship here at the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce, which eventually led to a full-time position. I’m very grateful to her for that.”

Caring faculty members – who propel futures – are a standout of Sydney’s academic career at the Stark Campus. “I’m better for what comes my way every day, and I’m ready to promote Stark County in the best way possible,” she said.

Whether it’s on football’s greatest stage, or a hometown Friday night, Sydney is one graduate making her mark in a big way. 
 

Friday, November 15, 2019

Pulitzer Prize-winning drama opens the 2019-20 Kent State Stark theatre season.

Kent State University at Stark Theatre will hold its first theatrical production of the 2019-20 season, “Proof”, a Pulitzer Prize-winning drama by playwright David Auburn.

The cast of “Proof” will take to the campus’ stage for opening night at 7:30 p.m. tonight in The Mary J. Timken Theatre, which is located in the expanded and renovated Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. 

Directed by Kent State Stark Theatre Director Jim Weaver, “Proof” is a passionate, intelligent story about fathers and daughters, the nature of genius and the power of love. The story develops around Catherine, who has inherited her late father’s mathematical brilliance, but is haunted by the fear that she might also share his debilitating mental illness. She has spent years caring for him and feels left alone to pick up the pieces until a newfound connection with Hal, one of her father’s former students, brings about “a groundbreaking proof.”

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. tonight and Saturday, and at 2 p.m. Sunday. The show also will take place at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 22 and 23, and at 2 p.m. Nov. 24.

Tickets for the show can be purchased online at www.kent.edu/stark/proof, by phone at 330-244-3348 or in person at the box office in the Fine Arts lobby. Will call opens one hour prior to performances. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for senior citizens and non-KSU students. Tickets are free to all Kent State students with student IDs.  
 

Thursday, November 07, 2019

Outstanding professors have comprehensive knowledge of their fields, effectively and resourcefully organize and present material, and stimulate student thinking and understanding.

Students, alumni, faculty and staff are invited to submit nominations for such an outstanding professor at Kent State Stark.

Based on your nominations, a member of the full-time faculty will be awarded the Distinguished Teaching Award, and an adjunct (part-time) faculty member will be the recipient of the Award of Distinction.

Award recipients will be announced in May. A selection committee consisting of Kent State Stark faculty and students will choose the recipients. 

The following criteria is used in the selection process:

  • Comprehensive knowledge of his or her field
  • Effectiveness in organizing and presenting material
  • Ability to stimulate thinking and develop understanding in students
  • Ability to arouse student interest
  • Demonstrated resourcefulness

These awards are not popularity contests. Simply submitting a faculty member's name is not enough. Only those nominations which thoroughly describe why the faculty member is outstanding (50 word minimum) will be forwarded to the selection committee.

Deadline to submit nominationsSunday, Dec. 15, 2019, at 11:59 p.m.

SUBMIT NOMINATION


Questions about the 2019-20 nomination process can be directed to:

Mason Shuman
Associate Lecturer of Spanish
Selection Committee Chair
mshuman1@kent.edu

Learn more about the Distinguished Teaching Award and Award of Distinction at Kent State Stark.
 

Monday, November 04, 2019

Turn your passion into your profession. Discover a career in music production and audio recording.

Kent State University at Stark offers a complete four-year curriculum in music technology. This program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music and is only offered at Kent State Stark.

Spend a day on campus with the music technology team!

MUSIC TECHNOLOGY PREVIEW DAY

Friday, Nov. 15, 2019
10:45 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Fine Arts | Kent State Stark

  • Talk shop with our highly-qualified music faculty
  • Discuss the program with current music tech students
  • Take a tour of the state-of-the-art audio and recording studios
  • Enjoy lunch and learn more about the admissions and advising process
  • Find out more about our beautiful, 200-acre campus

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION TODAY!

RESERVE MY SPOT FOR NOV. 15


CONTACT

Cindy Deng
Admissions Counselor
132 Main Hall
330-244-3238
cdeng@kent.edu

Friday, November 01, 2019

Cheyenne Clawson is set to graduate next year and make a better tomorrow for daughter Annabelle.

Rocks with jagged edges are no match for the hands of Annabelle Clawson. With a giggle and a firm grip, the gray ones, the red ones, the shiny and matte ones are scooped up in whatever the 4-year-old can muster, but mainly, her own two small hands.
 
The smile that comes afterward as she looks to her mother for, “a job well done,” is the kind of moment that Cheyenne Clawson lives for: when her child finds joy in the great outdoors and its endless possibilities.
 
It’s something Cheyenne shares with her daughter. A double major in geology and biology, this Canton mom is driven by nature, its cycles and rhythms. Cheyenne joins its primitive dance as she harkens her Native American ancestors whenever she gets a chance; namely, around drum circles at area festivals and historical reenactments.
 
“In everything that I do, Annabelle is my great motivator,” Cheyenne said. “She keeps me working to create a better life for her.”
 
Annabelle was born with a rare genetic disorder, septo-optic dysplasia, which affects early brain development including the optic nerves. She has undergone surgeries to restore limited vision, although Annabelle is legally blind.
 
This left Cheyenne at a crossroads. Facing major financial issues, including her daughter’s care, all signs pointed to dropping out of college.
 
“But I didn’t have another game plan, except continue to work toward my degree,” Cheyenne explained. “Annabelle’s pregnancy was difficult, and I had to retake some of those classes, consuming a large portion of my financial aid. Now, I’m within a year of graduating and my financial aid is running out. When I discovered that I might not have enough to graduate, I fell apart. To be so close, finally, and not be able to finish...”

Devastating.

Cheyenne turned to Kent State Stark’s financial aid representatives for help.

“I was nominated for the Last Dollar Scholarship, and I got it,” she said. “I cried in relief.”

Set to graduate next fall, Cheyenne is a firm believer in destiny.
 
“Everything happens for a reason, you know? You never know how one decision can so positively impact the life of another.”
 
It is these connections that nature swiftly depends upon, as certain as the changing seasons. Or the whisper of the wind. “No one can see it, but we know it’s there,” Cheyenne assures Annabelle as a gust kicks up some fallen leaves, changing their course.
 
And there are the tangible things that can be seen. Like the rocks used to build fairy castles by a 4-year-old girl. Their sharp, imperfect edges intertwine to create something beautiful. A place for capturing wishes and holding on tight, with two small hands, to the better future that lies ahead.
 
Make a wish come true today. Make a decision that has an impact for generations: the gift of an education.

Give to the Last Dollar Scholarship and help students, just like Cheyenne, make a better tomorrow for their families.

Steven Smith and his daughter, Nyah.
Friday, November 01, 2019

Now cancer-free, Steven Smith tells others, "Don’t give up."

Steven Smith faced the battle of his life. Diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in his mid-30s, Steven juggled cancer treatments, being a young father and completing the college coursework that he needed to earn his bachelor’s degree. And he was close. Close to beating cancer, close to Graduation Day.
 
But then, he encountered a financial crisis. One semester away from graduating, Steven’s funds had run out.
 
“It was tough. My options were gone,” he said.
 
Except for one: The Last Dollar Scholarship. Thanks to this fund, Steven was able to complete his degree.
 
“The Last Dollar Scholarship helped me cross the finish line, because I couldn’t have made it any other way,” he said. “It’s definitely an important tool. This scholarship really came through and helped me out when I needed it most.”
 
Today, Steven calls Plain Township home. He is cancer-free and inspires his daughter Nyah, a McKinley High School senior, to pursue a college education.
 
“I would tell anyone to stick it out and don’t give up. Keep moving. Put one foot in front of the other and finish your race.”
 
Please consider a donation to the Last Dollar Scholarship fund this Giving Tuesday and help students just like Steven. 
 
 

 

Tuesday, October 08, 2019

Kent State University at Stark will present Guitar Weekend, a three-day festival for guitar enthusiasts, Oct. 31 - Nov. 2.

Free and open to the public, the event is a celebration of all styles of guitar playing and features some of the most respected guitarists nationwide. 

Organized by Kent State Stark’s Music Department, Guitar Weekend hosts a series of concerts during the three-day span. 

Performances

 
The Dan Wilson Trio
Thursday, Oct. 31

7 p.m
114 Fine Arts | Rehearsal Hall
Kent State University at Stark

Join us opening night for the Dan Wilson Trio. Lead guitarist Dan Wilson has performed with the legendary Van Morrison, three-time Grammy nominated jazz organ legend Joey DeFrancesco, as well as many other nationally and internationally recognized musicians.

 
Jim Campilongo, Luca Benedetti and The Shootouts
Friday, Nov. 1

7:30 p.m.
The Auricle
201 Cleveland Ave. NW, Canton

Celebrate First Friday in downtown Canton with a free show featuring guitar legends Jim Campilongo and Luca Benedetti, as well as honky-tonk rockers The Shootouts.
 
Telecaster master Jim Campilongo has been performing since the 1970s with wide variety of notable artists, including Norah Jones, Bright Eyes, Cake, Nels Cline and Gillian Welch.
 
Luca Benedetti performs in a wide variety of roots, jazz, country and Americana-inspired projects, including his collaboration with Campilongo: Jim Campilongo & Honeyfingers. Their latest album, “Last Night, This Morning”, was hailed by Vintage Guitar as “a brilliant record with magic and artistry” and by Guitar Player magazine as “...a hoedown throwdown that looks to be one of the top guitar records of the year.”
 
The Shootouts, headed by Ryan Humbert, blend high-energy honky-tonk and traditional country music mixed with touches of Americana and western swing. They marry a blend of Roy Orbison and Bob Wills with the barn-burning sounds of Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives and Dwight Yoakam. The combination offers a welcome throwback to sounds that flowed out of Nashville, Texas and California in country music’s golden years.

 
Community Concert

Saturday, Nov. 2
12 p.m.
114 Fine Arts | Rehearsal Hall
Kent State University at Stark

The Community Concert features Kent State Stark students and Canton McKinley High School Guitar Program students under George Dean.

 
Duende // Krystin O’Mara and Ethan Miller
Saturday, Nov. 2

7 p.m.
114 Fine Arts | Rehearsal Hall
Kent State University at Stark

Join us on the final night for Duende, a collaboration of guitarist Krystin O’Mara and saxophonist Ethan Miller. A unique duo representing a fresh, new direction in contemporary classical music, Duende performs traditional classical repertoire with influences from Spanish, flamenco, jazz, Brazilian and world music, as well as commissioned works.

 
Learn more about Guitar Weekend.

Monday, October 07, 2019

Kent State University at Stark will host a Campus Preview for interested students and their families on Saturday, Oct. 26.

Campus tours, a faculty and resource fair and breakfast will be held from 8 to 9:30 a.m. The program will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Check-in takes place in the Main Hall Lobby.

Campus Preview will introduce prospective students to Kent State Stark’s academic programs, departments and services in an informal atmosphere to allow for questions and conversation. Attendees will meet with representatives from Kent State Stark’s Admissions, Financial Aid, Advising, Academic Support Services and Student Involvement, as well as faculty members.

Students can choose from 20-plus degree programs offered entirely at Kent State Stark. Students also can complete coursework toward more than 282 undergraduate programs at Kent State University.

Prospective students are encouraged to submit their Spring 2020 or Fall 2020 admission application during the event when the $40 application fee will be waived.

Attendees should RSVP by Oct. 24.

RESERVE YOUR SPOT FOR CAMPUS PREVIEW

Visit the Campus Preview website for more information.

Thursday, October 03, 2019

Kent State University at Stark will be transformed into “Boo U” on Oct. 24 for an evening of family friendly fun.

Kent State Stark will host the 11th annual educational fall celebration for elementary school-aged children from 5 to 7 p.m. at its campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. 

Boo U is free and open to the public.

Children can trick or treat at stations designed and decorated by Kent State Stark student organizations. Trick-or-treating starts at the main parking lot off Frank Avenue NW.

The event also features several family-oriented activities, including games, a photo station and more. During the “Swamp Walk,” families are invited to tour the pond and learn about wetland research by Kent State Stark students. 

Some candy distributed during this event may contain nuts, eggs, soy, wheat, gluten, milk products and other food allergens. Parents are encouraged to dress children appropriately, as activities take place outside – rain or shine.

For more information on Boo U, visit www.kent.edu/stark/boo-u-fall-festival.
 

Friday, September 06, 2019

NASCAR racer and STEM advocate Julia Landauer is the first speaker in 2019-20 Featured Speakers Series.

A two-time champion NASCAR driver, Julia Landauer became the highest finishing female in the NASCAR K&N Pro Series’ 64-year history. A proponent of women’s empowerment, this Stanford University graduate also is an advocate for STEM education. 

Landauer is the first presenter in this year’s Featured Speakers Series lineup. She will speak at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1. 

Now in its 29th year, the Featured Speakers Series is free and open to the public, but tickets are required and limited to two per person. 

Tickets for Landauer’s presentation are available beginning at 7:30 a.m. Monday, Sept. 9, at the Main Hall information desk. Tickets will remain available, while supplies last, during regular business hours 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. 

Landauer began her motivational speaking career with a TEDx Talk and has collaborated with companies, such as Spotify and Disney/Pixar, and serves as an external advisor to Hyundai Motor Corporation’s Center for Robotic-Augmented Design in Living Experience.

In 2017, Landauer was named to Forbes Magazine’s top 30 under 30 list for sports. She also was a contestant on Season 26 of the reality TV show “Survivor”.

Following Landauer on Oct. 1, the Featured Speakers Series will present Bryan Terrell Clark, star of the Broadway hit “Hamilton: An American Musical” on March 10.

Programs are held in Timken Great Hall at the Kent State University at Stark Conference Center. Doors open at 6:45 p.m.

For more information, visit www.kent.edu/stark/featured-speakers-series.
 

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

The community is invited to attend a number of free, cultural events at Kent State University at Stark.

The campus will host dozens of activities, ranging from Guitar Weekend to the 50th commemoration of May 4, 1970, and the 2019-20 Featured Speakers Series.


FEATURED SPEAKERS SERIES

Showcasing a diverse lineup of notables, the 2019-20 Featured Speakers Series will kick off with NASCAR racer Julia Landauer on Oct. 1. A two-time champion NASCAR driver, Landauer became the highest finishing female in the NASCAR K&N Pro Series’ 64-year history. A proponent of women’s empowerment, this Stanford University graduate also is an advocate for STEM education. 

On March 10, 2020, Broadway star Bryan Terrell Clark, of the record-breaking hit “Hamilton: An American Musical”, will speak as part of the series. Clark is a singer-songwriter, philanthropist and actor who made his Broadway debut playing the iconic role of Marvin Gaye in “Motown: The Musical”. He is the co-founder of the philanthropic lifestyle brand inDEFINED, which supports arts education programs for at-risk youth.

In its 29th year, the Featured Speakers Series has brought dozens of national and international experts and entertainers to the region, giving community members the opportunity to learn about a wide range of topics and issues that shape our world.   

Each program will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Kent State Stark Conference Center, located off University Drive NW on the Stark Campus. All lectures are free and open to the public; however, tickets are required. A limited number of tickets per person will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis, at the Main Hall information desk beginning at 7:30 a.m. Sept. 9 for Landauer and Feb. 17 for Clark’s lecture. For additional information, visit www.kent.edu/stark/featured-speakers-series.


GUITAR WEEKEND

The campus will host Guitar Weekend Oct. 31-Nov. 2, featuring nationally recognized guitarists, including jazz guitarist Dan Wilson who has played with Van Morrison and Jim Campilongo of singer Norah Jones’ band The Little Willies. Guitar Weekend is open to guitar enthusiasts of all levels. Visit www.kent.edu/stark/guitar-weekend for more information.


PERFORMANCE ARTS

THEATRE
The Mary J. Timken Theatre at Kent State University at Stark will present the following plays during the academic year: 

“Proof” by David Auburn
Nov. 15-17, 22-24
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, David Auburn’s “Proof” is a passionate, intelligent story about fathers and daughters, the nature of genius and the power of love.

“The Nerd” by Larry Shue
March 6-8, 13-15
Set in Terre Haute, Indiana, in late 1979, “The Nerd” centers around the hilarious dilemma of a young architect, who is visited by a fellow ex-GI whom he has never met but saved his life after he was seriously wounded in Vietnam.

“May 4th Voices Kent State, 1970” by David Hassler
April 17-19, 24-26
“May 4th Voices” brings together first-person narratives about the May 4, 1970, shootings at Kent State University. The play is composed of verbatim excerpts from the Kent State Shootings Oral History Project.

For tickets and more information, visit www.kent.edu/stark/theatre.

MUSIC
Visit www.kent.edu/stark/music-events for more on the nearly two dozen free concerts offered at the campus’ newly renovated and expanded Fine Arts Building.

ART
Check out www.kent.edu/stark/art-exhibitions for the academic year’s art exhibitions, including the 66th annual Scholastic Art Awards and Exhibition Jan. 13-29.


BLACK HISTORY MONTH

In February, the popular Wallace Coleman Band will be back as part of the campus’ Black History Month celebration, with more events to be announced. 


50th COMMEMORATION OF MAY 4, 1970

This spring, the 50th commemoration of May 4, 1970, will represent a significant and historic milestone not only for the university, but for the country as well. 

Beginning in the fall and continuing through May 4, 2020, Kent State University and its Regional Campuses will honor the 50th commemoration with a yearlong observance of educational programs and events, in addition to the traditional commemoration activities. 

The commemoration provides an opportunity for all to remember and honor the tragic events of May 4, 1970, that occurred on the Kent State University campus. On that day, members of the Ohio National Guard killed four students protesting the Vietnam War and wounded nine others. For more information, visit www.kent.edu/may4kentstate50.
 

 

Thursday, August 22, 2019

Dear students and campus community,

Hello! I am so happy to begin this new academic year with all of you. For some, today is a “welcome back.” For others, it’s a “welcome home.” We greet you, Class of 2023, with open arms.

You will discover that Kent State University at Stark is a special place. From our stellar faculty to our supportive staff, we are working together to make this year a game changer. 

Now is the time for all of us to excel personally, academically, and professionally, because we have found a home at our hometown university.

As your dean, you can count on my commitment to this campus and its best interest. We have everything that it takes – especially our students, faculty and staff – to make a meaningful mark on our community and to reach new and greater heights. 

