Career Possibilities | Kent State Stark | Kent State University

Career Possibilities in Environmental Studies

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANT
Environmental consultants assess how develop­ment projects might impact the water, soil, air or wildlife in the area. All organizations must prepare envIronmental impact studies when they are planning to develop virgin land or repurpose currently developed land. Consultants suggest how to mitigate any potential impacts. Other jobs for consultants may be to recommend solutions to pollution issues. Environmental consultants require the communications skills to compose technical reports, to engage with the public and to deliver recommendations to clients.

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATOR
Environmental Educators must synthesize available information about the surrounding environment and teach others about it. This can include educa­tion in a variety of settings, print or broadcast journalism, online media, and advocacy. Environ­mental Studies majors are trained to collect and interpret information and to conduct field work, all vital functions to their position as environmen­tal educators. They convey their passion for the environment through engagement with visitors or students. The need for public speaking skills, acquired in the major, allows them to develop polished and dynamic presentations.

PUBLIC RELATIONS SPECIALIST
Environmental organizations shape public percep­tions to gain political influence and financial resources for their initiatives. Public relations specialists apply environmental knowledge to write press releases about programs and activities at their employer or client organizations. They utiize advanced writing skills to develop content for the websites of environmental organizations and to compose text for fund raising brochures and letters.

FUNDRAISER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CAUSES
Fundraisers rely on solid communication skills to compose letters and make pitches to prospective contributors. They orchestrate fundraising events and plan campaigns through all types of media. In targeting prospective donors for contributions to environmental causes, fundraisers embrace their organizations’ goals and operations. Environmen­tal Studies majors gain this knowledge and convey the benefits of supporting environmental initiatives to others.

ENVIRONMENTAL ATTORNEY
If you are interested in pursuing a degree in Law, the knowledge gained as an Environmental Studies major is helpful for attorneys who work on environ­mentally related cases. Environmental attorneys interview expert witnesses like environmental engineers, biologists, chemists and environmental scientists as they prepare and litigate their cases. They interpret scientific material and evaluate the validity/reliability of those findings. They use advanced writing skills to compose legal briefs and other documents. They draft the language for environmental regulations if they work for govern­mental entities. In court, they tap presentation skills mastered by Environmental Studies majors. 

SUSTAINABILITY SPECIALIST
Organizations of all kinds are looking for greener ways of carrying out their functions. Sustainabil­ity specialists assess environmental practices and impacts, they recommend and implement strategies to conserve resources and seek to limit environmental damage. Sustainability specialists must assess the impact of current operations on the environment and to determine the potential value of alternatives. Sustainability specialists use writing, presentation and interpersonal skills to write proposals, organize projects, and urge colleagues to adopt alternative practices. 

POLICY ANALYST
Generating realistic proposals for environmental policy requires an in-depth knowledge of scientific concepts. Environmental Studies majors acquire solid foundations in biology and the geosciences. They have the research skills necessary to decipher information related to public policy recommenda­tions. They have the analytical and statistical skills needed to interpret and process that information. Advanced technical writing skills are used to compose scientifically oriented policy documents. 

ENVIRONMENTAL / CONSERVATION PLANNER
Organizations of all kinds are looking for greener ways of carrying out their functions. Sustainabil­ity specialists assess environmental practices and impacts, they recommend and implement strategies to conserve resources and seek to limit environmental damage. Sustainability specialists must assess the impact of current operations on the environment and to determine the potential value of alternatives. Sustainability specialists use writing. presentation and interpersonal skills to write proposals, organize projects, and urge colleagues to adopt alternative practices.

ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIALIST
An environmental specialist helps with conduct­ing environmental assessments, takes samples of various elements within an environment (water, soil, etc.) for testing, and takes part in the testing of the elements among other responsibilities. An environmental specialist is highly schooled in envi­ronmental law and policy with a bachelors degree in environmental studies or related field. For entry level positions as an assistant, little experience is required, as many people tend to learn on the job. Environmental specialists tend to be highly organized and excellent at written and verbal communication. 

NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGER
A natural resources manager serves as wildlife and plant life conservationist and can work in the public or private spheres. Natural resources managers who work for government agencies typically oversee and enforce environmental laws. Those who work in parks take charge of educa­tional programs and tours for park visitors. This may also involve the preservation and sustainable management of park and forest lands. It includes the ecological maintenance of the parks, the management of park visitors, and the observation of their impact. Natural resource managers typi­cally possess a degree in environmental studies or a related field and may have a masters for more advanced jobs. They also have a few years of expe­rience and possess excellent communication and organizational skills. 

PARK STAFF
Most park staff positions involve education and interpretation. Park staff plan and conduct educa­tional programs for the public on the science, culture, or history of a park, provide information about the park to guests at a visitors’ center, conduct field trips to point out park highlights, maintain park structures and facilities, create educational displays, and write brochures. Many park staff have degrees in environmental studies. A solid background in earth science, envi­ronmental science, and biology is important for work at many locations, as is an understanding of public policy and communication. This major can prepare students to become park interpreters, so that they can educate visitors about natural and scientific features.