2020 Virtual Student Conference
LIVE PRESENTATIONS

FRIDAY APRIL 24, 2020
11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
PRESENTED THROUGH ZOOM

Each presentation will be 20 minutes long with 10 minutes for Q&A following each presenter. 


Live Presentation Schedule

 
11 a.m.
Wade Scott
Our Sense of Place in American Society

VIEW PRESENTATION (includes Welcome by Dr. Leslie Heaphy)

Abstract: When people think of social and civil rights movements and demonstrations in America, they instantly think of the 1960s with programs like the African American Civil Rights Movement, the Women’s Rights movements or the Gay Rights movement, including the demonstrations that occurred during said movements. Demonstrations like Bloody Sunday or The Stonewall Riots often come to mind. Yet, one Civil Rights movement & protest that people do not think of is the Disability Rights Movement & the most impactful demonstration that occurred in America during the 1970s. Disabled America lacked a sense of place until the 1970s due to social oppression from Mainstream America. Their actions turned disability advocates into political aggressors trying to find some sense of place in mainstream American societies & communities across the country. The fight for implementation of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 helped many find their place in mainstream societies. This presentation will be supported with mainly primary sources & some secondary sources.

Wade Austin Scott is a senior at Kent State Stark majoring in History. Wade is well versed in 19th – 20th century American history. His main passion is in Disabled America’s historiography, specifically, the 1960s – 1980s Disability Rights Movement. After obtaining his B.A. in History, Wade plans on working in museums. His goal with his degree is to have the opportunity to change an individual or individuals lives, mindset, and/or bring awareness to the general public on issues throughout history that may not have been known. Also, in his free time during the summers, Wade enjoys fishing trips with his cousins and grandpa.


11:30 a.m.
Amanda Browning
Morgan le Fay, Literature, Art and Music
 (pre-recorded, narrated PowerPoint)

VIEW PRESENTATION

Abstract: Arthurian literature is wrought with fantastical creatures, incredible locales, and breathtaking plot twists; however, the most remarkable feature of these beloved stories is the depiction of a character whose reputation proceeds her. This presentation is an exploration of the various archetypal themes and historical characterizations of Morgan le Fay, utilizing literature, art, music, and film as a means of understanding this iconic character’s continued significance. Morgan le Fay persists as an easily recognizable female persona, despite the male-dominated literature from which she originally derives. Though Morgan’s earliest depictions are strictly from the perspective of the men with whom she comes into contact, she has still effortlessly embodied a vast array of archetypal characterizations, retaining her influence, because she is representative of the tether between humanity and memory. Morgan le Fay undertakes whatever role is necessary in order to remind the audience of their ability to overcome the judgment of others.

Amanda Browning is a senior level student majoring in English with a special focus in British Literature. Following graduation, Amanda intends to pursue higher education, earning a master’s degree in Library Science in order to foster the necessary resources to begin a career in a library, museum, or university.


12 p.m.
Toni Boling
May 4th Music Video

VIEW MAY 4TH MUSIC VIDEO    VIEW PRESENTATION

Abstract: This will be a video that shows the escalation of tension that was rising among young people in the late 1960’s that resulted in the deadly shootings at Kent State on May 4th, 1970. The video plans to use the songs ‘Volunteers’ by Jefferson Airplane, the live version from Woodstock of ‘I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die-Rag’ by Country Joe McDonald, and a live version of ‘Find the Cost of Freedom’ by Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. In this video I want to use footage from the era that shows the increased influence of the counterculture and the escalation of protests and unrest among young people that eventually exploded into the violent confrontation at Kent State that ended with the killings of four students by the National Guard.

Toni Boling is a senior at Kent State Stark majoring in Environmental Studies and minoring in Geography. She plans on continuing on to grad school after her bachelor’s degree and then hopes to work for the National Parks and eventually travel and write about environmental issues. Toni loves the outdoors and dabbling in creative projects. She has also been working with Dr. Hamilton since 2015 doing original research and presenting at local student conferences and has recently joined the new Environmental Studies group on campus, EnviroKent.


12:30 p.m.
Toni Boling
Creative Writing about U.S. Environmental History

VIEW PRESENTATION

Abstract: Throughout history, the perspective of the human experience is a central focus and often forgets the impacts that nature suffers during these important events. I decided to change this narrative and write a poetic account from the perspective of five different parts of nature that suffered during the history of American colonization and after. In this paper I tell the history through the lens of the Tree, River, Bison, Soil, and Wolf as Europeans colonized North America and vastly changed the natural landscape. My goal is to show the emotional perspective of nature during these events that severely impacted the natural environment and reveal the connectedness of nature with the actions of humanity to better understand nature’s suffering.

Toni Boling is a senior at Kent State Stark majoring in Environmental Studies and minoring in Geography. She plans on continuing on to grad school after her bachelor’s degree and then hopes to work for the National Parks and eventually travel and write about environmental issues. Toni loves the outdoors and dabbling in creative projects. She has also been working with Dr. Hamilton since 2015 doing original research and presenting at local student conferences and has recently joined the new Environmental Studies group on campus, EnviroKent.


1 p.m.
Brooke Pandrea
Wanders Through the West: An Analysis of Works by Alexei Savrasov in Relation to Nationalism and Realism in Russia

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Abstract: This paper analyzes the works of Russian painter Alexei Savrasov (1830-1897) in relation to a trip he took abroad to visit the 1862 International Exhibition in London and as a member of the Peredvizhniki. By looking at select works from his oeuvre, this paper establishes the idea that Savrasov’s trip abroad to view works internationally may have only solidified his style as staunchly Russian, foregoing his past training in European style painting and influence as fiction in his mature period. By viewing his works in relation to the larger ideas of realism and nationalism in Russia from the art world during this period, this paper establishes the idea that the trip abroad and reactions to the West by those in Russia greatly influenced the science behind his personal lyrical landscape style.

Brooke Pandrea is a senior at Kent State Stark, dual majoring in Art History and History with a concentration in Global History. After graduating, she plans to continue on to graduate school for Library Science. Her interests include Asian American art history, hiking, and traveling.