We have so many exciting things planned for this academic year – from our festive Homecoming Week (Sept. 16-21) to the 50th commemoration of May 4, 1970. We also have plans for the construction of a new elevator and façade for Main Hall.

And that’s not to mention the incredible education happening in classrooms across this exceptional campus! We are proud of the fact that our everyday research is making way for life-changing discoveries. 

Our students get to work alongside renowned faculty members – with research recognized nationally by The Washington Post, CNN, and PBS. From studying the feeding habits of butterflies to the business applications of virtual reality to top nursing techniques and even cancer research, students get practical experience with faculty experts. 

Wow! Kent State Stark is truly a place to be proud of, and it is all of you who make the difference.

I am certain that you share my excitement as, across the campus, we say “welcome back” and “welcome home” today. 

Welcome all to this promising, new academic year. We write our campus’ next chapter together.

 
With best regards,
 
Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D.
Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
 

Monday, July 29, 2019

Daylong seminar aims to equip young professionals with skills needed for workplace success.

In an effort to better equip the region’s young professionals with skills needed for success in the workplace, Kent State University at Stark’s Corporate University is pleased to offer the 2019 Young Professionals Conference.

The daylong session will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 16 at Kent State Stark’s Conference Center, 6000 Frank Ave. NW.

Created by an advisory board of young professionals, the 2019 Young Professionals Conference is an ideal opportunity for participants to network with next-generation leaders, learn critical workplace skills and discover new strategies for guiding success in career and life.

This year’s conference theme, “Being a 2.0 Person in a 1.0 World”, focuses on equipping today’s young professional with tools and techniques for succeeding in the workplace and beyond, said Faith Sheaffer-Polen, director of the Corporate University. “The conference presenters are professionals from multiple disciplines; they are experts in their field and have firsthand knowledge of the value of real-world experience,” she said.

  • Presenters include: Sarah Andreas, Ph.D., organizational leadership expert and founder of WiseWood LLC; Lisa Stouffer, M.B.A., founder of Cephala Recruiting and Consulting LLC; Kelly Piero, M.A., director of the Canton Regional Chamber of Commerce’s Ystark! program; Jeannie Cool, M.S. Ed., LPCC-S, CDCA, OCPSA, manager of programs and evaluation at Stark County Mental Health and Addiction Recovery (StarkMHAR); Darlene Thompson, Ph.D., a senior talent manager (SVP) at KeyBank; and Aly Brine, M.A., human resources consultant at Marathon Petroleum, who will moderate a discussion with panelists: 
    • Matthew Kinlow, West Medical Inc.
    • Molly McDougal, The Karcher Group
    • Betty Smith, EN-RICH-MENT
    • Jeff Solosky, M.A., Diebold Nixdorf Software

The conference agenda includes the following session topics in which participants will learn:

  • How to create your own career path and skill-building plans
  • How to have difficult conversations in the workplace and discover techniques to maintain composure while communicating key messages
  • The key aspects for creating a strong and successful professional network
  • The difference between generations in the workplace and how to thrive across generations
  • How to develop an individualized plan for self-care
  • How to champion new ideas, create win-win situations, and drive individual and group results

For more information, visit www.bitly.com/Register-StarkYPC. The cost of the conference is $245, or $215 for multiple registrants. To register, call Mona Zink at 330-244-3508 between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Monday, July 15, 2019

Campus leads county in undergraduate research and innovation.

Carefully watering the garden, Kristy Doering knew what was just beneath the soil would take some time to grow. Seeds she once held in the palm of her hand would yield 50 pounds of fresh produce to feed Stark County’s food insecure.
 
While she always could imagine with certainty the plants producing vegetables, she was encouraged to take a chance on researching how a local, small-scale campus gardening project could make a big impact.
 
“There’s a lot of need in this region that I think people are unaware of,” said the 2018 graduate of Kent State University at Stark. “It was really eye-opening to document the amount of people without access to food and how we can change that for our community.”
 
Everyday research becomes life-changing discoveries at Kent State Stark, where students, like Doering, work alongside renowned faculty members – with research recognized nationally by The Washington Post, CNN and PBS. From studying social media habits to the business applications of virtual reality to top nursing techniques, students get practical experience with faculty experts.  

They perform cancer research in the classroom of Professor P. Bagavandoss, Ph.D., where students are using phytochemicals to inhibit ovarian cancer cell growth. While Professor Matthew Lehnert, Ph.D., and his students publish original academic research documenting the way insects ingest fluids as a model for targeted delivery of disease-fighting drugs.

Other undergraduate researchers have worked alongside their professors to restore Sippo Lake’s 4.3-acre Cottonwood Wetland and even discover a new species of crab that swam the world’s seas 95 million years ago.

“The caliber of the research we do exemplifies the fact that we are Kent State University, a large research institution with world-class faculty and state-of-the-art facilities, located right here in Stark County,” said Dean Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D. “We provide the immeasurable value of an affordable, quality education where students can live, work and give back to their community.”

‘CREATING THE SOLUTIONS’

Before Doering graduated from Kent State Stark in December, she served with AmeriCorps VISTA at StarkFresh, a not-for-profit group that operates a mobile grocery market and encourages urban farming. Her work was about more than peddling vegetables; for Doering, it was finding new ways to feed the hungry.

These days, the professor who encouraged her to research food insecurity gives his students a firsthand glimpse of the greenhouses along Rowland Avenue NE in downtown Canton. In the city block once known for its “Turtle Park”, peppers, garlic and eggplant grow in rows to feed pockets of the community who have little access to fresh produce.

“It is extremely important for students to see this,” said Professor Chris Post, Ph.D., who worked with Doering and other students in the Environmental Studies program, one of more than 20 bachelor’s degrees offered entirely at Kent State Stark. “Like with every teaching opportunity, you trust students will go on to do exponentially bigger things.”

Tom Phillips, executive director of StarkFresh, recently welcomed Post’s summer class to the Canton facility.

“This hands-on learning experience can guide students toward their passion. It ignites something within them: How can I help? How do I help my community?,” Phillips said. “Together, the faculty and students at Kent State Stark are creating the solutions Stark County needs through research, collaboration and innovation.”

‘TOMORROW’S IDEAS TODAY’

A primary goal of Kent State is to engage the communities in which its eight campuses are located to fuel research, foster partnerships and economic development.

“As the county’s public university, our role is to transform the community and to transform lives. We are impacting the future and helping to better Stark County,” Seachrist said. “We are the incubator for tomorrow’s ideas today.” 

And for Doering, now raising her own children, she understands the seeds we sow today can change the course of a life. 

“It has changed mine.” 


RESEARCH DRIVEN, CLOSE-KNIT CAMPUS

With a student-to-faculty ratio of 17:1, Kent State University at Stark students have the opportunity to obtain a Kent State University degree at a regional-campus rate while taking courses taught by professors who know them by name. That is one reason why 92 percent of seniors report in the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) that they would choose the campus all over again.

To find out more about the many research opportunities and academic programs at Kent State University at Stark, visit www.kent.edu/stark or follow the university on social media @KentStateStark.

Special to The Canton Repository appearing on June 30, 2019.

Melissa Griffy Seeton is the coordinator for public relations and media communications at Kent State University at Stark.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

It is the best decision you’ll ever make.

And here’s why:

You will have the hometown advantage at Kent State University at Stark, your ticket to a world-class education. Close-to-home and close-knit, your professors care about your individual success.

A regional campus tuition rate means you will get a Kent State degree without accumulating the debt your parents did. 

Did we mention that you’ll have lots of opportunities to participate in research – if that’s your thing. Or, study abroad – if that’s your thing. At Kent State Stark, you’ll find what makes you uniquely YOU.

Why wait any longer? 

The deadline to apply for admission is Aug. 15. By applying now, we’ll waive the application fee. That’s a $40 savings!

Apply Now

Get Started

Got questions?

Let us help. Contact the Office of Student Services today at 330-244-3251.
 

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Spring 2019 President's & Dean's Lists

The following students have been named to the Kent State Stark Dean’s List. Those students designated with a star (*) have been named to the Kent State University President’s List.

Requirements for the Dean’s List include a 3.40 grade point average or above for the spring 2019 semester and at least 12 letter-graded (A, B, etc.) credit hours completed by the end of the semester. President’s List criteria are a 4.00 grade point and at least 15 letter-graded credit hours completed by the end of the semester. 

Akron: Sydnie Barnette, Constance Bozeman, Kari Burns, Karen Busch, Dakota Cobb, Parker Derrig, Hollie Fry, Nathan Geiger, Tyler Gray, Ross Grismer, Nick Hayden, Kristi Karickhoff, Cecilia Lopez, Navarre Medlock, Shanae Moss, Dylan Nesbitt, Brooke Oldaker, Maya Pryor, Renee Robinette, James Schindewolf, Suzanne Shaffer, Patiance Sloan, Kathy Snider-Buchanan, Innocencia Sphapmixay, Raneshia Virden, Autumn Wassam, Hailey Weidlich, Ashley Wilson and Jesse Wood.

Alliance: Daniel Amsden-Michel, Alexiz Black, Madison Frase, Brock Himmelheber, Shaelah Lopes, Joseph Mayes, Katie Mikes, Jessica Morton, Terri Pelger, Trey Phillips, Jaquiez Sampson, Lynnita Toussant and Augustine Warner.

Atwater: Autumn Browning, Gregory Cain, Maylee Cannon, Haylee Hermann, Viktoria Kaminski, Savanah VanSteenberg and Randall Wise.

Aurora: Cory Witmer.

Barberton: Kara Morey, Cole Nichols, Luke Overmire, Dez Rader, Katherine Seiter, Rachel Seitz and Heather Sykes.

Beach City: Brandy Bishop and Caprice Swedren.

Bengaluru, Karnataka: Tejasvini Mavuleti.

Bethesda: Sydney Terry.

Bolivar: Breanna Burrier, Jennifer Haught, Leda McConaha*, Katelynn Pennington, Abraham Robinette and Gabrielle Tausch*.

Brewster: Erycka Byer, Rachael Childs, Zane Fisher, Brianna Pulley, Gabrielle Russo*, Juliana Spivey and Adam Tucker.

Canal Fulton: Angelica Aronson, Sydney Boser, Kylie Collmar, Reagan Fincher, Erin Giroux, Patrick Glaser, Jenna Graves, Anna Henson, Briana Horvath, Austin Kelleher, Hannah Messner and Brittany Yurick. 

Canton: Alexis Armstead, Macy Banner, Michael Bechara, An'Jeanette Beverly, Matthew Blanton, Jacob Blose, Jacob Bohon, Ashley Braham, Makenzea Briggs, Mara Brinker, Cailin Brooks, Julia Brooks, Nancy Brown, Dora Brumbaugh, Xena Burden, Andrew Burwell, Benjamin Cochran, Alexandra Cumo, Maya Demchak, Zhanri Desphy, Marissa DiMichele, Gabriela Drewes, Amber Duncan, Jackie Dycus, Theodore ElFaye, Derek Firth, Victoria Fleming, Jamila Freeman, Matthew Grasse, Patrick Halle, Morgan Hancock, Charlie Harless, Sydney Hathaway, Nicholas Heiser, Matthew Herttna, Skylyn Hooks, Mason Hoopingarner, Hayley Horvath, Fredrick Hutson, Mitch Jacovetty, Jessa Johnson, Gavin Johnson, Emma Johnson, Dylan Kelsey, Joshua Kerr*, Nicala Labus, Emma Laughman, Lauren Lautzenheiser, Katelynn Leach, Anthony Leighton*, Emma Lewers, Erykah Lofton, Danielle Lohr, Christian Lucas, Zachary Martin, Daniel Maurer, Shante Mays, Robert McBride, Chelsey McCaulley, Tyler McClellan, Gabriel McPherson, Nathanael McPherson, Dylan Mease, Maddison Miles*, Samantha Miller, Alicia Millican, Heather Monnot, Phong Nguyen, Angelia Nicolardi, Mia Owens*, Gabrielle Parcher, Makaila Rhoads, Kamarin Ricker, Kent Ring, Lauren Rogers*, Lauren Rooney, Nicole Sanderson, Michael Savoldi, Matthew Sherlin*, Selena Shirkey, Courtney Smith, Lyndsey Smith, Brittany Spangler*, Brianna Sprout, Alexander Sweeney, Lauren Tarver, Alexis Taylor, Abigail Thouvenin*, Michael Tovissi, Sara Townsend, Ann Trissel, Emily Tyler, Kaiya Tyler, Kaitlyn Unklesbay*, Kathleen Vogt, Emily Vossen, Taylor Vossen, Laura Wadsworth, William Waller, Megan Wasik*, Hailey Weaver, Taylor Weaver, Braden Wehrenberg, Sarah Weinstock*, Sydney Weiss, Jared Wilson, Victoria Wolfe and Joseph Zino.

Carrollton: Robert Husted, Alivia Kinney, Zara Pyles* and Morgan Timberlake.

Chagrin Falls: Samuel Keiper and Bryce Nola.

Clinton: Timothy Haines, Zachary Harvey, Kathleen McKee, Zoe Polacheck and Jenifer Saunier.

Copley: Staci Wages, Jordan and Sydney Ziss.

Coshocton: Benjamin Mikulik.

Coventry Township: Joseph Marchese and Joseph Schermesser.

Cuyahoga Falls: Casondra Backer, Benjamin Chandler, Nichole Clegg, Stephanie Dunn, Bronson Luksza, Eric Martinez, Carlie Myers, James Sherwood-Engel and Mary Weahry.

Dalton: Jordyn Lucas and Jacob Thompson.

Dellroy: Baylee Drakulich.

Dennison: Jillian Keen.

Dover: Audrea Beamer, Kearsten Johnson, Jewell Lewis, Ashley Rader and Broc Siegenthaler.

Doylestown: Kendall Evard* and Allison Popelka.

East Canton: Audriana Nichols, Mickala Roberts and Walter Wilks.

East Rochester: Lane Elton.

East Sparta: Alicia Costello, Olivia Costello, Brooke Jenkins and Julia Majzun.

Fairlawn: Brice and Leah Miller.

Fredericksburg: Ariel Walker.

Geneva: Bryan Whitten.

Hartville: Megan Behon , Zachariah Brockway, Zachary Cino, Sean Cooley, Alec Ginther, Joshua Hershberger, Cameron Jones, Aaron McComas, Jared Oblisk, Mary Peach, Brendan Romigh, Emma Sanders   , Corey Velasquez, Robert Watson and Olivia Yoder*.   

Kampala, Uganda: Evangeline Pacific*.

Kensington: Cameron Haught.

Kent: Isabelle Cullen.

Lakemore: George Hayden*.

Loudonville: Shawn Hartney.

Louisville: Julianne Agnone, Emily Anderson, Kory Arner, Michaela Banta, Rachel Bartsch           , Amanda Blind, Loretta Bonam, Katherine Brown, Ashley Evans, Matthew Haidet*, Sara Haidet*, Meghan Harter, Alex Hewitt, Emily Hollifield, Brianna Horton, Adam Ivey, Mary Karcher, Ashley Light, Derek Mazak, Madison Miller, Theno Pantelides*, Alexis Pochubay, Reis Rankin, Haley Shadle, Ana Tahir, Josie Thomas* and Brianna Yacono.  

Madison: Jacob Brent.

Magnolia: Madeline Bland*, Olivia Bland, Rebecca Boyd, Allison Eyster*, Macie Faigley, Scott Johnson*, Augustus Lancaster, Taina Stratton and Alexis Zehnder.

Malvern: Jordan Browning, Julia Fenbers and Amanda McCann.

Massillon: Corban Aaron, Vincent Arrigo, Dylan Beadle, Victor Berni, Victoria Bowen, Jade Brundelet*, Noah Cantera, Gary Couch, David Durham, Julia Endress, Lindsey Foradas, Ethan Friedrich, Kellsey Galart, Michaela Gifford, Sophia Gough*, Kyle Gruber, Pailey Harris, Daytona Hedrick, Sidney Heid, Mallory Henderson, Mariah Hoffman, Amy Hollingsworth, Elizabeth Hout, Dana Humrighouse, Alec Johnson, Jason Lacourt, Kiara Lauer, Aubrey Lightfoot, Brenna Lightfoot, Joe Longo, Rebecca Malich, Blake Mendez, Nicholas Nonno, Rebecca Ohm, Alexander Pearsall, Brittany Roush, Christa Salewsky, Joshua Seefong, Dillon Smith, Brandy Snyder*, Makayla Stone, Stevie Tabellion, Radley Tan, Johnathan Theis, Lexee Valentine, Jason Williams, Mikayla Wirkki, Stephanie Wrest and Maggie Zaleski*.

Medina: Katelynn Burns and Eric Suboticki.

Millersburg: Lucas Eastep and Riley Hershberger.

Mineral City: Holly Geisinger.

Minerva: Arec Burman, Cody Davis*, Sara Thompson and Derek Zwahlen.

Mogadore:  Mason Clapp, Miranda Etheredge, Chelsea Fernandez, Jenna Fleming, Baylie Huth, Jena Marion, Macy Martin, Brianna Moore, Haley Pettit, Micaela Pope, Amanda Roberts, Miranda Rosato and Sarah Speicher*.

Monroeville: Maddison Wichman.

Mount Eaton: Donovan Byler*.

Munroe Falls: Holly Underwood.

Navarre: Alyssa Birchler , Joshua Boggs, Chloe Chapman, Lyndsay Cole, Lauren Engle, Ottie Hosler, Maria Jones, Hanna Jones, Abigail Klein, Drew LeBoeuf*, Chase Lutes, Payton Lutz*, Seth Ramsey and Jordan Smith.       

Negley: Lindsey Doughty.        

New Franklin: Brittany Alterio, Julia Banks, Amanda Coteat, Amanda Cox, Neil Hoxworth, Ian McCartt, Dustin Nist, Emily Tenney, Victoria Wamsley and Joshua Wenhold.

New Philadelphia: Chloe Adams, Tyler Baker, Malaya Henry, Abigail Kneuss, Spencer Morgan, Hannah Reedy, Marcia Trouts and Elizabeth Winters.       

Newton Falls: Morgan Cottrell.

North Canton: Leah Andaloro*, Lucia Arteaga, Anya Brown, Vy Bui, Michael Burleson, Ashley Candea, Jenna Covalesky, Sean Dick, Alyssa Durocher, Delayna Durr, Daniel Earley, Justin Eckman, Andrew Falce*, Jack Forsyth, Amanda Fowler*, Olivia Futo, George Gilbert, Micah Goncalves, Madisyn Husted, Alex Kiel*, Caleb Kovach, Ivy Lee, Molly Lewis, Ishika Mahajan, Camden Malachowski*, Nicholas Mauser, Alexandra Miller, Katelyn Mizener, Marissa Mountain, Andrew Mulvey, Dharma Nason, Donald Natale, Zachary Oatley*, Rachelle Phillips, Faith Romans, Tyler Ross, Larissa Russert, Kevin Russo, Mark Shelton, Austin Sklack, Katelynne Smith, Dylanni Smith, Zachary Snyder, Giselle Spaulding, Taylor Vanderveen, Andrew Varn, Aric Walker, Malia Weaver, Adrienne Weiner and Trevor Woodyard*.

North Lawrence: Anthony DeGregory.

North Royalton: Nicholas Tomola.

Norton: Thomas Bullock, Rebecca Hill and Noah Kornas.

Orwell: Margaret McCartney.

Paris: Ruth Hrusch.

Plain City: Rebekah Snyder.

Ravenna: Paige Henson and Samantha Smith.

Richfield: Stephanie Bierman.

Rootstown: Morgan Youngblood*.

Salem: Billie Beeson, Matthew Carson, Alisha Hayter and Abigail Steer.

Salineville: Casey Carman and Shelbee Stidom.

Sandyville: Cassidy Tope.

Scio: Casey Herndon.

Seville: Olivia Metzger and Michaela Schroeder.

Silver Lake: Austin D'Avello.

Stow: Kaleigh Dye, Alexis Gilbert, Carter Merk, Monique Rovelsky, Kaitlyn Rueschman and Sarah Wickstrom.     

Strasburg: Donovan Davis, Richelle Leatherman and Rachel Slankard.   

Streetsboro: Jake Famageltto.

Sugarcreek: Miranda Click.

Tallmadge: Toni Boling, John Coyne, Maria Fortseras, Brittani Frick, Mariah Groetz, Jaime Hylton, Madison Meszaros and Daphnie Neal*.

Torrance, California: Lilyana Sacramone.          

Uhrichsville: Caleigh Weaver.

Uniontown: John Barnett, Rachel Bindreiter, Bryce Black, Collin Brink, Jonathan Brooke, Kelsey Casenhiser, Anthony Clement, Kiersten Congrove, Andrew Engle, Amber Foster, Elisabeth Giles, Krista Harland, Jeanine Hasan, Jillian Hockwalt, Merlayna Kauffman, Bethany Kuebler*, Azia Layman, Ashley Lehmier, Kristen Matheny, Sierra McElwain, Savanna McElwain, Samuel Merendino, Hunter Mihal, Ethan Miller, Abigail Miller, Carly Nevinski, Kara Parsons*, Allison Pierce, Elizabeth Rambler, Jacob Rummell, Matthew Rummell, Alyssa Schippert, BreAnna Schwartz, Clayton Spicer, Erin Stewart, Alison Troyer, Andrew Unger, Joseph van 't Hooft, Tyler VanNatten, Kaitlyn Wallace and Liliana Yerrick.

Vienna: Shaylynn Johnson.

Wadsworth: Tyler Gnatowski, Ian Lamb, Molly Lamb, Link Maynard and Rachel Molloy.

Waynesburg: Juliana Borsellino, McKenzie Haidet and Hanzala Khalid.

Wellsville: Noah Palmer.

West Salem: Jamie Campbell*.

Wooster: Steven Freyman, Hannah Sanchez and Alexander Yost.

Youngstown: Pamela Lott.

Zoarville: Haley Reed.

Undisclosed address: Jaret Aubiel, Gracey James and Ryan Parrish.

       

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

The College Credit Plus program introduces students to transformational power of higher education.

Marlington Dukes’ star forward Alivia Lepley knows what it means to have the home-court advantage: everyone is rooting for you. That’s why Lepley’s No. 1 choice for college is Kent State University at Stark, where she’ll have the hometown advantage.
 
A top-rated, competitive nursing program right in her own backyard? The exceptional program at Kent State Stark will be a win-win for this 2019 Marlington High School graduate, who is used to finishing the season strong. As she begins the next leg of her academic journey, the Marlboro Township athlete says she knows she has found a university where she can develop her purpose and claim her future.
 
She’ll follow in the footsteps of her sister-in-law, Sierra Lepley, who is a recent graduate of the Stark Campus nursing program. Sierra is now working as a nurse practitioner. 

Alivia Lepley also is sure to meet fellow nursing students like Isabelle Cullen, who traveled to Rwanda this spring as part of faculty-led study abroad. And Lepley says she’s ready for such opportunity, whether that means visiting a foreign country or traveling to America’s Last Frontier, where recent nursing graduate Joel Hukill is making his mark in Alaska as a flight nurse.

Home and away, Kent State Stark provides students the keys to drive their collegiate journey and make it their own. That’s thanks to a world-class education right in Stark County. 
 
“There are so many opportunities Kent State Stark provides,” Lepley said. “I cannot wait to get started this fall.”

Lepley, who was awarded the university’s Hometown Flash award at the 2019 Best of Stark Preps, is used to juggling rigorous academics; earning college credits while still in high school through the College Credit Plus (CCP) program. 

She was one of the numerous area students taking part in the popular program. This fall, the CCP program at Kent State Stark will enroll more than 900 students – with upward of 600 taking approved courses at their local high schools; nearly 300 will take classes on the Stark Campus.

At 18, Lepley is both an example of ingenuity and perseverance, overcoming an injury – a calcifying bone bruise – to lead the Marlington Dukes during her senior year.

“Experiencing an injury and recovering from that has really inspired me to become a nurse,” she said. “I’d like to go into the orthopedic field and help people get better and be their best selves.”

TRANSFORMATIONAL POWER

For more than 70 years, that has been the goal of Kent State Stark – Your Hometown University – providing the community with the education necessary to meet their dreams head-on. 

“We work to change lives through the education we provide. After all, we are Kent State University,” said Dean Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D. “We are part of a large research institution with world-class faculty and state-of-the-art facilities. We provide the immeasurable value of an affordable, quality education where students can earn a Kent State degree at a fraction of the cost.”

From its humble beginnings in the basement of McKinley High School to a campus with 200 beautiful acres and seven buildings in Jackson Township, Kent State Stark remains deeply committed to all who work, live, learn and play here. 

The transformational power of Kent State has its most significant impact on its students, who can earn a Kent State degree in Stark County.

And the power of a Kent State University degree cannot be denied. Just ask any of the more than 17,000 Kent State alumni who live in Stark County what their degree has meant to them personally and professionally. 
 
For Lepley, she’s looking forward to earning a Kent State degree while staying home with mom and dad, Brian and Darleen Lepley. As the youngest of three children, she said she knows an advantage when she sees it.

“Kent State Stark gives local students an edge,” Lepley said. “It’s very nice to go to college and still get to stay at home. It really helps that it’s just minutes away and the cost is just so affordable.”

This basketball standout said it’s more than a home-court advantage; it is her hometown advantage.
 

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Kent State Stark students discuss their trip to Rwanda with the community at Global Gateway Day.

Stained red from the earthy ground, their palms were open wide to meet the day. Rwanda Red Hands

Painted with a shared collective experience, their homeland distance of 7,489 miles, barriers of language and culture faded away in the moment.

There was only this.

The house that they helped build.

From one hand to the other, the students worked together to pass mounds of red mud and clay that would become the home of a woman widowed during the Rwandan genocide. Brick by brick, the hut was pieced together in part by the Kent State University at Stark students, who made the trek and made the difference. They worked alongside local community members, police and military to take part in the monthly service project, known as “Umuganda.” 

For the 13 who crossed the Atlantic, they left home to find themselves. Now, the students speak out with one voice, sharing their experiences with friends and family, the campus and the community at events, such as the recent Global Gateway Day.

‘RWANDA TO THE WORLD’

Professor Leslie Heaphy’s class on the history of genocide provided structure for the weeklong trip over spring break. 

“As a historian, I was drawn to the events of 25 years ago but, more importantly in many ways is what Rwanda has done since then, the reconciliation and the recovery,” she said. “There is so much the world could learn from Rwanda if we would just open up.”

For Isabelle Cullen, the short-term study abroad trip marked her first time traveling outside of the country. Rwanda house buidling

“This is unprecedented territory for not only me, but for Kent State, which hasn’t really seen a trip like this,” said Cullen, a freshman nursing student. “I mean, it’s all the way to Africa.” 

And, that, is exactly the point.

Just ask Pacifique Niyonzima, who was orphaned at the age of 3 in 1994, when between 800,000 and 1 million Tutsi Rwandans were killed by their Hutu neighbors. Nearly 70 percent of the Tutsi population was murdered in the genocide.

After the massacre, the country Niyonzima was born into was gone. “Families were torn apart. There was no education, no economy. Nothing,” he said. “The government truly had to rebuild the country from scratch. I still don’t understand why that happened… why the world let that happen.”

Niyonzima, now a graduate student at Kent State studying higher education administration, dreamed of making the journey to his home country a reality. 

“The solution is education and that is why we are doing this. I’ve always believed that I could use my education to make a difference,” he said. “I believe an education is not just about investing in myself, it is about investing in other people. That’s why I have sought to do this trip. 

“When we learn from each other, we are truly changed. For me, it’s about bringing the world to Rwanda and Rwanda to the world.”

FEAR NO MORE

The trip seemed like a longshot until Niyonzima connected with two members of the Stark Campus – Heaphy and Sarah Schmidt, assistant director of Global Education.

Heaphy designed her course around the trip. Niyonzima arranged class activities in Rwanda, lodging and transportation. The students also traveled to Washington, D.C., upon arrival home to participate in a ceremony recognizing the 25th anniversary of the genocide.

“The timing of this trip was perfect,” Schmidt said. “For me, this is what global education is all about – a beautiful, cross-cultural engagement founded upon empathizing with other people, humanizing each other and finding those shared commonalities. These 13 students were immersed into a completely foreign environment but walked away with a fuller understanding of what it means to be human.” Rwanda kids

While their eyes were opened to the horrors of history, the students also witnessed firsthand the loving unity and sense of community that is present-day Rwanda. 

“We were welcomed with open arms, and honestly, at first we weren’t sure what to expect,” acknowledged Landon Ellis, a sophomore studying criminal justice. “When I told my friends and family about the trip, they said, ‘You know that’s Africa, right? That’s a very dangerous place.’ 

“We overcame stereotypes and fear and have arrived home to educate our families, friends and the community about the kindness of a nation.”

Recent graduate Marissa Hoover said the United States could learn a lot from Rwanda. 

“You go to Rwanda, a region that has been completely torn apart, and yet they all can agree on one thing: they are all Rwandan, they are all human and, at the base level, they can figure out their issues and build again,” she said. 

All students agreed the trip was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity; an experience marked by shared goals of peace. 

First greeted with the Rwandan word that means “outsider,” by the end of the trip the students were a part of the inner circle, standing hand in hand. Now, they were called “friend.” 

“What brings me hope is to see how the people of Rwanda have come together,” Niyonzima said. “How we can all come together as one people, one humanity and one united world.”


 

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

As the business world continues to grow more dynamic and complex, so does the role of the human-resource professional.

In response to this challenge, the Corporate University at Kent State University at Stark will hold the 2019 Human Resource Symposium on Thursday, July 18, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Conference Center, 6000 Frank Ave. NW.

Designed for HR professionals, attendees will learn about the latest research on emerging trends and best solutions for dealing with workplace concerns.  

“Participants will take away useful tools to put into practice and make valuable new connections,” said Faith Sheaffer-Polen, director of the Corporate University. “The symposium is focused on how to prepare yourself and your workforce for the future. We are bringing in presenters from multiple disciplines who have real-world experience and are experts in their field.”  

Professionals with expertise in current workplace topics will lead sessions, which include: 

  • Identifying strategies to overcome the five dysfunctions of a team, based on the classic New York Times bestseller.
  • Talent management: How to grow great employees through the creation of development plans.
  • Interviewing like a pro and learning how to assess experience and skills accurately.
  • Diversity awareness and the power of inclusion – identifying barriers to interacting effectively with others.
  • How mindset affects beliefs, performance and results.
  • Developing your professional HR strategy and more.

To register contact Mona Zink at 330-244-3508.

For more details, visit www.kent.edu/stark/cucc/human-resource-symposium. Registration fee is $195. Attendees will receive five HRCI HR General credits and five SHRM Professional Development credits.  

Friday, May 24, 2019

Deepraj Mukherjee and John Frank honored with teaching awards.

Above photo: Dr. Deepraj Mukherjee (center) pictured with Faculty Chair Lucas Engelhardt (left) and Dean Denise Seachrist (right).

 
Deepraj Mukherjee grew up in Kolkata, India, traveling to the U.S. to study economics. But, his No. 1 goal has always been to make a difference.

In the classroom, this associate professor of economics challenges his students to find the answers that will better their homes, neighborhoods and communities. He encourages them to think about how economics influences everyday life. 

And it’s clear that Mukherjee, who was recently awarded the 2019 Distinguished Teaching Award, is making an impact.

“Dr. Mukherjee has been one of the best – if not the best – professors that I have had at any of the Kent campuses,” said one student in his nomination of Mukherjee for the teaching award.

“He is an extremely knowledgeable professor in his field. He is great at relaying information to his students in a way that we can comprehend, and he is a fun and caring professor. The combination of all three of these attributes is what makes Dr. Mukherjee stand out.”

Since Mukherjee joined the faculty at Kent State University at Stark in 2012, he said he has been impressed with the educational quality and research opportunities available to students.

“The fact that undergraduate students can be exposed to high-quality research gives them the perfect way to obtain the highest quality education,” he said, “because, at the end of the day, it really is that experience you are getting in the field.” 

Mukherjee and finalists for the Distinguished Teaching Award were recognized during the Kent State Stark Spring 2019 Commencement Ceremony, held May 12 at Umstattd Performing Arts Hall in Canton. Finalists were: Greg Smith, Ph.D., assistant professor of biological sciences, and Erin Vaughn, M.A., lecturer of music.

John Frank
John Frank (center) pictured with Faculty Chair Lucas Engelhardt (left) and Dean Denise Seachrist (right).

'ABOVE AND BEYOND'

John Frank, who teaches finance courses at Kent State Stark, received the Award of Distinction, presented to adjunct faculty.

A longtime instructor at the campus, Frank has served as an adjunct for nearly 20 years. His name has become synonymous with one course that he has taught every semester since 2001: Legal Environment of Business.

The course teaches business administration majors about the legal issues that students could encounter in their business careers, as well as in their personal lives.  

“Since I took this course as an undergraduate student at The Ohio State University in 1987, I have been intrigued and fascinated by the law,” he said. “I hope and try to present the course material in a manner that will cause our students to experience the same intrigue and fascination with the law.”

Frank’s students attest to that goal. 

“Professor John Frank has wowed me with everything about his course. He is an attorney and clearly knows what material he is teaching. He gives great real-world examples, while being an honest and straightforward professor,” said one student in her nomination of Frank. “Everything he does in his class is in the best interest of the student, and he offers incredible insight to any question that is asked. He goes above and beyond to do everything in his power to help us succeed.”

For Frank, receiving the Award of Distinction has made him feel grateful and encouraged. 

“I am grateful for the kindness and thoughtfulness that prompted a student to nominate me,” he said. “I am encouraged as I hope to work with many more Kent State Stark students, and I am privileged to participate in their college journey.”


Learn more about the Distinguished Teaching Award and Award of Distinction.

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Nationally syndicated columnist Charita Goshay offers the spring class words of wisdom.

The Stark Campus alumni family welcomed its newest members Sunday, May 12, during the annual spring commencement ceremony at Umstattd Performing Arts Hall. 

More than 100 graduates participated in the event, celebrating their pinnacle academic achievement. 

“Now is the time to excel personally and build upon the academic success you have achieved at Your Hometown University,” said Denise A. Seachrist, Ph.D., dean and chief administrative officer. “You will always have a home at Kent State Stark.” 

In total, Kent State University at Stark conferred 408 degrees, consisting of master’s, bachelor’s and associate degrees. 

View ceremony photos      View graduate photos

Repository staff writer and GateHouse Media nationally syndicated columnist Charita M. Goshay served as the commencement speaker. Goshay, a Kent State University alumna and award-winning journalist, also is a founding board member of Habitat for Humanity (East Central Ohio) and a graduate of Leadership Stark County. 

Below is Goshay’s speech in its entirety: 

So, what can I tell you today, that you don’t already know?

Think outside the box? Just say no?

Somewhere along the way, you got it; you figured it out. You assessed your options and came to the conclusion that education is the game-changer. You understand that education is, as Malcolm X once put it, “A passport to the future.”

I know that some of you put on your funny hat on this morning, looked in the mirror and marveled at the sight. 

Don’t let anyone kid you. What you’ve managed to accomplish is a very, very big deal.

So, I’m not here today to offer you some magical plan on what you should do now. 

I’ve come to praise you.

Because, if there’s one thing I’ve learned from 29 years in journalism, it’s that everyone has a story.

We’ve never met, but I know that there are some former foster kids sitting among you. 

I know some of you were fed a steady diet of doubt and cynicism as children and were told – more than once – that you’d never be anything.

I know that a few of you are here as part of a plan to rebuild your lives, to change a trajectory that was headed toward nowhere.
 
Others of you are here to finish what you started, and to set an example for your children.

I know some of you are here against insurmountable odds, overcoming situations that would have crushed the rest of us mere mortals. There are capes underneath those robes, I just know it.

I can’t advise you on how to live out the rest of your life… The dirty little secret of adulthood is that none of us really knows what we’re doing.

But I will encourage you. 

I want to encourage you to stay curious.

I know that maybe right now, the last thing you want to do is pick up a book, but reading is the closest thing we adults have to magic.

I encourage you to travel when you can. Cross paths with different people, races, languages and cultures. You will find that we are not as different as you think, and that kindness abounds.

I encourage you to do something every once in a while that scares you to death – like giving a commencement speech.

I encourage you to freak out your family by doing something unexpected, maybe even insane. Run for president.

I encourage you to consider public service. Despite all you may read and hear, public service remains a noble calling. 

Always keep in mind that a “government by the people” can only be as good as the people running it.

We need young men and women who still believe in this grand experiment; who still hold enough faith in this country to serve it.

In the book of Proverbs, it is written that a person’s talents makes room for them. I encourage you to take your talents, take what you’ve learned at Kent State and apply it in making our world a more fair and just place.

Though it may set you at odds with those you know and love, I encourage you to continue to embrace your authentic self. If you do so, I promise you, you will find your tribe.

I encourage you to find ways – no matter how small – to get and stay engaged in your community, in order to make it better. There’s enough ambivalence in the world.  

Look, I know some of you have a U-Haul trailer hitched on the back of your car, which is idling in the parking lot, and it’s aimed at Florida, or New York City or Chicago.

I get it. But I would encourage you to consider remaining here in Stark County. We need you.

Stark is growing smaller, older and poorer, and we need your youth, your vision, your talent and your potential.

We need your energy, your ideas for new businesses, technologies and services not yet in existence. 

Before Steve Jobs was Steve Jobs, he was just another college dropout, building a company in a garage.

Why not you? Why not here?

We’re no pikers. Ohio has produced eight American presidents. It also has produced such people as Thomas Edison, John Glenn, Victoria Woodhull, Steven Spielberg, Jesse Owens, and now, you.

I want to praise you for not listening when you were told “Well, you know college isn’t for everyone.” While that may be true, it clearly wasn’t true in your case…

I praise you for your persistence.

It is said that at the end of the day, it isn’t intellect, or talent, or even sheer dumb luck that separates the successful from the others; it’s persistence.

Now, I know we’re living in an era when we’re supposed to tell our children that they’re special. Allow me to burst your bubble. You are not. But what you are is someone who’s come to understand that we all are responsible for making the most of whatever opportunities we have been given.

There are so many truly extraordinary and gifted people in the world who will never have the chance to wear a cap and gown, but it doesn’t make them any less valuable.

Imagine how much better off we all would be were they, too, were given the opportunity to contribute.

Currently, the United Nations reports that 263 million children and young adults are not enrolled in school of any kind. According to Global Citizen, a child whose mother can read, is 50 percent more likely to live beyond age 5. If every mother on the planet had a basic education, there would be 1.7 million fewer children suffering from malnutrition.

Education is that impactful.

I praise you for answering that call from deep in your heart to go farther, to do better; for your willingness to embark upon the harder, less-traveled path that will pay off for you in ways you cannot yet fathom.

I praise you for watering your own souls.


 

Saving Lives in Alaska
Wednesday, May 08, 2019

Nursing program alumnus is a flight nurse in The Last Frontier.

The wide open spaces of a rugged Alaskan landscape are much different from the manicured lawns that blanket the housing developments of suburban Green, where Joel Hukill grew up. 

Today, he’s no stranger to the mountains, remote villages and severe weather that can whip across The Last Frontier. There, this 28-year-old stares down the impossible as he battles the conditions to save lives.

Hukill is a flight nurse for Guardian Flight Alaska. He is living out a dream he didn’t realize he’d had. Now, he has no doubts that he’s found his calling.

“Choosing this profession is the best decision that I have ever made,” said the 2014 graduate of the nursing program at Kent State University at Stark. “Nursing has so much to offer; it is truly a career in which you can transition from the NICU to end-of-life care and everything in between. We change lives every day.”

Hukill congratulates the nurses graduating as part of the 2019 class. To the recent grads, Hukill said, “The nursing program at Kent State Stark will serve you well. My professors, who I now call mentors, have helped me every step of the way.”

He credits Professor Chrissy Kauth, R.N., Ph.D., with inspiring his “can do” attitude and drive to help people every day. “I am just so proud of everything that Joel has accomplished,” said Kauth.

ROAD LESS TRAVELED

Adventure calls Hukill’s name, but that wasn’t always the case. In fact, the 2009 Green High School graduate was happy with choosing a university close to home and thought he’d stay in this region.

Entering college during The Great Recession, Hukill’s thinking was practical: where are the jobs? The answer was health care. 

“Kent State Stark’s nursing program was challenging in ways that bettered my future as a nurse,” he said. “At one point, I doubted whether I would make it through to graduation, but my professors encouraged me to keep moving forward. I’m so glad that I did.”

Hukill began his career working at a Massillon-area hospital as a technician, quickly moving on to the Emergency Department after passing his boards. He aspired to work at Metro Health in Cleveland, a Level 1 trauma hospital. There, he decided he wanted to become a flight nurse. 

“They have a certain way about them, and I knew that this is what I wanted to do,” he said. “This, to me, is the highest level you can achieve as a nurse, and I knew that’s what I wanted to do.”

But how to get there?

Hukill set a goal and strategized his next steps. He became a travel nurse, moving across the country, deployed to hospitals with the greatest need. Hukill seized the opportunity to grow his skills and delve into specialities, such as cardiovascular intensive care. He also fell in love… with the Pacific Northwest. 

Last year, Hukill landed a full-time position with Guardian Flight Alaska, the largest air medical ambulance in Alaska. The company uses different types of aircraft, ranging from helicopters to a Learjet, enabling the team to reach remote villages or quickly transport patients to hospitals across the United States. Most frequently, patients are transported to Anchorage or Seattle.

“You never really know what you are going to encounter,” Hukill said. “It is The Last Frontier and truly an amazing place. There is certainly a lack of resources, and in some cases, there are no roads to reach remote villages.”

His shifts are in two-week stints, working two and then off for two. The company provides housing in Juneau.

PROMISES KEPT

Would he do it again? 

“Choosing to become a nurse was the best decision that I’ve ever made,” Hukill said. “For all of the future nurses, I have to say when it gets tough -- and, it will -- remember what you are there for. You may get frustrated, but remember the bottom line is that you are here to help people. That’s what you are really there for in the end.”

Hukill said he holds tight to Professor Kauth’s words, “when you sign up to become a nurse, you take an oath.”

An oath to help. Anytime. Anywhere. 

Maybe even in The Last Frontier.
 

Learn more about Kent State Stark's nursing program.
 

Friday, April 12, 2019

Kent State University at Stark commemorates Earth Day 2019 with a free, family friendly celebration.

Expect chilly temperatures but plentiful sunshine. The Earth Day Celebration takes place rain or shine.

Nearly two dozen new exhibitors highlight this year’s event, including an Akron Zoo animal presentation, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens, Stark County Beekeepers Association and Ernie’s Bike Shop, among many others. 

Set to inspire environmental responsibility and to improve the appreciation for our planet’s natural resources, Kent State Stark’s Earth Day Celebration will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, April 28, at the Campus Center lot and the Pond and Wetlands Research Area.

Attendees will enjoy an afternoon filled with educational activities, entertainment and interactive demonstrations for all ages. 

Kent State Stark has partnered with the following sponsors to present Earth Day 2019: The Repository, The Print Shop of Canton, Inc., The Brewer-Garrett Company, Cain Toyota, Inc., and Cookery Food Truck of Wadsworth.

The event, in its 11th year, also will include family favorites, such as a nature walk led by Biology Professor Robert Hamilton, a children’s area with face painting, mock fossil digs, crafts, a coloring contest, photo opportunities and much more. 

Again this year, Kent State Stark will be honored with Tree Campus USA® recognition by the Arbor Day Foundation for promoting healthy trees and engaging students and staff in the spirit of conservation.

For more information on Kent State Stark’s Earth Day Celebration, a campus map and a complete list of participants, visit www.kent.edu/stark/earth-day-celebration. To enter the coloring contest for a chance to win a prize, please print the scene from the event web page, and bring completed artwork to the event. Winners will be selected and contacted during the week following Earth Day.
 

Friday, April 12, 2019

Note: The Sunday, April 21 performance has been canceled.

Student-led production is the first of its kind in the newly renovated and expanded Fine Arts Building.

Kent State University at Stark Theatre’s first student-led production opens April 12 with the performance “Of Mice and Men”, a play based on the novella by John Steinbeck. 

The “Of Mice and Men” cast will take to the campus’ stage for opening night at 7:30 p.m. April 12 in the Studio Theatre, which is located in the newly expanded and renovated Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. 

Directed by Kent State Stark student Morgan Brown, “Of Mice and Men” depicts the lives of two drifters during the Great Depression who have just arrived at a ranch to work for enough money to buy their own place.  

Brown, a senior theatre major, is a 2016 graduate of GlenOak High School. She said she chose the Steinbeck classic to direct because “it is an extremely emotional and poignant show.

“Our new Studio Theatre is the perfect place for an intimate, thought-provoking show because the audience is situated quite close to the actors. I wanted a show where, as soon as an audience member steps into the theatre, they are transported into the world of the play,” Brown said. “When audience members are fully engulfed in the performance, Steinbeck’s themes of human emotion and morals are represented beautifully.”

Brown said the Kent State Stark Theatre community has become like family throughout her time on campus. 

“When the opportunity for a student-led production arose, I jumped at the chance to direct,” said the 20-year-old. “I felt that there was no better way to begin than with my closest friends and valued professors. This process has given me such faith in the art of theatre, and I can speak for everyone involved when I say that we have put forth our best effort for this show.”

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. tonight and Saturday, and at 2 p.m. Sunday. The show also will take place at 7:30 p.m. April 19 and 20. The Sunday, April 21 matinee at 2 p.m. has been canceled.

Tickets for the show can be purchased online at www.kent.edu/stark/of-mice-and-men, by phone at 330-244-3348 or in person at the box office in the Fine Arts lobby. Will call opens one hour prior to performances. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for senior citizens and non-KSU students. Tickets are free to all Kent State students with student IDs.
 

Thursday, April 11, 2019

Popular lecture sold out, no tickets remain.

Bestselling novelist Nicholas Sparks, the final speaker of the 2018-19 Featured Speakers Series, will speak at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 17. Now in its 28th year, the Featured Speakers Series is free and open to the public. All tickets for the evening's lecture have been distributed.

Before Sparks was a world-famous writer, he worked a variety of jobs, including real estate appraisal, waiting tables, selling dental products by phone, and starting his own small manufacturing business, which struggled from the beginning.
 
In 1994, at the age of 28, he wrote “The Notebook” over a period of six months, and in October 1995, Warner Books bought the rights. Now, with more than 105 million copies of his books sold worldwide, literary sensation Sparks is the author of 19 New York Times No. 1 bestselling books and is a cultural phenomenon in his own right.
 
Sparks’ program will be held in Timken Great Hall at the Kent State University at Stark Conference Center. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. Following the lecture, there will NOT be a book signing or a meet and greet.

For more information, visit www.kent.edu/stark/featured-speakers-series.

Monday, April 01, 2019

Professor Carrie Schweitzer has discovered hundreds of new species. Now, this research standout is leading students in a new degree program. 

Carrie Schweitzer has always been interested in the things of Earth. The stuff that lies just below the surface of land and sea. 

This professor of geology is no stranger to discovering a new species (or several hundred!). Now, the research standout is leading a new degree program at Kent State University at Stark.

The Bachelor of Arts in Geology is soon to become one of the more than 20 baccalaureate degrees that students can earn without leaving the Stark Campus. Kent State Stark students also have the opportunity to begin coursework in nearly 300 Kent State University degree programs.

“Geology is a field of study that doesn’t always occur to students because it is not taught in high schools,” said Schweitzer, Ph.D., who has taught the subject at the collegiate level for 20 years. “But, it is such an important field of study because it not only connects us to the past; it helps us predict what could happen with Earth in the future.”

Geologists, for example, can help determine how environmental issues, such as erosion, or certain practices, such as hydraulic fracturing, affect ground and water systems. 

HIDDEN TREASURES

Growing up in the small village of Mantua, Schweitzer was inspired by her mother, an elementary school teacher, who fostered her interest in teaching. “Both of my parents liked the outdoors, which also probably influenced my life choices,” Schweitzer said.

Over the past 20 years, she has discovered and named more than 200 new species of decapods, an order of crustaceans that includes crayfish, crabs, lobsters, prawns and shrimp.

She has been recognized for her contributions to the field and is a fellow of the Paleontological Society, an international organization devoted to the promotion of paleontology. 

Always up for adventure, Schweitzer enjoys the outdoors and, of course, hiking and traveling to discover her many finds in North America, the Caribbean, Argentina, Chile, New Zealand, Asia and Eastern Europe.

Just as the leaves were turning hues of red and gold last year, Schweitzer and her Kent State Stark students went rock hunting. They lined their treasures in their specialized lab, located in the campus’ state-of-the-art Science and Nursing Building. The $17 million facility features contemporary labs that allow students to gain experiential learning through collaborative research with faculty.

One find that Johnathan Risden, a sophomore geology major, is particularly proud of is the discovery of the fossil of an extinct coral. 

“I want to be a paleontologist one day,” said the 20-year-old from Coventry. “I want to understand what it was like here before us. Why are we here? Where did we come from? These are always questions that I’m seeking to answer.”

His professor shares that sense of wonder. “I like naming new species, documenting how they’ve changed, how each has evolved and why they are now extinct,” Schweitzer said.

“Every find is a hidden treasure that tells us a little more about the Earth’s story, which is our story to tell.”
 

Monday, April 01, 2019

Dynamic duo.

Jasmine Long and Sharon Ware grew up in different neighborhoods, but their connection transcends residential blocks. Broken barriers now build the dreams to change their communities for the better. 

Long hailed from the southeast side of Canton; Ware called Massillon home. But, the obstacles to accessible health care were the same. Today, they are medical students ready to change it.

“Growing up, I watched as family members struggled daily with untreated health issues,” Long said. “Life could have been so much better for them, had they had access to the care they needed.”

As a child, Long loved studying anatomy. Her favorite “The Magic School Bus” episode explored inside the human body. But discouragement surrounded this girl growing up in the southeast side where she was told medical doctors didn’t come. 

“Find something more realistic,” they said. 

What was real at the time was the wrong crowd, which she fell into. 

But Long was drawn back to the science books that first sparked her desire to learn. Anatomy and physiology textbooks were her page-turners and, one day, the right encouragement came. 

What seemed like the impossible suddenly wasn’t. “I’m where I am today because of God’s grace,” she said. 

In 2015, Long graduated from Kent State University with a bachelor’s degree in public health. She credits her undergraduate professors, Kent State Stark faculty among them, with encouraging her to become Jasmine Long, D.O.

Now, this mother of three spends her weeks studying medicine at the Cleveland Campus of Ohio University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. It is where this Kent State alumna met Ware, a fellow alumna.

The two have forged a fast friendship, and while studying different programs, the end goal is the same. 

Ware, a single mom, said the idea of being a physician “wouldn’t leave my heart.” After graduation from Kent State Stark in 2008, she went on to earn a master’s degree in biological sciences from Rutgers University in 2011.

“My biggest inspiration in pursuing medical school is my daughter,” Ware said. “She is so proud of me, and I’m grateful to tell her that if you have a goal – no matter what it is – you can achieve it. I hope that when she grows up she realizes that she can change the world.”

Zianna is 5 and tells her friends that her mommy is studying to become a doctor. Ware’s fiancé, Leon Canty, and her parents, including mother Irene, also are a huge support as Ware pursues her medical degree. 

Her program, Transformative Care Continuum (TCC), is unique to Ohio University’s Cleveland Campus, and when she completes it, she’ll have a residency waiting for her at Cleveland Clinic Akron General. 

She plans to take her skills home to Massillon one day. “I’m humbled at the idea of being able to treat my community,” Ware said. “I want to empower them to embrace life to the fullest possible in their level of health.” 

Long credits her husband, Ross, for being her biggest supporter. He takes care of their three girls, 3-year-old Auni; 5-year-old Auné; and Ruby, who is 15. “I know that I am carrying out my life purpose to make a difference,” she said. “My husband and my children know they are called to be a part of the journey.” 

Long is currently completing her first year of medical school and plans to tackle her rotations at Cleveland Clinic Akron General. Eventually though, she’d like to open a clinic in her southeast Canton neighborhood. 

“Coming from where I am from, big dreams are really important,” Long said. “I am a dreamer.” 

And doer.
 

Monday, April 01, 2019

Worth it.

Theno “Kristo” Pantelides grew up in the hilly city of San Francisco, surrounded by ocean. A coastline not unlike the home of his father, where houses dot the shores of thousands of islands in a country influential in ancient times.

Pantelides’ first words were Greek and he looked to his papáki̱s, Konstantine, for guidance at an early age. “Nothing worth doing is ever easy,” the senior Pantelides would often tell his son, a miracle baby right from the start.

The family moved to Canton when Pantelides was 5 because his father wanted to be closer to the community where his family immigrated. Today, he works as a dentist in Alliance, treating the underinsured. 

“My father had a realization, ‘I have to give back to the society that gave my family a home and a chance,’” Pantelides said. “He was so grateful for the opportunity to have this life in America.”

But it wasn’t without difficulties. Arriving in the United States speaking no English, his father was made fun of in school. He didn’t want that for his son.

“I was homeschooled,” Pantelides said. “I learned so much, but missed out on extracurriculars and ‘top of the class’ accolades. When I was thinking about how I was going to structure my life after school, I didn’t think I was cut out for college.”

Then, he found Kent State University at Stark. 

As Stark County’s only public university, Kent State Stark is open enrollment, providing all residents the opportunity to obtain a university education.

“Everyone has a chance, and I can never truly repay the openness that Kent State Stark has shown me,” he said. “To give me that opportunity to prove myself when I believed I couldn’t, this university showed me that I could.”

This 23-year-old has worked hard to meet the demands of university study, while juggling part-time employment. 

As a student tutor in the Academic Success Center, Pantelides found a way to follow his father’s example.

“I’ve tried to give back and repay the help that I’ve received from so many,” he said. “I’m not at the tutoring center because I immediately succeeded, it is because I struggled and I overcame.”

Now, this double major in business management and marketing is set to graduate, but not before he sees the home of his ancestors. This summer, Pantelides will study abroad in Greece.

From one milestone to the next. But the road wasn’t always easy, as Pantelides knows nothing worth doing ever is. 

Monday, April 01, 2019

Guided by purpose.

Schooldays end with a “welcome home” at Tiqvah Hands of Hope, an after-school mentoring program for students who live in the city of Canton.

A simple phrase graces the threshold of the doors they enter every day:

“You can change the world.”

Waiting on the other side is Ariel Deck. A member of the Tiqvah team, this Kent State University at Stark senior is one of the first faces the children see. They greet “Miss Ariel” with a hug as they climb onto her lap. 

It is not uncommon to see their tiny hands combing through her long, blonde hair. Tiqvah provides a retreat from a homelife where affection isn’t always gained and trauma peeks around each corner.

Working with the children in the Tiqvah program has provided Deck, a human development and family studies (HDFS) major, with a unique experiential learning opportunity.

“It is one of my absolute favorite things,” said Deck. “Because Kent State Stark is close to home, it has given me the chance to pursue employment that makes a real difference, right here in my community.”

For this 2012 GlenOak High School graduate, a typical day begins with an 8 a.m. class at Kent State Stark, followed by a visit to Canton City Schools to observe her Tiqvah third-graders in the classroom. After school, she works at the Tiqvah facility in downtown Canton until 9 most evenings. 

Deck also fills her weeks with a practicum at Akron Children’s Hospital, where she focuses on social and emotional health studies. In her role, she travels with the hospital’s trauma trainer to regional school districts to instruct teachers on new classroom techniques, including triggers, warning signs and coping strategies for students. 

“You can say something over and over, but when a child is worried about where their next meal is coming from, they will not be able to focus on the lesson,” Deck said. “A lot of these children, by the age of 9 years old, have worried about so much; they’ve seen more than I ever will.”

Deck credits Kent State Stark faculty, specifically Lisa Hallaman, associate lecturer of human development, with encouraging her to face difficult situations head-on. 

At Tiqvah, Deck has dinner with her students who receive a hot meal before they are transported home in the evenings. They get homework help and do the basics, like brush their teeth. 

“We spend so much time with these children, we get to know their teachers, their families,” she said. “We get to be a part of their entire lives.”

For Deck, that opportunity lights the way to purpose. 

“I definitely can say that I’ve found my purpose while attending Kent State Stark,” she said. “And that is to help children and families who have experienced trauma in their lives.”

Rising to meet each moment, Deck is setting out to change the world.

She ends her long days with a hug and a “see you tomorrow,” when she’ll greet the children again at the place where hands are held, hair is left messy and the lines blur between educator and friend. 

The place that was named for happy endings: Tiqvah. 

The place that bears the Hebrew name for hope.


Learn more about Tiqvah Hands of Hope by visiting www.tiqvah.org.
 

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Summary report provided as community service to help businesses make data-driven decisions.

A lack of skilled labor is one of the top hiring challenges that businesses in Stark and Wayne counties face, according to the results of a wage and benefits survey conducted by the Corporate University at Kent State University at Stark.

More than 120 area companies completed the online survey, which was conducted in 2018. The summary report released by the Corporate University is being provided as a community service to area businesses to help officials make data-driven decisions regarding wage and benefits packages.

“We believe this report will provide useful information, such as vacation and sick time offered by area businesses, the percentage of health benefits paid by employees, and most importantly local wage data,” said Marshall Hill, Corporate University outreach program coordinator and author of the survey.

Claudia Gomez, Ph.D., assistant professor of management and information systems at Kent State Stark, said some of the most notable data refer to hiring challenges that area businesses face.

“Seventy-two percent of the respondents reported having challenges hiring employees, while 37 percent stated that this is due to difficulty finding candidates with the desired skills or qualifications,” said Gomez, who teaches courses in organizational behavior, leadership and human resource management. “This suggests that the labor market is not meeting the needs of the businesses surveyed.

“From an economic development perspective, this is of concern since part of what allows for economic development is the human capital available in a region. If companies considering locating to the region assess that there is not enough human capital for a successful operation, they might decide to go elsewhere.”

Gomez also notes the data reflect opportunities for continued partnerships between the business community and Stark County’s institutions of higher education through initiatives, such as Strengthening Stark. 

The survey also reveals insights about workplace perks that are strongly considered by Generation Z when entering the workforce. Only 34 percent of respondents offer remote work or work-from-home opportunities. “This can deter the youngest educated generation entering the workplace from locating here and staying in the region,” Gomez said.

View Full SUMMARY Report

For further questions regarding the data in this report, please contact the Corporate University at 330-244-3530 or Melissa Griffy Seeton, public relations and media communications coordinator, for interview requests at 330-244-3262 or mseeton@kent.edu.  

 

Friday, March 01, 2019

Comedic musical at Kent State Stark is the second production of the 2018-19 academic year.

Kent State University at Stark Theatre will hold its second theatrical production of the 2018-19 season, “The 25th annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”, a musical comedy by playwrights William Finn, Rachel Sheinkin and Rebecca Feldman. 

The cast of “The 25th annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” will take to the campus’ stage for opening night at 7:30 p.m. tonight in The Mary J. Timken Theatre, which is located in the newly expanded and renovated Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW.

Directed by Kent State Stark Theatre Director Jim Weaver, “Putnam County” is a musical about an eclectic group of six tweens vying for the spelling championship of a lifetime.

While candidly disclosing hilarious and touching stories from their home lives, the students spell their way through a series of (potentially made-up) words, hoping never to hear the soul-crushing, pout-inducing, life un-affirming “ding” of the bell that signals a spelling mistake.

Six spellers enter; one speller leaves! At least the losers get a juice box.

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. tonight and Saturday, and at 2 p.m. Sunday. The show also will take place at 7:30 p.m. March 8 and 9, and at 2 p.m. March 10.

Tickets for the show can be purchased online at www.kent.edu/stark/25th-annual-putnam-county-spelling-bee, by phone at 330-244-3348 or in person at the box office in the Fine Arts lobby. Will call opens one hour prior to performances. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for senior citizens and non-KSU students. Tickets are free to all Kent State students with student IDs.   

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

When Cory Maxwell was considering what college to attend, knowing that the institution is military friendly was very important to him. For him and student veterans, the Military Friendly® School designation helps determine the best schools that will embrace them and ensure their success on campus.

“The designation was a positive factor in me returning back to Kent State University,” said Mr. Maxwell, a senior finance major who currently serves in the U.S. Navy Reserve. “I have greater confidence in the university knowing that I have a supporting cast of staff here to support and help me whenever I needed them, which made my transition back to student life easier.”   

For the 10th consecutive time, Kent State has earned the 2019-2020 Military Friendly School designation for its Kent Campus. Military Friendly is the military ratings division of VIQTORY Media, a service-disabled, veteran-owned business that also publishes G.I. Jobs and Military Spouse. Military Friendly rates companies and colleges on their programs to recruit and retain military veterans as employees and students. 

In addition to the Kent Campus, the university’s Stark, Trumbull and Salem campuses have received the 2019-2020 Military Friendly School designation.

Recognized by Military Friendly as “the best of the best” in the small public schools category, Kent State University at Salem has earned the elite Military Friendly Top 10 School Award and the gold-level distinction. Kent State Salem ranks No. 7 among small public institutions.

The Military Friendly School designation recognizes Kent State for exhibiting leading practices in recruiting and supporting post-military students. Kent State and the other colleges and universities on the list represent the top tier of institutions that provide the best opportunities for military service members and their spouses. 
 
“The Military Friendly designation is an indication that Kent State University continues to adhere to the highest national standards when it comes to serving our military connected population,” said Joshua Rider, director of Kent State’s Center for Adult and Veteran Services. “It shows that we value them and their experiences. This is a clear reflection of the Kent State community’s continued support for our veterans, service members and their dependents.”

The list of Military Friendly Schools ratings is assessed through the evaluation of both public data about an institution and proprietary data gathered through the free Military Friendly Schools survey. The annual, data-driven Military Friendly Schools survey assessment is offered at no cost to more than 8,800 institutions nationwide. Each year, schools taking the survey are held to a higher standard than in previous years via improved methodology, criteria and weightings developed with the assistance of an independent research firm and an advisory council of independent leaders in the higher education and military recruitment community.

Final survey results and ratings are determined by combining an institution’s survey scores with the assessment of the institution’s performance in such areas as student retention, graduation, job placement, loan repayment and transfer rates for all students and, specifically, for student veterans.

EY (formerly Ernst & Young), a global leader in assurance, tax, transaction and advisory services, independently tested the validity and consistency of this year’s survey results using the scoring methodology developed by VIQTORY Media for the Military Friendly Schools list.

For more information about the Military Friendly School designation, visit http://militaryfriendly.com/schools. 

For more information about Kent State’s Center for Adult and Veteran Services, visit www.kent.edu/cavs.

For more information about Kent State Stark's Veterans Services, visit www.kent.edu/stark/veterans-services.

Monday, February 18, 2019

Concert is free and open to the public.

Val B. King, granddaughter of legendary blues artist B.B. King, will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21, at Kent State University at Stark, as part of the campus’ observance of Black History Month. 

King’s concert, “Storytelling with Val B. King”, will be presented in place of Cleveland-based electric blues ensemble, the Wallace Coleman Band, previously slated to perform that evening.

King’s soothing sound has been influenced by gospel music, blues, jazz, soul and R&B. She recently finished her self-titled debut album, which includes a tribute song to her grandfather entitled, “The Legacy Goes On”. 

King’s concert is free, open to the public, and will take place in the auditorium at Main Hall, located on the campus at 6000 Frank Ave. NW. No tickets are required. 
 

Thursday, February 14, 2019

All events are free and open to the public.

Kent State University at Stark’s observance of Black History Month will include such notables as Mary Frances Berry, Ph.D., a national civil rights activist, and granddaughter of legendary blues artist B.B. King, Val B. King.

The celebratory activities are free, open to the public, and kick off with "Storytelling with Val B. King." King will perform from 6 to 8 p.m. Feb. 21 in the auditorium at Main Hall, located on the campus at 6000 Frank Ave. NW. No tickets are required. This concert is presented in place of Cleveland-based electric blues ensemble, the Wallace Coleman Band, previously stated to perform.

King’s soothing sound has been influenced by gospel music, blues, jazz, soul and R&B. She recently finished her self-titled debut album, which includes a tribute song to her grandfather entitled, “The Legacy Goes On”. 

Berry serves as the third presenter in this year’s Featured Speakers Series lineup. She’ll speak at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 26 at the campus’ Conference Center.  

Berry, who served as chairperson of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, led the charge for equal rights and liberties for Americans over the course of four presidential administrations. In her most recent book, “History Teaches Us to Resist: How Progressive Movements Have Succeeded in Challenging Times”, Berry chronicles more than 50 years of progressive victories and the winning tactics behind them.

Now in its 28th year, the Featured Speakers Series is free and open to the public, but tickets are required and limited to two per person. 

Tickets for Berry’s presentation are now available at the Main Hall information desk and will remain available during regular business hours 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. 

Join Kent State Stark for Berry, King, and other events listed below:
 

“BLACK LIST” FILM PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION
Feb. 28

2 to 3:15 p.m.
301 Main Hall
Discussion led by Joel Carbonell, Ph.D., associate professor of political science, and Jessica Jones, lecturer of English.

 

PRESENTATION: THE BLACK EXPERIENCE IN AMERICA 
March 5
5 to 6:30 p.m.
203 Main Hall
Presented by William Casterlow, enrollment management and student services advisor.
 

PRESENTATION: HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF BLACK ENGLISH

March 12
5 to 6 p.m.
Main Hall, Conference Room 1
Presented by Brenda Smith, Ph.D., associate professor of English.
 

Friday, February 08, 2019

Cultural and historical geographer seeks to connect importance for today’s students, society

Growing up, Chris Post watched as his mom juggled her collegiate studies and motherhood, balancing everyday life with dreams of earning her Ph.D.

And while field excursions with his biologist mom are a memory of his childhood, the impact of place is something this cultural and historical geographer seeks to define today. Earning a Ph.D. of his own, Dr. Post knows that what we leave behind says a lot about where we are headed.

“I’ve always been interested in space and the idea of place and also this landscape that we build that is, in part, a result of all the things that we do,” said Dr. Post, associate professor of geography at Kent State University at Stark. “Whether it is an office building or a cemetery, or a farm, what we build means something to us. Memorial landscapes reflect the past, but they also have their own histories.”

That history is on display for the next generation. 

As a member of Kent State President Beverly J. Warren’s Advisory Committee for the 50th Commemoration of May 4, 1970, Dr. Post is happy to be a part of the upcoming remembrance connecting today’s Kent State students with events that played an important role not only in the university’s history, but also in American history.

“The 50th is producing a continued conversation about the importance of memorial spaces, the impact they have and the lessons we all can learn,” Dr. Post said. “We are constantly learning from the spaces around us, and, across the country, a lot more work has been going into how memorials educate the public in an informal way.”

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

When visiting any memorial in a public space, Dr. Post said visitors should look for what is represented in the space – and what is not.

“Memorials tell us a lot about what matters and who counts, but in doing so, it also tells us a lot about who doesn’t matter and what doesn’t count in society,” Dr. Post said.

He points to the recent removal of the Robert E. Lee Monument in New Orleans, an event his geography students have discussed in class. 

“We understand what a memorial means to people beyond the group who put the memorial up, and how different members of society perceive memorials differently,” Dr. Post said. “That’s why I think we are doing a better job of understanding our memorials in recent years.”

When Dr. Post came to Kent State in 2008, he looked forward to studying the May 4, 1970, memorial efforts.

“May 4 is something my mom and I had talked about while I was growing up, so coming here and having the opportunity to dig into that, I had to do it,” he said. “Geographers are folks who love to travel, but there is another side of us that loves to dig into the local of where we live.”

MORE TO LEARN

Two years ago, Dr. Post published the paper, “Beyond Kent State? May 4 and Commemorating Violence in Public Space” in Geoforum, a peer-reviewed academic journal of geography. Still, there is a lot to learn from the historic day.

“The events surrounding May 4, 1970, are memorialized well with the new May 4 Visitors Center and walking tour,” he said. “When we look at the violence that continues to take place in public spaces, especially against protesters, I don’t think we’ve learned enough as a society from the memorial landscape on the Kent State University campus.”

Dr. Post also said it is important for the university community to continue to learn about the role of May 4, 1970, on life today. 

“During the 50th Commemoration, students will have the opportunity to understand the importance May 4 has not only to them as Kent State students, but as American citizens,” he said. “When they graduate, whether it is from a Regional Campus or the Kent Campus, their degree is going to say Kent State University. When they go out into the world, people will ask them about that day.”

Just as Dr. Post learned early from excursions with his mother, it is what they learn from what is left behind that will prepare students for the journey ahead.

To learn more about Kent State’s plan for the 50th Commemoration of May 4, visit www.kent.edu/president/may4.
 
To learn more about the Kent State May 4 Visitors Center, visit www.kent.edu/may4visitorscenter.

Wednesday, February 06, 2019

Kent State University at Stark will host a Campus Preview for high school students and their families on Feb. 23.

Campus tours will be held from 8 to 8:30 a.m. and depart from the lobby at Main Hall, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. The program will take place from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Campus Preview will introduce prospective students to Kent State Stark’s academic programs, departments and services in an informal atmosphere to allow for questions and conversation. Attendees will meet with representatives from Kent State Stark’s Admissions, Financial Aid, Advising, Academic Support Services and Student Involvement, as well as faculty members.

Students can choose from 21 bachelor's degree programs – including the new Bachelor of Arts in Geology – offered entirely at Kent State Stark. Students also can complete coursework toward more than 300 undergraduate programs at Kent State University.

Prospective students are encouraged to submit their college application during the event when the $40 application fee will be waived.

Attendees should RSVP by Feb. 21.

REGISTER FOR CAMPUS PREVIEW

For more information, contact Kristin Wray at kwray1@kent.edu or 330-244-3289.
 

Friday, January 25, 2019

Respected activist is third speaker in 2018-19 Featured Speaker Series.

For more than four decades, Mary Frances Berry, Ph.D., has been one of the most visible and respected activists in the cause of civil rights, gender equality and social justice.

Berry is the third presenter in this year’s Featured Speakers Series lineup. She’ll speak at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 26. Now in its 28th year, the Featured Speakers Series is free and open to the public, but tickets are required and limited to two per person. 

Tickets for Berry’s presentation are available beginning at 7:30 a.m. Monday, Jan. 28, at the Main Hall information desk. Tickets will remain available, while supplies last, during regular business hours 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. 

Serving as chairperson of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, Berry led the charge for equal rights and liberties for all Americans over the course of four presidential administrations. She made history as one of the founders of the monumental Free South Africa Movement (FSAM), for which she received the Nelson Mandela award.

In her most recent book, “History Teaches Us to Resist: How Progressive Movements Have Succeeded in Challenging Times”, Berry chronicles more than 50 years of progressive victories and the winning tactics behind them. She reveals what works, what doesn’t – and how to achieve positive change in our world. 

Proceeding Berry on Feb. 26, the series will close with bestselling author Nicholas Sparks on April 17. 

Programs are held in Timken Great Hall at the Kent State University at Stark Conference Center. Doors open at 6:45 p.m.

For more information, visit www.kent.edu/stark/featured-speakers-series.
 

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Fall 2018 President's and Dean's Lists

The following students have been named to the Kent State Stark Dean’s List. Those students designated with a star (*) have been named to the Kent State University President’s List.

 

Requirements for the Dean’s List include a 3.40 grade point average or above for the fall 2018 semester and at least 12 letter-graded (A, B, etc.) credit hours completed by the end of the semester. President’s List criteria are a 4.00 grade point and at least 15 letter-graded credit hours completed by the end of the semester.

 

Akron: Hannah Armbruster, Emma Boyes, Constance Bozeman, Karen Busch, Francene Candelaria*, Dakota Cobb, Nicole Cvammen, Paul Ellis, Katie Faiola, Lianna Fertig, Brandon Foster*, Alli Francis*, Nathan Geiger, Tyler Gray*, Ross Grismer, Nick Hayden, Celeste Hicks, Kaitlyn Kitchen, Timothy McFarland, Navarre Medlock, Skylar Nicholson, Chelsea Pifer, Donovan Poole, James Schindewolf, Alexis Siss, Delilah Smart, Kathy Snider-Buchanan, Innocencia Sphapmixay, Kattiejean Tibbs, Ciarra Vaughn, Raneshia Virden, Joshua Wherley, Nathan Wodzisz.

 

Alliance: Christopher Avers, Shelby Dennis, Maria DiRuzza, Madison Frase, Courtney Griebenow, Kristen Hoffman, Candace Hull, Shaelah Lopes, Joseph Mayes, Mason Middleton*, Miranda Morian, Jessica Morton, Tyler Mull, Terri Pelger, Trey Phillips, Natasha Sallinger, Jaquiez Sampson, Lynnita Toussant, Grayson Wright.

 

Atwater: Autumn Browning*, Gregory Cain, Maylee Cannon, Haylee Hermann*, Viktoria Kaminski, Shawn Lane, Mary Mallett, Melanie Phillips, Randall Wise.

 

Barberton: Justice Bole, Kaitlin Caesar, Madelyn Davis, Alexis Huntsman, Mary Keim, Ashley Meadows, Kara Morey, Cole Nichols, Katherine Seiter, Rachel Seitz, Jamie Stumpf.

 

Beach City: Brandy Bishop, Caprice Swedren.

 

Bedford: Desmond Bolden.        

 

Berlin Center: Jaylen Grubbs.

 

Bolivar: Breanna Burrier, David Copen, Kaylyn Lloyd, Leda McConaha, Rachel Slankard, Gabrielle Tausch, Landen Thompson*, Aliecia Weekley.

 

Brewster: Erycka Byer, Zane Fisher, Gabrielle Russo, Juliana Spivey.

 

Broadview Heights: Jason Sandusky. 

 

Canal Fulton: Angelica Aronson, Macey Biros, Kylie Collmar, Reagan Fincher*, Paige Fetzer, Carrie Jones, Emily Liknes, Aidan McCoy, Catherine McKelroy, Elizabeth Mumau, Angelia Nicolardi, Leonard Paoletti, Olivia Paoletti, Andrew Trewin.

 

Canfield: Molly Davidson. 

 

Canton: Samuel Aegerter, Emma Allen, Macy Allen, Nicole Badertscher, Lauren Barbato, Alanna Barzda, Matthew Blanton, Jacob Blose, Sarah Boda, Jessica Bracken, Ashley Braham*, Makenzea Briggs, Mara Brinker, Cailin Brooks, Julia Brooks, Nancy Brown, Rylee Brown, Dora Brumbaugh, Xena Burden*, Andrew Burwell*, Aaron Byrd, Rachelle Calabria, Christopher Campanelli, Benjamin Cochran, Christopher Cook, Rebekah Cornell, Alexandra Cumo, Giana D'Andrea, James Daugherty, Maya Demchak, Kurt Denning, Zhanri Desphy, Amber Duncan, Leanne Dye, Derek Firth, Victoria Fleming, Debra Ford, Jamila Freeman, Hector Garcia, Patrick Halle, Brian Hampe, Tanner Hamsher, Morgan Hancock, Sydney Hathaway, Matthew Herttna, Marynette Holmes, Skylyn Hooks, Hayley Horvath, Cassandra Jackson, Mitch Jacovetty, Christine Janson, Chase Jeffries, Alyssa Johnson, Marie-Victoria Kaplan, Ezra Keeton*, Alyssa Kerek, Joshua Kerr, Noor Khan, Emily Kidwell, Celena Krieg, Nicala Labus*, Alexis Lake, Emma Laughman, Katelynn Leach, Anna Lescallett, Emma Lewers, Eric Lieser, Ryan Liolios, Claire Loffarelli, Erykah Lofton, Adrianna Long, Christian Lucas, Raejean Lucius-Dansby, Corneliu Lup, Jenna Maher, Landen Marchand, Daniel Maurer, Rachel Mayle, Shante Mays, Robert McBride, Tyler McClellan, Shaun McMyler, Gabriel McPherson, Nathanael McPherson, Dylan Mease, Rachel Menegay, Katie Mick, Samantha Miller, Alicia Millican, Desiree Mitchell, Madison Moore, Grant Nadler, Kaylah Napier, Joseph Neff, Phong Nguyen*, Mia Owens*, Brooke Pandrea, Jessica Pantoja, Ethan Peterson, Garrett Pikus, Emily Quinn, Kayla Rauschenbach, Alexis Reese, John Repko, Kamarin Ricker, Kent Ring, Lauren Rogers*, Lauren Rooney, Matthew Sherlin*, Megan Smead, Lexy Smith, Lyndsey Smith, Corey Snook, Brittany Spangler*, Brianna Sprout, Dakota Starks, Alexander Sweeney, Alexis Taylor*, Lauren Tarver, Alishia Terrigan, Abigail Thouvenin*, Michael Tovissi, Deanna Trubisky, Emily Tyler, Kaitlyn Unklesbay, Emily Vossen, Taylor Vossen, William Waller*, Megan Wasik, Hailey Weaver*, Taylor Weaver*, Braden Wehrenberg, Michael Weinstock, Sarah Weinstock, Nathan Wells, Carla Yoder, David Ziegler.

 

Carrollton: Zara Pyles*.

 

Chardon: Kaylee Evans.

 

Cleveland: Andrea Huff.

 

Cleveland Heights: Madeleine McKinney. 

 

Clinton: Anna Gruska, Timothy Haines, Zachary Harvey, Zoe Polacheck.

 

Columbiana: John Sipahioglu.

 

Copley: Jordan Ziss.

 

Coventry Township: Joseph Schermesser.

 

Cuyahoga Falls: Kirk Baglia, Thomas Behner, Benjamin Chandler, Matthew Fox, Isabella Francek, Tyler Jarrells, Jakele Kelly, Corey Large, Mackenzie O’Neill.

 

Dalton: Brooke Denning, Jacob Thompson.

 

Dennison: Jillian Keen.

 

Dover: Audrea Beamer, Sarah Bitticker, Kylie Hay, Jewell Lewis, Caitlin McCaslin, Taylor McInturf, William Nowak, Broc Siegenthaler.

 

Doylestown: Kendall Evard, Allison Popelka, Ashley Popelka.

 

Dundee: Alexander Baker.

 

East Canton: Briannea Cantera, Nicole Mayle, Mickala Roberts, Christopher Sahli, Walter Wilks.

 

East Rochester: Lane Elton.

 

East Sparta: Toni Haymond, Julia Majzun, Dakota Sciury.

 

Fairlawn: Traiana Boyer, Leah Miller.

 

Geneva: Bryan Whitten.

 

Hanoverton: Dalton Thompson.

 

Hartville: Megan Behon, Zachariah Brockway, Zachary Cino*, Sean Cooley, Joshua Hershberger, Cameron Jones, Aaron McComas, McKenzie Preston, Brendan Romigh, Seth Swallen, Jaime Tobin, Micaela Wagler, Robert Watson, Olivia Yoder*.   

 

Kensington: Cameron Haught.

 

Killbuck: Savannah Rogers.

 

Lakemore: George Hayden*.

 

Las Vegas, Nevada: Karl Stennett

 

Louisville: Clay Akins, Emily Anderson, Kory Arner, Michaela Banta, Rachel Bartsch, Amanda Blind, Loretta Bonam, Katherine Brown, Kevin Coblentz, Casey Corrigan, Timothy Donnelly, Ashley Evans, Andrew Frazier, Lydia Frere, Katie Getz, Angela Godwin, Sara Haidet, Kelli Harter, Meghan Harter, Alex Hewitt, Emily Hollifield, Adam Ivey, Kaitlin Leach, Ashley Light, Madelyn Lombardi, Theresa Lovrak, Derek Mazak, Zoe McKimmie, Madison Miller, Nicole Motts, Hollyann Mullett, Branden Nau, Sean Nims, Theno Pantelides*, Reis Rankin, Ana Tahir, Josie Thomas, Nicolas Vannostran, Brianna Yacono.

 

Madison: Jacob Brent.

 

Magnolia: Madeline Bland*, Olivia Bland, Nathaniel Clark, Allison Eyster, Scott Johnson, Augustus Lancaster, Taina Stratton, Alexis Zehnder.

 

Malvern: Jordan Browning, Matilee Custer, Amanda McCann.

 

Mansfield: Nathaniel Arnholt.

 

Massillon: Sara Alam, Benjamin Alkire, Kaitlynn Arney, Vincent Arrigo, Grace Bailey, Sidney Barnhill, Dylan Beadle, Victor Berni, Megyn Bostic, Jade Brundelet*, Michael Caiazza, Regina Chu, Benjamin Cookson, Gary Couch, Jacob Cronk, Danielle Dalton, Cody Davis, Julia Endress, Alex Farabaugh, Megan Farrabee*, Victoria Ferrante, Lindsey Foradas, Christina Gillmore, Adrianna Globokar, Sophia Gough*, Kyle Gruber, Pailey Harris, Sidney Heid*, Mallory Henderson, Mariah Hoffman, Marissa Hoover, Matthew Hudak, McKenzie Jarvis, Taylor Klusti-Palmer, Jason Lacourt, Kiara Lauer, Kerstin Legg, Aubrey Lightfoot, Brenna Lightfoot, Victoria Litman, Joe Longo, Jennifer Lootens, Rebecca Malich, Schyler Maxhimer, Meghan McDonald, DeSean McElroy, Jessica McMurtry, Nicholas Nonno, Kayla Norris, Hope Paul*, Alexander Pearsall, Anthony Pizzino, Devanie Powell, Anmol Preet, Apolinar Rivera, Aaron Robey, Brittany Roush, Stephany Sherritt, Christopher Smer, Dillon Smith, Jason Smith, Brandy Snyder*, Makayla Stone, Sasha Storsin, Nathan Talafous, Radley Tan*, Johnathan Theis, Sarah Vega, Haley Walker*, Susanna Walker, Maggie Zaleski.

 

Medina: Nathan Yoak.   

 

Millersburg: Lucas Eastep, Matthew Eastep, Riley Hershberger.

 

Mineral City: Holly Geisinger.

 

Minerva: Casey Bates, Arec Burman, Cody Davis, Deborah Jenkins, Sara Thompson, Hannah Wiedlebacher, Derek Zwahlen.

 

Mogadore: Ryleigh Butler, Miranda Etheredge, Jenna Fleming*, Baylie Huth, Jena Marion, Macy Martin, Justin Mills, Brianna Moore, Micaela Pope, Abigail Rick, Miranda Rosato, Madison Schrader, Olivia Speicher, Sarah Speicher*.

 

Mount Eaton: Donovan Byler*.

 

Navarre: Chloe Chapman, Lyndsay Cole, Ottie Hosler, Maria Jones, Abigail Klein, Chase Lutes, Payton Lutz*, Cassandra McCabe, Katelyn Miller, Brittany Parker, Jordan Smith.

 

New Carlisle: Sylvia Ward.

 

New Franklin: Amanda Coteat, Amanda Cox, Neil Hoxworth, Taleb Husein, Lyndsay Kapper, Ian McCartt, Samantha Riffle, David Squires, Camille Tenney, Emily Tenney, Mark Terry, Joshua Wenhold*, Ryan Wile.

 

New Philadelphia: Claire Carpenter, Alexander Gaskin, Whitney Hendershot, Malaya Henry, Maddison Miles, Nicholas Miller, Spencer Morgan, Hannah Reedy, Marcia Trouts.

 

North Canton: Madison Beadling, Vy Bui, Matthew Burrier, Colleen Carl*, Tyler Celce, Jenna Covalesky, Alyssa Durocher, Delayna Durr, Justin Eckman, Hayden Evans, Amanda Fowler, George Gilbert, Micah Goncalves, Shawn Hartney, Christopher Hinshaw, Madisyn Husted, Callie Hyde, Matthew Jones, Erin Kennedy, Alex Kiel*, Emma Kirkbride, Caleb Kovach, Molly Lewis, Michael Mathieu, Alexandra Miller, Noah Miller, Katelyn Mizener, Mariah Morris, Marissa Mountain, Andrew Mulvey, James Musacchia, Donald Natale, Zachary Oatley, Faith Romans, Nicole Sanderson, Mark Shelton*, Caya Smarr, Dylanni Smith, Katelynne Smith, Maclain Spencer, James Trzop, Madeleine Wagler.

 

North Jackson: Jonathon McCann.          

 

North Lawrence: Anthony DeGregory , Alisa Guilliams, Jacob Huffman, Jakob Loar.

 

Norton: Thomas Bullock, Rebecca Hill, Rachel Hornyak, Noah Kornas, Jaret Krawczyk, John Polles, Megan Somerick.

 

Orrville: Julia Hackett.

 

Orwell: Margaret McCartney.

 

Ravenna: Paige Henson, Alexis Reynolds, Gabrielle Shyne, Samantha Smith.

 

Richfield: Stephanie Bierman. 

 

Rootstown: Morgan Youngblood*.

 

Salem: Matthew Carson, Zachary Coker, Leanne Strawn*, Charity Townsend.

 

Salineville: Casey Carman.

 

Sandyville: Cassidy Tope*.

 

Seville: Olivia Metzger, Michaela Schroeder.

 

Stow: Andrew Daisher, Zachery Daisher, Katie Flynn*, Kaitlyn Rueschman, Cierra Terry.

 

Strasburg: Donovan Davis, Richelle Leatherman, Madison Winters.

 

Streetsboro: Jake Famageltto.

 

Strongsville: Jeremy Simpson.

 

Sugarcreek: Miranda Click.

 

Tallmadge: Toni Boling, Maria Fortseras, Emily Francis, Daphnie Neal*, Shayla Norris, Miranda Pyka.

 

Tippecanoe: Megan Peters.

 

Uniontown: John Barnett, Bryce Black, Jonathan Brooke, Kelsey Casenhiser, Anthony Clement, Caitlin Clupper, Krista Harland, Jeanine Hasan, Edward Henderson, Calvin Koch, Bethany Kuebler, Azia Layman, Ashley Lehmier, Jeffry Lengel, Andrea Maag, Savanna McElwain, Sierra McElwain, Samuel Merendino, Abigail Miller, Ethan Miller, Carly Nevinski, Carrie O’Neill, Kara Parsons, Allison Pierce, Stefanie Piscitello, Jacob Rummell, Jessica Rummell, Alyssa Schippert, Clayton Spicer, Erin Stewart, Amanda Stropoli, Alison Troyer, Joseph Van’t Hooft, Kaitlyn Wallace, Rachel Watson, Layne Wheeler, Liliana Yerrick.

 

Wadsworth: Amanda Browning, Molly Chamier, Brianna Clark*, Nathaniel Davis, Tyler Gnatowski, Ian Lamb, Molly Lamb, Link Maynard, Tiffany Weiss, Brennan Williams.

 

Waterford, Pennsylvania: Katherine Connell.

 

Waynesburg: McKenzie Haidet, Hanzala Khalid, Rebecca Roth, Kelsey Wagner.

 

Wellsville: Zachary Talbott.

 

West Lafayette: Dennis Varian.

 

West Salem: Jamie Campbell.

 

Whitehall: Emily Wyman.

 

Windham: Brandon Baker.         

 

Wooster: Callie Caltrider, Steven Freyman, Hannah Sanchez, Shannon Showers, Alexander Yost.           

 

Youngstown: Carolyn Seeco.

 

Zoarville: Haley Reed.

 

Undisclosed address: Kristen Eckhardt, Ryan Parrish.

 

International Students: 

 

Kampala, Uganda: Evangeline Pacific. 

 

Beijing, China: Xiaoyi Liu, Ming Kang Su, Anqi Wang, SiQi Xia, Chang Hao Xue, Tong Yu, Boyuan Zhang, Xunan Zhao.

 

HanZhong, China: Li Hao Dan.

 

Shenzhen, China: Yaohao Chen, Rongfang Huang, Guijun Huang, Haocen Jiang, Yuanjun Li, Faqiang Lin, Yongjie  Luo, Zhiping Qiu, Jiawei Wen, Yuanyuan Xiao, Manli Yang, Xiangan Zeng, Shiting Zhan, Yan Zhang, Zhizhi Zheng.

 

Xi’an, China: Meixi Chen, Hongjian Li, Miaoyuan Ma, Jiaxi Xiang*, Chuyuan Xu.

 

Monday, January 14, 2019

Kent State University at Stark is proud to again host the 65th Northeast Central Ohio Scholastic Art Exhibit and Awards Ceremony.

The exhibition features more than 400 pieces of artwork from middle and high school students, representing districts in Stark, Summit, Portage, Wayne, Tuscarawas and Medina counties.

65th Scholastic Art Awards & Exhibition
January 14 - 30, 2019
Fine Arts Building

Kent State University at Stark
Monday - Thursday: 7 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Friday: 7 a.m. - 5 p.m.

A regional awards ceremony for students and their families will take place on Saturday, Jan. 26, in the Kent State Stark Conference Center. The Fine Arts Building will be open that Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Stark Campus is one of 90 regional partners that sponsor the local awards program. Middle and high school art and photography students will receive Silver and Gold Key awards for their efforts. Several special awards, including the American Vision awards, also will be presented.

The artwork of Gold Key winners, American Vision and portfolio recipients will be forwarded to the national level in New York City. Winners will be announced at the National Student Art Exhibition of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards in June. Students will be notified if their work has been selected.

The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards are the largest, longest-running and most prestigious recognition program for creative young people in the United States.

Friday, December 14, 2018

Ashley Spellman is one of 139 in the 2018 Fall graduating class at Kent State Stark.

Ashley Spellman is no stranger to the kitchen. For seven months, she worked daily rolling out dough to make pies. She learned how to cook them just right – with a bubbly filling and a golden-brown crust.

She enjoyed her job, but she also knew her future held more than transforming apples into a perfectly baked pastry. She attended college once, shortly after graduating from Waterloo High School. She dropped out within two weeks. The university was too big, and “just too much” for this once self-described shy teen. 

She took a year off school. She baked pies. Two weeks before fall semester 2015, her mother, a schoolteacher in her hometown of Randolph, urged her daughter to apply to Kent State University at Stark.

“I had no clue what I wanted to do, and I wasn’t even sure if college was for me,” Spellman said. “I used to be very quiet and reserved. I guess you can say I found myself at Kent State Stark.”

Spellman joined Undergraduate Student Government (USG) and helped co-found Flash’s Food Pantry. She also was a member of the campus’ first Homecoming Court this fall.

“When I began taking courses at Kent State Stark, I learned this is much more than a college,” she said. “You are joining a community. And, that, is what makes it so special.” 

Spellman is one of nearly 140 students in this year’s fall class who completed at least 51 percent of their coursework at Kent State Stark. 

STEPPING OUT

Once afraid to speak in front of a crowd, this 23-year-old has overcome her fears – earning a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies. She credits Paul Sommer, Ph.D., assistant professor of communication studies, with fostering her interest in the field. 

“He was one of my first communication professors, and I knew speaking in front of others was a weakness of mine,” Spellman said. “But, I learned that communication is so much more than public speaking.” 

She said the campus’ dedicated faculty and staff have “really helped me blossom into who I am.”

Ashley Brightbill, manager of the Office of Student Involvement, met Spellman as a freshman. Brightbill has witnessed Spellman’s growth over the past three years, as she has pursued leadership roles in student government and represented the campus as a member of the Homecoming Court.

“It has been a privilege to watch her grow and mature into the amazing young woman she is today,” Brightbill said. “I have no doubt she will continue to make this world a better place. Ashley (Spellman) has served this campus so well, and we are grateful for her contributions.” 

As treasurer of USG, Spellman said her proudest accomplishment is witnessing the success of the on-campus food pantry.

“It is great to see how we help students struggling with food insecurity and how we partner with the Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank,” she said. “Of course, the goal is no visits, but I think it is great to see we are meeting a need and really making a difference.”

PERFECT TIMING

Now, the Portage County resident, once unsure college was for her, graduates Dec. 16 after finishing all of her coursework in three years’ time. 

“My parents were my No. 1 support system through it all,” Spellman said. “Before I found my fit at Kent State Stark, they were still excited for me when all I was bringing home was pies. They always knew I would go back to college when the time was right.”

And, as every good baker knows, the key to getting it just right comes down to precisely measured ingredients and a dash of perfect timing.
 

Friday, December 07, 2018

Kent State University at Stark’s faculty are a force in the community, working to better the region by offering their academic expertise in a tangible way. Kent State Stark brings immeasurable value to community organizations, the health care industry, environmental groups and more.

Faculty tackle the kind of real-world issues that touch Stark County, making our home a better place to live. These campus leaders guard the region against some of the country’s most pressing concerns – from water quality to end-of-life care choices to navigating an online presence on the “anything goes” information highway. They are on the frontlines researching, addressing, educating.

Professors Angela Guercio, Kim Garchar and Robert Hamilton are part of the knowledge base at Stark County’s hometown university.

“We are not meant to be the ivory tower,” said Garchar. “We are meant to share the talents that are housed in our university.

"Contributing to the good of the community does not just happen in the four walls of our classrooms, it is the impact we have outside of those walls.”


Angela Guercio, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Computer Science

Angela Guercio’s passion for computer science extends beyond the classroom. Her students help develop websites for organizations located throughout Northeast Ohio. But the longtime Kent State Stark faculty member does much more than create webpages for area nonprofits; she fosters purpose in computer science students who see the impact of an online presence.

“Creating a website requires more than simple I.T. knowledge,” said Guercio, who has been teaching at Kent State Stark since 2005. “When nonprofits request help, we do it because it is not only an I.T. learning experience; it is a community experience where students learn to translate the needs of an organization.”

The nonprofit may harness the power of a website to educate the public, solicit financial donations, promote upcoming events and more. Guercio’s class has made prototypes for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and the Magnolia Historical Society. Students also designed websites for the Navarre-Bethlehem Township Historical Society and the Italian-American organization, Il Cenacolo Italiano di Cleveland.

Guercio expects the addition of web-programming courses during the 2018-19 academic year to expand service-learning opportunities.

During her time at Kent State Stark, one of her primary goals has been to grow the computer science discipline on campus. And she has. Enrollment has increased from 42 students in fall 2010 to 103 students last fall.

A native of Italy, Guercio is active in the Ohio Celebration of Women in Computing (OCWiC), which encourages and supports both minorities and women, who are currently a minority in the discipline, to engage in computer science studies. Guercio’s students also have designed websites for the organization’s annual conference.  

“Students have to prepare for the world out there since technology is always in a state of transition and evolution,” said Guercio. “What is better than practicing and learning by offering a service to the community?”


Kim GarcharKim Garchar, Ph.D.
Associate Professor OF Philosophy

Kim Garchar talks about death and dying a lot. She forgets the conversation is not a normal one.

But, it is her primary area of research. As a member of Summa Health System’s ethics committee, Garchar often deals with end-of-life issues.

“This is, to me, the second most important part of my job, with the first being teaching students,” she said. “Assisting health care providers and servicing the community, both of those things are supported by my research and scholarship.”

Garchar’s field of research in ethics, which is about a good life, and health care, which is about providing a good life, go hand in hand.

Garchar first began working at Summa’s Akron Campus 10 years ago, when she became a faculty member at Kent State Stark. The ethics team handles requests for ethics consults, education within the hospital and organizational communication.

Anyone can request an ethics consult – patient, family member, nurse, doctor and so on. “We try to analyze situations where there are values conflicts,” she explained. “The care team could feel something is inappropriate that the family is requesting. We try to understand and name the different values represented and offer suggestions and recommendations, not answers.”

Garchar’s work as a bioethicist also includes analyzing hospital policies where there are values conflicts, such as futile treatment, which is defined as care that is non-beneficial to the patient. “We need a policy for those instances.”

Originally from Colorado, Garchar said she couldn’t be happier to invest in Northeast Ohio.

“I am motivated by the problems we encounter in health care,” she said. “Honestly, I am able to teach better because of the work I get to do out in the community. I bring all of those real-life experiences back to the classroom.” 


Robert HamiltonRobert Hamilton IV, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biological Sciences

As a child growing up in the city of Canton, Robert Hamilton played in Nimishillen Creek. Today, he’s working to save it.

A collaborator with Stark Parks for the past 10 years, Hamilton and his students began a new phase in the Cottonwood Wetland Restoration Project.  

“All waters affect one another; they are all connected,” explained Hamilton. “So, when you better one, another also benefits.”  

Sippo Lake’s 4.3-acre Cottonwood Wetland recently was restored by Nick Morris, former education department manager at Stark County Park District and now an adjunct professor at Kent State Stark.

“It is a team effort,” said Hamilton, who worked with Morris on the restoration project. “We all work together to protect the environment.”

This summer, Hamilton and his students examined the restoration’s progress, paying special attention to sediment and water flow, bacteria and fungi in the water, as well as water chemistry. “Any environmental project that you restore, you have to ask – is it functioning?” he said. “Wetlands are supposed to provide habitat, filter sediment and more.

“This wetland acts as a buffer zone between the surrounding land and water, enhancing conservation,” said Hamilton, adding that the Cottonwood restoration contributes to the larger regional water system, the Muskingum River Watershed.

For this 13-year faculty member at Kent State Stark, giving back is part of his DNA. An Eagle Scout, his love of the outdoors began early. The graduate of McKinley High School found a natural fit at the Stark Campus.

“We are the resident experts. We live in these communities, so we have a vested interest,” he said. “Not only do I have a desire to improve the water quality, but I have fond memories of good times in the Nimishillen.”

Thursday, December 06, 2018

The Conference Center and Corporate University build relationships and support the educational needs of regional employers.

Faith Sheaffer-Polen has conducted workforce training amid construction, in buildings with sanitation issues and in crowded hotel rooms while sitting on the edge of a bathtub. That’s one reason why the director of Kent State University at Stark’s Corporate University urges employers to undertake professional education in a setting that is conducive to learning.

Enter the Conference Center. The International Association of Conference Centers (IACC)-certified venue provides businesses and organizations preparing for their next session a professional environment to train their workforce, tackle strategic planning or enhance team building.

“Trainers know the best sessions take place outside of the everyday distractions of the office,” said Sheaffer-Polen. “The Conference Center provides an environment that is conducive to learning, giving guests what they need to be more productive and have an engaged meeting.”

Stephanie Monastra, director of the Conference Center, said her team’s goal is to exceed guests’ needs. “We see it as our responsibility, as part of an institution of higher learning, to provide the right environment where learning can take place,” she said. “There’s no better place than being on a college campus, where there’s already so much innovation happening.”

MCTV, Massillon, Canton and Wooster’s one-stop source for residential internet, TV, and phone service, sought customized training from the Corporate University last year. Employees traveled to the Conference Center for one-day sessions over the course of nine months for the series, which included management and supervisory training, communication strategies and DiSC. The MCTV team held a graduation ceremony for employees and their families at the Conference Center after the training concluded.

“The Corporate University training was amazing and just what we needed. The sessions were interactive and the instructors were engaging,” said Katherine Gessner Duplay, MCTV’s director of strategic planning and policy. “There is an atmosphere of making training feel special when it is off site. And, the Conference Center is so good, from its location to the fact it encompasses everything you need: food, meeting rooms and the technology.”

As Sheaffer-Polen and Monastra embark upon the upcoming academic year, the duo plans to increase penetration rate in Stark County. “It is about getting the message out there,” said Sheaffer-Polen. “Kent State University is in your backyard and we can help you in a variety of ways, from workforce training to hosting community events and more.”

Said Monastra, “We are getting out there together and working as a team to offer workforce training in a facility that provides the proper learning environment. No other team can do what we do. “We have the power of Kent State behind us. This is our sole business – meeting the needs of the workforce and community groups and supporting our region’s success.”

Conference Center

Renowned Training Meets Certified Experience

CORPORATE UNIVERSITY
The Corporate University provides highly experienced and credentialed subject matter experts, competitive pricing and quality workforce training. Along with customized professional education for businesses, the Corporate University holds open-enrollment sessions, which include supervisory and management certificate series, social media, Excel training and more. Free surveys also are available to assess training needs. Find out more at www.kent.edu/stark/cucc/corporate-university.

CONFERENCE CENTER
The IACC-certified Conference Center is the perfect venue for a meeting, trade show or business event. Take advantage of a distraction-free environment, state-of-the-art technology and expert support and service. The Conference Center’s new healthy meeting initiative offers guests healthy food options and strategic  breaks that positively affect attention and productivity, contributing to a successful session. Find out more at www.kent.edu/stark/cucc/conference-center.

What does it mean to be IACC-certified?
The Kent State University at Stark Conference Center is one of just five IACC-certified conference centers in Ohio. The International Association of Conference Centers (IACC) is a global community delivering innovative and exceptional meeting experiences. The IACC certification is considered “a global badge of honor” that is trusted by meeting planners worldwide. All members conform to a comprehensive global set of criteria and standards in physical meeting room design, food and beverage and service-related standards. Learn more at www.iacconline.org.

 

Thursday, December 06, 2018

Survivor.

Acres away from the farmer’s home, Jennifer Peterson stared hard at the bright blue sky. Then, darkness. In and out of consciousness, she tried to move. Only pain.

She tried to scream. Her cries for help were mere whispers.

The tractor came from a distance. Had the farmer not remembered his dream during the night, Peterson is sure she would have died that day. A praying man, he later told her that God came to him in a dream, instructing him to plow the withered cornfield. 

The summer of 1988 marked the North American drought and remains the hottest and driest on record. 

“There wasn’t much to plow that day, but dust and dirt,” Peterson said. 

“He was going out on faith.” Obedience led him to discover then 16-year-old Peterson, bleeding and alone. Dumped in his field along a desolate Tuscarawas County road, Peterson had been riding her bicycle when a drunken driver hit her.

“There is a reason I am still here,” she said.

These days, she finds purpose inside Dr. Brian Chopko’s classroom. She met Chopko nine years ago, when she was a student in his victimology class. As she told Chopko her story, fate played its cards. Since then, she visits Kent State Stark each semester to tell future law enforcers and attorneys her personal account of what it is like to live through a crime.

“For a victim, it will always feel like yesterday,” she said. “We can go back to each feeling. We can replay it vividly. We relive it over and over again.”

She also tells Chopko’s criminal justice students what it is like to take control of those feelings, to heal, to transition from victim to survivor.

Today, the Minerva woman owns a jewelry business and credits her Kent State University degrees in accounting and business management as contributors to her success. She plans to attend KSU once again to pursue a degree in criminal justice. “I’d love to help crime victims. Help them see there is life after this.”

Her “life after this” took years to arrive. First, Peterson had to heal physically. The accident severed her right arm. Her other arm was broken, as well as her leg and pelvis. Plates and pins still hold her bones together. Her broken neck remains fused in two places.

She relearned how to live left-handed. She learned how to stand and walk again. She also learned how to forgive the man who was convicted of her attempted murder.

“I was angry, really angry for a long time,” said Peterson. “As a crime victim, you go through the stages of grief. The Jennifer that I was, that Jennifer died. A new Jennifer had to be born.”

Thirty years since the accident, there is purpose behind the pain. When Peterson speaks to victims, she speaks with authority because she has overcome.

Although left for dead in the night, barren farmland all around, there was a new day for Jennifer Peterson.

“There is better on the other side.”

Thursday, December 06, 2018

Communicating hope.

Ashton Blake briefly peered into the crowd gathered at the E.J. Thomas Performing Arts Hall.

The stage was his. 

Saxophone in hand, Blake began to play the solo he knew so well. Practicing for this day was an honor and privilege for the 20-something who was a skilled musician before he had reached middle school.

Gospel Meets Symphony was one of the highlights of Blake’s budding career. The music technology program at Kent State University at Stark afforded Blake opportunities like this one, performing with the Akron Symphony Orchestra.

“At Kent State Stark, I learned the production side of the business while also continuing to perform,” said Blake, who dreams of becoming a professional musician.

An Akron native, Blake didn’t mind the commute to Canton. “I have friends who are graduating (elsewhere) with $70,000 in debt. That’s not me.”

He credits his brother Will, also a Kent State Stark music technology graduate, with steering him toward the affordable, quality program.

During his time at the Stark Campus, Blake sought to give back as a member of Undergraduate Student Government. He helped found Flash’s Food Pantry, the campus foodbank that provides for students in need.

For Blake, the desire to help came from a place of experience. Once standing in a food pantry line, he understands firsthand the need is great. “Food insecurity doesn’t go away because you are a commuter campus,” he said, “especially for college students, who are paying the bills and for the books.”

Learning to be resourceful can often come from a place of disparity. And this 22-year-old experienced growth in his valley of uncertainty. “You can stay there in that place, or keep pushing forward.

“My family pushed forward.” 

Blake carries that with him. As he pours himself into his music, the often-quiet Blake finds his voice while playing saxophone, as the notes rise and fall, fall and rise. From melancholy to optimistic. Communicating hope without saying a word.

Taking the stage to perform, “that’s when I feel it. I stay locked in until the end. Then, I look up only when I hear it.”

The sound of applause.

Dreamers and Doers: Lainey Ward
Dreamers and Doers: Lainey Ward
Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Heart of gold.

Life was just beginning for Lainey Ward when doctors worked on her heart to keep it beating.

A 4-month-old baby, Ms. Ward was in the fight of her life before she knew what living really meant. Her whole world was mom and dad and the mobile dancing over her crib.

Open-heart surgery and operations to fix three birth defects kept Ms. Ward pushing forward, overcoming diagnosis after diagnosis.

First, the girl who would not live, did.

Then, the girl who could not walk, walked.

Later, the girl who found it difficult to learn would teach.

Today, Ms. Ward finds herself observing classrooms in preparation for leading lessons. A processing disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) meant learning how to learn differently. Her goals for tomorrow are intervening when children often need it most – in middle childhood.

“As a teacher, you can really make an impact during this transitional phase in a child’s education,” she says. “I’m specializing in math because I hated it. I realized I could do it, but I just had to work a little harder.

“I knew then it was going to be OK.”

That’s what Ms. Ward wants to impart as an intervention specialist and special education teacher, “to let these children know that we’re going to get through it together. Being their advocate is what drives me.”

Still, the Work Ethic Matters Scholarship recipient and student employee in the Office of Student Involvement almost didn’t make it to Kent State University at Stark. Pursuing a college education in her hometown of Springfield, near Dayton, she found herself in a dead-end program when she reached out to Curtis Tinlin, outreach program coordinator at Kent State Stark.

“I figured middle childhood education was a long shot,” said Ms. Ward, who knew Mr. Tinlin as a summer counselor at Camp Berean Way. “But (Tinlin) told me that’s a Stark Campus specialty. I thought it was a dream that I could find the program I wanted on a small campus at an affordable price.”

The first in her family to go away to college, Ms. Ward also was freed of the diagnosis she carried with her since infancy. Just before moving to Canton, Ms. Ward's heart specialist discharged her after a perfect echocardiogram. At 20, the world was hers.

“Seeing God’s hand in all of it, there are just so many miracles,” said Ms. Ward, who has found a home at Kent State Stark. “I get to wake up every day and come here, and I just love it so much.”

Through tragedy and triumph, Ms. Ward says she is right where she’s meant to be.

Dreamers and Doers: Lainey Ward
Dreamers and Doers: Lainey Ward
Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Heart of gold.

Life was just beginning for Lainey Ward when doctors worked on her heart to keep it beating.

A 4-month-old baby, Ms. Ward was in the fight of her life before she knew what living really meant. Her whole world was mom and dad and the mobile dancing over her crib.

Open-heart surgery and operations to fix three birth defects kept Ms. Ward pushing forward, overcoming diagnosis after diagnosis.

First, the girl who would not live, did.

Then, the girl who could not walk, walked.

Later, the girl who found it difficult to learn would teach.

Today, Ms. Ward finds herself observing classrooms in preparation for leading lessons. A processing disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) meant learning how to learn differently. Her goals for tomorrow are intervening when children often need it most – in middle childhood.

“As a teacher, you can really make an impact during this transitional phase in a child’s education,” she says. “I’m specializing in math because I hated it. I realized I could do it, but I just had to work a little harder.

“I knew then it was going to be OK.”

That’s what Ms. Ward wants to impart as an intervention specialist and special education teacher, “to let these children know that we’re going to get through it together. Being their advocate is what drives me.”

Still, the Work Ethic Matters Scholarship recipient and student employee in the Office of Student Involvement almost didn’t make it to Kent State University at Stark. Pursuing a college education in her hometown of Springfield, near Dayton, she found herself in a dead-end program when she reached out to Curtis Tinlin, outreach program coordinator at Kent State Stark.

“I figured middle childhood education was a long shot,” said Ms. Ward, who knew Mr. Tinlin as a summer counselor at Camp Berean Way. “But (Tinlin) told me that’s a Stark Campus specialty. I thought it was a dream that I could find the program I wanted on a small campus at an affordable price.”

The first in her family to go away to college, Ms. Ward also was freed of the diagnosis she carried with her since infancy. Just before moving to Canton, Ms. Ward's heart specialist discharged her after a perfect echocardiogram. At 20, the world was hers.

“Seeing God’s hand in all of it, there are just so many miracles,” said Ms. Ward, who has found a home at Kent State Stark. “I get to wake up every day and come here, and I just love it so much.”

Through tragedy and triumph, Ms. Ward says she is right where she’s meant to be.

Dreamers and Doers: Lainey Ward
Dreamers and Doers: Lainey Ward
Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Heart of gold.

Life was just beginning for Lainey Ward when doctors worked on her heart to keep it beating.

A 4-month-old baby, Ms. Ward was in the fight of her life before she knew what living really meant. Her whole world was mom and dad and the mobile dancing over her crib.

Open-heart surgery and operations to fix three birth defects kept Ms. Ward pushing forward, overcoming diagnosis after diagnosis.

First, the girl who would not live, did.

Then, the girl who could not walk, walked.

Later, the girl who found it difficult to learn would teach.

Today, Ms. Ward finds herself observing classrooms in preparation for leading lessons. A processing disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) meant learning how to learn differently. Her goals for tomorrow are intervening when children often need it most – in middle childhood.

“As a teacher, you can really make an impact during this transitional phase in a child’s education,” she says. “I’m specializing in math because I hated it. I realized I could do it, but I just had to work a little harder.

“I knew then it was going to be OK.”

That’s what Ms. Ward wants to impart as an intervention specialist and special education teacher, “to let these children know that we’re going to get through it together. Being their advocate is what drives me.”

Still, the Work Ethic Matters Scholarship recipient and student employee in the Office of Student Involvement almost didn’t make it to Kent State University at Stark. Pursuing a college education in her hometown of Springfield, near Dayton, she found herself in a dead-end program when she reached out to Curtis Tinlin, outreach program coordinator at Kent State Stark.

“I figured middle childhood education was a long shot,” said Ms. Ward, who knew Mr. Tinlin as a summer counselor at Camp Berean Way. “But (Tinlin) told me that’s a Stark Campus specialty. I thought it was a dream that I could find the program I wanted on a small campus at an affordable price.”

The first in her family to go away to college, Ms. Ward also was freed of the diagnosis she carried with her since infancy. Just before moving to Canton, Ms. Ward's heart specialist discharged her after a perfect echocardiogram. At 20, the world was hers.

“Seeing God’s hand in all of it, there are just so many miracles,” said Ms. Ward, who has found a home at Kent State Stark. “I get to wake up every day and come here, and I just love it so much.”

Through tragedy and triumph, Ms. Ward says she is right where she’s meant to be.

Wednesday, November 21, 2018

The award-winning ensemble is comprised of students, faculty and community members.

The public is invited to attend a free concert performed by the Kent State University at Stark Concert Band. 

The community concert will take place from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, at The Mary J. Timken Theatre, located in the newly expanded and renovated Fine Arts Building on the Stark Campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW.

Directed by Thomas Holliday, the Kent State Stark Concert Band was established more than 30 years ago. The award-winning ensemble is comprised of Kent State Stark affiliates, as well as students from neighboring universities, talented high school students and community musicians. 

Tickets are not required; all seating is general admission. For questions about Kent State Stark's music events, call 330-244-5151 or visit www.kent.edu/stark/music-events.


 

Wednesday, November 07, 2018

Comedic play is the first of the 2018-19 season.

Kent State University at Stark Theatre will hold its first theatrical production of the 2018-19 season, “Unnecessary Farce”, a comedy by playwright Paul Slade Smith.

The cast of “Unnecessary Farce” will take to the campus’ stage for opening night at 7:30 p.m. Friday in The Mary J. Timken Theatre, which is located in the newly expanded and renovated Fine Arts Building, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. 

Directed by Kent State Stark Theatre Director Jim Weaver, “Unnecessary Farce” is a play about an embezzling mayor who is supposed to meet with his female accountant in a cheap motel room. Two undercover police officers are in the room next door. Still, confusion abounds as to who is in which room, who has taken the money and who has hired a hit man. 

Performances will be held at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and at 2 p.m. Sunday. The show also will take place at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16 and 17, and at 2 p.m. Nov. 18.

Tickets for the show can be purchased online at www.kent.edu/stark/unnecessary-farce, by phone at 330-244-3348 or in person at the box office in the Fine Arts lobby. Will call opens one hour prior to performances. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for senior citizens and non-KSU students. Tickets are free to all Kent State students with student IDs.  
 

Flash's Professional Closet provides accessibility to fashion.
Friday, November 02, 2018

Even though Mendi Sample was born blind, she still cares about fashion. And she knows that finding an accessible place for professional clothing gives her an edge come graduation day. 

She’ll be looking for a job this spring after she graduates from Kent State University at Stark with her bachelor’s degree in psychology. 

“Just because I am blind doesn’t mean that I do not care about my clothing, or how I look,” said Sample, while at Flash’s Professional Closet preparing for a photo shoot to publicize the service. Located in the lower level of the Campus Center, the professional closet is free and open to all students.

Flash’s Professional Closet held its grand opening on campus this spring, and follows suit with similar endeavors at universities across the state. The closet is currently stocked with lots of clothing, thanks to a new community partnership with the Belden Village Mall. 

Flash’s Professional Closet has a visible presence at the mall through the creation of Flash’s Professional Closet Donation Station. The drop-off donation site serves as an encouragement for mall shoppers to donate gently used, or new, professional clothing to students in need of career-oriented apparel.

“Flash’s Professional Closet allows us at Belden Village Mall to maintain a connection with our community and our local students that we are so proud of and grateful for,” said Jennifer Grisez, marketing director at the Belden Village Mall. “We love that because of this initiative we can impact students of varying needs and help them overcome limited accessibility, as well as help them look amazing!”

FASHION FORWARD

Rose Montesano, a sophomore, helped Sample select a navy blue dress with flats to match for the recent photo shoot. Montesano, who is studying to become a special education teacher, said she enjoys helping people. 

“The smile they get when they achieve something they didn’t believe was possible, that’s really priceless, and that’s why I want to work in special education,” said the 20-year-old Marlington High School graduate.

For Sample, Montesano’s help meant a new friendship. “It’s so great when people take the time to see things from the other person’s point of view,” said Sample. “I don’t like to make being blind who I am. I don’t let it define me, but when people take the time to understand, that’s pretty special.”

Sight has escaped Sample for the past 47 years. Born premature, she has only known what it is like to see shapes and colors. Still, she says, “there’s so much help out there.” 

She said she’s happy to take life not only one day at a time, but one step at a time. And, thanks to Flash’s Professional Closet, she can make that step fashion forward.


Learn more about Flash's Professional Closet.
 

Friday, November 02, 2018

Mira Sorvino is an Academy Award-winning actress, documentary filmmaker, United Nations Goodwill Ambassador, silence breaker and passionate voice of the #MeToo movement and lifelong champion of victims of social injustice. 

Sorvino is the second presenter in this year’s Featured Speakers Series lineup. She’ll speak at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14. Now in its 28th year, the Featured Speakers Series is free and open to the public, but tickets are required and limited to two per person. 

Tickets for Sorvino’s presentation are available beginning at 7:30 a.m. Monday, Oct. 22, at the Main Hall information desk. Tickets will remain available, while supplies last, during regular business hours 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. 

Sorvino’s breakout acting role was in Woody Allen’s 1995 film, “Mighty Aphrodite”, which won her an Academy Award, a Golden Globe Award and Critics Choice for best supporting actress. 

Raised in a family of activists, Sorvino’s social conscience was ignited by her mother’s participation in the March on Washington with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It served as a catalyst for her own social activism and a lifetime of serving others. 

Proceeding Sorvino on Nov. 14, the series will feature civil rights activist Mary Frances Berry on Feb. 26, and bestselling author Nicholas Sparks on April 17. 

Programs are held in Timken Great Hall at the Kent State University at Stark Conference Center. Doors open at 6:45 p.m.

For more information, visit www.kent.edu/stark/featured-speakers-series.
 

Friday, November 02, 2018

Kent State University at Stark will host a Campus Preview for high school juniors, seniors and their families on Nov. 17.

Campus tours will be held from 8 to 8:30 a.m. and depart from the lobby at Main Hall, 6000 Frank Ave. NW. The program will take place from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Campus Preview will introduce prospective students to Kent State Stark’s academic programs, departments and services in an informal atmosphere to allow for questions and conversation. Attendees will meet with representatives from Kent State Stark’s Admissions, Financial Aid, Advising, Academic Support Services and Student Involvement, as well as faculty members.

Students can choose from 20-plus degree programs – including the new Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies – offered entirely at Kent State Stark. Students also can complete coursework toward more than 282 undergraduate programs at Kent State University.

Prospective students are encouraged to submit their college application during the event when the $40 application fee will be waived.

Attendees should RSVP by Nov. 15.

REGISTER FOR CAMPUS PREVIEW

For more information, contact Kristin Wray at kwray1@kent.edu or 330-244-3289.
 

Monday, October 29, 2018

You're invited to experience the sights and sounds of Kent State University at Stark's Fine Arts Building Renovation & Expansion on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018.

SCHEDULE OF FEATURED EVENTS
 

Arts iconGuided Tours
4:30 - 6 p.m.
Fine Arts Expansion & Renovation

Technology demonstrations; vocal rehearsal previews and performances; arts in action, including sculpture and ceramics; theatre and more!
 

Paint iconArt Exhibition Opening: "Recent Work"
4:30 - 7 p.m.
The William J. and Pearl F. Lemmon Visiting Artist Gallery

Exhibition opening and meet and greet with artists, Sue Collier and Sarah Schuster.
 

Theatre iconTheatre Rehearsal for "Unnecessary Farce"
6:30 p.m.
The Mary J. Timken Theatre

Watch a brief rehearsal in action of the comedy by Paul Slade Smith. Unnecessary Farce opens Nov. 9. Learn more about Unnecessary Farce.
 

music iconGuitar Weekend Opening Performance
7 p.m.
114 Fine Arts, Rehearsal Hall

Enjoy the opening performance by guitarist, Marc Teicholz. View the full Guitar Weekend schedule.


CONTACT

Kelly Piero
Special Events Coordinator
330-244-3223
kpiero1@kent.edu

Boo U Fall Festival
Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Kent State University at Stark is transformed into “Boo U” on Oct. 25 for an evening of family friendly fun.

Kent State Stark will host the tenth annual educational fall celebration for elementary school-aged children from 5 to 7 p.m. at its campus, 6000 Frank Ave. NW in Jackson Township. Boo U is free and open to the public.

Children can trick or treat at stations designed and decorated by Kent State Stark student organizations. Trick-or-treating starts at the main parking lot off Frank Avenue NW.

The event also features several family-oriented activities, including games, a photo station and more. During the “Swamp Walk,” families are invited to tour the pond and learn about wetland research by Kent State Stark students.

Children are invited to enter the Boo U coloring contest for a chance to win a prize. Visit the event webpage at www.kent.edu/stark/boo-u-fall-festival and bring completed artwork to any event table. Winners will be selected and contacted during the week following the event.

Some candy distributed during this event may contain nuts, eggs, soy, wheat, gluten, milk products and other food allergens. Parents are encouraged to dress children appropriately, as activities take place outside – rain or shine.

For more information on Boo U, visit www.kent.edu/stark/boo-u-fall-festival.

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Kent State University at Stark will present Guitar Weekend, a three-day festival for guitar enthusiasts, Nov. 1-3.

Free and open to the public, the event is a celebration of all styles of guitar playing and features some of the most respected guitarists nationwide. 

Organized by Kent State Stark’s Music Department, Guitar Weekend is in its third year and blends a series of guitar workshops and concerts during the three-day span. 

Featured artists will include Marc Teicholz, Mobius Trio and Andrew Stroud. 

The weekend will kick off with a concert by Teicholz, a classical guitarist, at 7 p.m. Nov. 1 as part of the campus’ Celebration of the Arts in the newly renovated and expanded Fine Arts Building. 

The Celebration of the Arts also is free and open to the public. Beginning at 4:30 p.m. Nov. 1, the event includes guided tours of the Fine Arts expansion, the opening of new art exhibition “Recent Work” and a meet-and-greet with the visiting artists prior to the Guitar Weekend opening performance. 

At 7 p.m. Nov. 2, Guitar Weekend continues with Mobius Trio performing in concert at The Hub Art Factory, 336 Sixth St. NW, in downtown Canton as part of the city’s First Friday celebration.

Beginning at noon Nov. 3, Kent State Stark faculty will perform with classical guitarist Andrew Stroud. A community concert featuring the McKinley High School Guitar Ensemble, the Canton Youth Guitar Ensemble and Kent State Stark music students will be held at 2 p.m. Both concerts are in the campus’ Main Hall auditorium.

Visit www.kent.edu/stark/guitar-weekend for more about the featured artists, including videos.
 

Friday, October 19, 2018

Honors Program students organize event as a way to educate the public on the growing concern of human trafficking.

Tatyana Ragon has witnessed firsthand the good that can come from a bad situation. Once she felt broken. A victim of sexual abuse, she fought to rise above. To be more than a statistic. More than a circumstance. 

Ragon is not the first to call herself an overcomer, but she’s earned the title. A day doesn’t pass when she doesn’t take the pain and let it propel her to benefit those around her. One day, she’ll be a nurse and she will help women in situations like the one she found herself in. 

Today, she fights for those without a voice. 

As an organizer of Kent State University at Stark’s Anti-Human Trafficking Symposium, Ragon worked to develop a two-day event that would educate the public on human trafficking, a widespread issue in Northeast Ohio. Held Sept. 21 – 22, the second annual symposium drew 125 attendees. 

“I discovered a passion for learning about the tragic world of human trafficking and pushing for awareness in our community,” Ragon said. “It happens in our own backyard, right here in Canton, Ohio. If people are just made aware of that fact, I think they would be more likely to see things a little differently. Something may raise a red flag and a life could be saved.”

Generating Awareness

Fueling a sense of purpose in students united by a single cause is what Leslie Heaphy, Ph.D., associate professor of history and Kent State Stark Honors Program coordinator, seeks to ignite. The Anti-Human Trafficking Symposium has become an annual honors project that is organized by students and delivers meaningful content to the community through presentations, panel discussions and short films.

Freshman marketing student, Megyn Bostic, produced one such film. “The Naivete of a Young Girl” depicts types of human trafficking, including forced labor and marriages.

Bostic worked with Ragon and senior public health student Michaela Morris to coordinate with presenting organizations and sponsors, including Akron General Hospital, the Cleveland Clinic, Partners Against Trafficking Humans Stark, and the Domestic Violence Project, Inc., among others.

“Human trafficking is something we need to draw more attention to,” said Morris. “People in America, especially people in our area in Northeast Ohio, don’t think that this is something that’s happening here. They think it only exists in other parts of the world.”

During the September symposium, Jan Apisa, director of community engagement for the Victim Assistance Program of Summit County, discussed results from a study that describes the depth of human trafficking – a $150 billion industry. 

Courage to Hope

For Ragon, that statistic is startling. Still, she is shocked more by the fact that people do not take a stand to end human trafficking.

The 21-year-old dreams of being an advocate while she juggles nursing classes at the Kent Campus and working at Canton’s Aultman Hospital as an emergency-room technician. Her career goal is this: to become a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) and help victims in the ER.

“I think the biggest thing is to give them hope,” said Ragon. “I went through a very dark time in my life, but there is light. There is something better. It is not always going to be like this. I just want them to know that. 

“One day, you will begin to feel like a normal person again, but it can be a lifelong journey. It begins with the courage to hope for that one day.”

Ragon is thankful her “one day” is today. 


Pictured in photo: Students (from left to right) Cameron Haught, Anna Grund, Michaela Morris, Tatyana Ragon and Megyn Bostic at the Anti-Human Trafficking Symposium held this fall at Kent State University at Stark.

Want to make a difference by getting involved? Contact Dr. Leslie Heaphy at lheaphy@kent.edu or Tatyana Ragon at tragon@kent.edu to help with Kent State Stark’s next Anti-Human Trafficking Symposium. 

Dreamers and Doers: Lainey Ward
Friday, October 19, 2018

Heart of gold.

Life was just beginning for Lainey Ward when doctors worked on her heart to keep it beating.

A 4-month-old baby, Ward was in the fight of her life before she knew what living really meant. Her whole world was mom and dad and the mobile dancing over her crib.

Open-heart surgery and operations to fix three birth defects kept Ward pushing forward, overcoming diagnosis after diagnosis.

First, the girl who would not live, did.

Then, the girl who could not walk, walked.

Later, the girl who found it difficult to learn would teach.

Today, Ward finds herself observing classrooms in preparation for leading lessons. A processing disorder and ADHD meant learning how to learn differently. Her goals for tomorrow are intervening when children often need it most – in middle childhood.

“As a teacher, you can really make an impact during this transitional phase in a child’s education,” she said. “I’m specializing in math because I hated it. I realized I could do it, but I just had to work a litt